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ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

^^^^^^^^^^ AT ^^^^^^^^^^ 

WILSON. NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOC APTIST 

VOL. LXIV. NOVEMBER 15, 1930 / NO. 1 



THE WORD OF THE LORD WAS FULFILLED. '> 
"And It came to pass when the captains of the chariots perceived that 

it was not the king of Israel, that they turned back from pursuing him. 
And a certain man drew a bow at a venture, and smote the king of 

Israel between the joints of the harness: wherefore he said unto the 

driver of his chariot. Turn thine hand, and carry me out of the host: for 

I am wounded. 

And the battle increased that day: and the king stayed up in his chariot 
against the Syrians, and died at even: and the blood ran out of the 
wound into the midst of the chariot. 

And there went a proclamation throughout the host about the going 
down of the sun, saying, every man to his city, and every man to his 
own country. 

So the king died, and was brought to Samaria; and they buried the 
king in Samaria. 

And one washed the chariot in the pool of Samaria, and the dogs licked 
up his blood; and they washed his armor; according unto the word of the 
Lord which he spake. 

Now the rest of the acts of Ahab, and all that he did, and the ivory 
house which he made, and all the cities that he built, are they not writ- 
ten in the book of the Chronicles of the kings of Israel? 

— 1 Kings 22:23-39 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 



NOTICE! 



When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



' LP 

2)ev>ote0 to the dause of S^esus Cbdst 



MEDITATION. 

While thinking upon the wonder- 
ful mysteries and beauties of godli- 
ness, I am made to wonder if I am 
one of His, and if so why am I thus 
fettered with sin and satan. Satan, 
if he could, would never let me go 
to church or do anything in the 
way of righteousness, but in spite of 
the fact that I have him to contend 
with every day of my life, and 
knowing as I do my sinfulness and 
imperfection, I am one of those I 
hope that has been tried in the fiery 
trials of afflictions to the extent 
that I have been made to call upon 
a Saviour who can and will save me 
from the enemies' hands. He is an 
all-wise, all-merciful, ever-present 
help in every time of trouble. "He 
poureth contempt upon princes, and 
weakeneth the strength of the 
mighty." Job 12:21. No man is 
able to even comprehend the ma- 
jesty and power of Almighty God. 
He can raise the fallen, cheer the 
faint, open the eyes of the blind, 
cause the deaf to hear, the lame to 
walk. He can open up to our un- 
derstanding all His deep mysteries. 
No man by searching can find out 
God. For great is the mystery of 
godliness. And he is a rewarder of 
those that diligently seek him. 
"Blessed are they that hunger and 
thirst after righteousness for they 
shall be filled." There is such a 
contrast between God's goodness 
and mercy and poor weak human 
beings. There is no human on 



earth that ever can even appreciate 
the greatest blessing that any per- 
son ever had without his hard and 
stony heart has been quickened in- 
to divine life. And then there are 
times in the life of God's humble 
poor that they are brought so low 
down in humility that they can see 
the beauty in even the smallest 
things. Then it is when he feels 
that the Lord has been mindful of 
me all the days of my life. 

After a person has been called 
out of darkness into His marvelous 
light, he is the most wonderfully 
blessed person on earth. He may 
be as poor as any one so far as nat- 
ural possessions are concerned, but 
he is perfectly rich. Therefore we 
should strive to live in such a way 
that the world should see our good 
works and honor our Father which 
is in heaven. "Therefore if any 
man be in Christ he is a new crea- 
ture; old things have passed away; 
behold, all things are become new. 
5th chapter and 17th verse Cor. 
18th verse. And all things are of 
God. In the 12th chapter of Ro- 
mans there are several duties to the 
child of God — "Present your bodies 
a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable 
unto God, be not conformed to this 
world: but be ye transformed by 
the renewing of your minds that ye 
may prove what is that good and 
acceptable and perfect will of God." 
"Knowing the terror of the Lord 
we persuade men." Cor. 5:11. In 
Galatians 5:1 we also find these 



218993 



2 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



exhortations, "Stand fast therefore 
in the liberty wherewith Christ hath 
made us free, and be not entangled 
again with the yoke of bondage." 

"And let us not be weary in well 
doing; for in due season we shall 
reap if we faint not." Gal. 6:9. 

In Paul's letter to the Ephesians 
he tells us as people of the living 
God, "Be ye followers of God, as 
dear children." Ephes. 5:1. "For 
ye were sometimes darkness, but 
now are ye light in the Lord : walk 
as children of light." Ephes. 5:8. 
"Neither give place to the devil." 
Ephes. 5:27. Also in the 13th verse 
he said, "Wherefore take unto you 
that you may be able to withstand 
in the evil day, and having done all 
to stand." 14th and 15th verses: 
"Stand therefore, having your loins 
girt about with truth, and having on 
the breastplate of righteousness." 
"And your feet shod with the prep- 
arations of the gospel of peace. 
"Above all, taking the shiel.l of 
faith, wherewith ye shall be ab^e to 
quench the fiery darts of the 
wicked." "For we are the circum- 
sion, which worship God in the 
spirit, and rejoice in Christ Jesus, 
and have no confidence in the 
flesh." 

How beautiful are the words of 
the poet where he said : 

"Better than this life of mine. 
Saviour is Thy love divine, 
Better far than Ophir's gold, 
Love that never can be told." 

Love is a wonderful thing, and 
when we are made in love to bear 
afflictions needful rod, light, kind 
and sweet the strokes appear, 
through fellowship with God. Some- 
times we feel that our sufferings 



are too great, but they are not, for 
they are all for a purpose and a 
good one. They only refine us and 
bring us down at the Master's feet 
in hum.bleness and submission to 
His will. The Lord makes His peo- 
ple serve Him. If they don't they 
have a fearful looking forward to 
of fiery troubles that bring them 
back to their duty. They are kill- 
ed every day of their life to the love 
of sin and made alive and awake 
in the knowledge of God's myster- 
ies. Somewhere in Job we find 
where he said "When He has tried 
me I shall be brought forth as 
gold." "Therefore despise not the 
chastening of the Lord." But be 
reconciled to His will as much af 
lies in ynr.r power. We don t have 
the power to serve Him v.- we 
ought, but ^he child of God is a 
praying character and the Lord is 
a prayer giver and a prayer render- 
ing God and He has said what ye 
Ho'; i:i riv namo, that will I do, also, 
' " ^ - . ,, thirsts after 

■ be filled." And 
. lhat mourn for 
tliey riliall be comforted." 

I have written a portion of the 
' in.os t'^at have, I hope, been shown 
ne in Leauty and purity and have 
L 1 f'cc, :y impressed on my mind, 
i r I ha\ e of late, in spite of the 
fact that I feel as one of the poets 
did when he said "Poor, weak and 
worthless though I am, I have a rich 
almighty friend." This is a bless- 
ed thought when we can feel it, 
and too when we can feel as Job did 
when he said, "Though He slay me 
yet will I trust Him." And another 
place in the scripture it has been 
said, "If this our earthly tabernacle 
were dissolved, we have a building 
of God, and a house not made with 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



3 



hands, eternal in the heavens." An- 
other place it is said, "I know that 
my Redeemer liveth." How bless- 
ed are these things when they come 
with such beauty and force we can 
sav then that ray hope is a big hope. 
But there are so many times when 
we feel that His presence is clean 
gone forevermore. Will He be 
merciful no more forever. Well I 
must stop. For the half has never 
yet been told. I sometimes feel as 
Brother Denny's father did when he 
said if he had a thousand tongues 
he could have them all employed in 
telling the joys of his salvation. 
While there are others that I am 
the opposite — a miserable and un- 
done creature. 

Brother Denny, you rnay if you 
see fit publish this and look over 
all mistakes with love. For it is 
said, "Look over one another for 
good and not for evil," 

A little sister I hope, 

ANNIE HOOKS. 



SAYINGS OF ELDER GOLD. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

I would be glad to see these ex- 
tracts in the Landmark, written by 
your venerable father, who was 
safe, sound and conservative. 

Lee Hanks. 
"Slackness," by Elder P. D. Gold 
(Joshua, 1889) 

"All the doctrine, the experience, 
and the good works, all the re- 
proofs, and rebukes, all the suffer- 
ings, all the joys and peace, the life 
and blessedness of salvation belong 
to the church of the true and living 
God ; whether Paul, or Apollos, or 
Cephas, or life, or death, or things 
present or things to come, every 
one and all are yours, and ye are 
Christ's and Christ is God's." .... 



We desire to see brethren show 
their moderation by giving good 
heed to all that God commands, not 
attacking more importance to any 
one thing, to the neglect of another, 
than the word of God warrants: but 
rightly dividing the word of truth, 
and giving to each his portion in 
due season. . . Be diligent therefore 
to occupy and enjoy the land, and 
do not act as the world slurs you by 
saying, If I believed as you do I 
would sit down on the stool of do- 
nothing, and take my fill of sin, for 
if I am going to be saved I will be 
saved, it matters not what I do, or 
how I live. If you are saved it does 
matter very much how you live, and 
v/hat you do. If you call on the 
Father of Spirits who without re- 
spect of persons judgeth according 
to every man's work, what manner 
of men ought ye to be in all holy 
conversation. For it is true in the 
gospel as under the law, that the 
obedient eat the good of the land. 
Under the law those that obeyed 
the lavv' ate the natural good fruits 
of the land of Canaan, while those 
in the gospel who are obedient to 
the faith enterinto the joys of their 
Land : if ye know these things hap- 
py are ye if ye do them ; if any man 
keep my sayings, I will love him, 
and my Father will love him, and 
we will make our abode with him. 
Blessed are they that keep His com- 
mandments that they may have 
right to enter through the gates in- 
to the city. Be not deceived, God 
is not mocked, whatsoever a man 
soweth that shall he reap. 

These things written under the 
law are examples to us upon whom 
the ends of the world is come. . . . 
He that is faithful in preaching re- 
pentance toward God and faith to- 



4 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ward our Lord Jesus Christ, yields 
not a whit of the doctrine of elec- 
tion, but is entering more fully into 
the land. He that preaches that 
believers should be careful to keep 
their bodies under, and denying un- 
godliness and world lusts, should 
live soberly and godly in this pres- 
ent world surrender no part of 
truth, but only more fully defends 
it. He that teaches that all that 
are taught in preaching should give 
to those that teach, deny not one 
word of the doctrine of truth, but 
only more fully demonstrates and 
illustrates its glorious unity and 
perfection. 

The land belongs to us, the truth 
is held by the Primitive or Old Bap- 
tists; but we are slack to go up to 
possess the land. We do not hold 
the land as we should. For many 
are unwilling to contribute any- 
thing, saying. It is not right to give 
anything to preachers. Too many 
are satisfied with what is called 
preaching that is not a faithful ex- 
position of the word of God, only 
a mere talk about truth, but not 
digging on all hills with the mat- 
tock. 

Churches are too slack about or- 
daining preachers that have not the 
blessed gift of preaching Jesus, 
They talk but it stirs not up Israel 
to fight. They repeat some scrip- 
tures, but do not bring out things 
new and old, nor stir men's minds 
to their obligations to God, nor 
show the people of God their trans- 
gressions. . . . 

Deacons are chosen merely to of- 
ficiate at the Lord's supper in hand- 
ing around the bread and wine, not 
considering that they are appointed 
to serve tables, to see how the poor 
are living at home every day, and 



to see how their pastor is faring at 
home every day. Some people 
think that if they feed the preacher 
while he is at their home that is 
enough, and that he does not need 
anything to eat except when he is 
in the act of preaching. . . . 

How many of you pray in your 
families at home? How many of 
you encourage your children to read 
the Bible? How many of your re- 
quire your children to go to your 
own preaching places? How many 
of you allow your children to ram- 
ble off not caring where they go or 
what false preaching they hear? 
How few there be that diligently 
search the scriptures and devote 
their lives to the service of God, 
seeking to know the Lord; forget- 
ting those things which are behind? 
. . .Some preachers harp on some 
one point of doctrine making it a 
hobby to the neglect of other mat- 
ters the God of heaven has also 
taught. We meet some preachers 
that cannot speak without all the 
time dwelling specially on predesti- 
nation, but cry out against preach- 
ing that they that believe should 
be careful to maintain good. 

Baptists generally hold to predes- 
tination, and I am glad they do. If 
they did not, I should want to go 
somewhere else and to a people 
that do live it; for it is the doctrine 
of God our Saviour; but Baptists 
are often slack about entering into 
the goodly land by neglecting to 
perform good works and bring forth 
fruits meet for repentance which 
the same God that teaches election 
teaches to be observed. . . . 

Predestination directly and ex- 
pressly concerns the salvation of 
the elect of God. (Joshua p. 142) 

It should be observed that it was 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



6 



Israel that sinned and they had no 
excuse for it, nor did a true Israel- 
ite ever plead any excuse for his 
transgression nor charge God fool- 
ishly 

No theory of truth can exonerate 
the transgressor from his guilt, nor 
charge God as the author of sin." 
—Eld. P. D. Gold, from Joshua. 



ASSOCIATIONS. 

My mind seems to be exercised 
along the line of authority of asso- 
ciations. Associations are a crea- 
ture of the churches, and composed 
of churches, who for their mutual 
comfort, and understanding of one 
another, join themselves together in 
associations. 

Associations do not have author- 
ity to dictate to churches. Draw- 
ing doctrinal lines in associations is 
wrong. If there is a difference of 
opinion regarding doctrinal expres- 
sions, would it not be better to seek 
the mind of the churches, compos- 
ing the association, before passing 
resolutions regarding it, ask the 
churches to voice their opinion of it 
in their next letters. 

For instance a resolution was 
passed in an association recently, in 
substance as follows, "Advising the 
churches of said body to condemn 
the course of those who preached 
the "absolute predestination of all 
things." 

The Committee of Arrangements 
drew and recommended the resolu- 
tion. The moderator of the asso- 
ciation being a part of said com- 
mittee, recommended it and advised 
the brethren to mark those who 
cause division among you. 

The vote on this resolution was 
divided, members of the same 
church voting against one another. 



Even deacon and pastor of same 
church, voting against one another. 
Who is causing division? Ten 
churches of one section not being 
represented by a single messenger, 
when the resolution was passed. A 
matter of this kind should be refer- 
red to the churches before action is 
taken. 

The people of God should strive 
to be a unit, in their voting on things 
of importance, seeking the mind of 
Christ in their deliberations. How 
beautful it is to see brethren seek- 
ing the guidance of God in their 
deliberations, trying to come to- 
gether on all things as one people. 

How sad we are made to feel 
when we see a portion of an asso- 
ciation trying and passing resolu- 
tions over the protest of others 
without getting the mind of the 
churches. 

The only place to settle all trou- 
bles is where the trouble starts. 
Jesus said "Tell it unto the church 
Matt. 18-17. Just a word to those 
who would draw a line in regard to 
Absolute Predestination of all 
thing. Do not do it. 

This doctrine has been believed 
by able servants of God for centur- 
ies, being handed down to us in the 
"London Confession of Faith, set 
forth by representatives of over 100 
baptised congregations in London, 
in 1689, and recognized generally 
as the Primitive Baptist Confession 
of Faith among our people. Chapter 
3 — article one reads as follows: 
"God hath decreed in Himself from 
all eternity, by the most wise and 
holy counsel of His own will, freely 
and unchangeably, all things what- 
soever come to pass. Yet so as 
thereby is God neither the author 
of sin nor hath fellowship with any 



6 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



therein; nor is violence offered to 
the will of the creature, nor yet is 
the liberty or contingency of second 
causes taken away, but rather es- 
tablished. In which appears His 
wisdom in disposing all things, and 
power and faithfulness in accom- 
pulishing his decree, Hassell's 
Church History, P. 670, also Chap. 5 
article please read. I feel we would 
all do well at this time to read our 
confessions of faith on page 837, of 
Hassell's History. Elder C. B. Has- 
sels has this to say of our articles of 
faith: "Primitive Baptists stand by 
these articles; they read them, they 
believe them to be true, and they 
preach the doctrine contained in 
them and hope that themselves and 
their predecessors will continue to 
do so, even to the end of the world. 
And this they do with great pleas- 
ure, though well aware that such a 
course is disapproved by nearly all 
other professed Christians in Ameri- 
ca." Elder Sylvester Hassell fur- 
ther says: "Father believer, and I 
believe, that the Old London Confes- 
sion of Faith taught the Apostle's 
doctrine more accurately, and thor- 
oughly than any other uninspired 
production; and therefore it is that 
I deeply regret the increasing ten- 
dency in our midst to ignore, and 
deny its teachings. The London 
Confession of Faith is, to be sure, 
not inspired nor infallible; but no 
other document that I have ever 
read, so fully and impartially sum- 
marizes, in my judgment, "the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing 
but the truth." This last from the 
late Eld. S. H. Hassell. There have 
been faithful servants of God all 
along who have preached the un- 
limited predestination of all things 
as set forth in London Confession of 



Faith, Chapter 3, Article 1. There 
have been other faithful servants 
who have been more limited in their 
views of same. These brethren have 
lived together in peace, without 
raising bars. And the one who 
makes a test of fellowship of it now 
is doing wrong. The sooner lead- 
ers in associations are given to know 
that drawing doctrinal lines at this 
time if persisted in will lead to 
faithful churches withdrawing from 
the body, the better. Better leave 
off having associations if they can- 
not be held in peace and love. 

May God give us to contend for 
the order of His house, recognizing 
no higher court than the church of 
God, keeping the matter of doctrine 
and order of our people above per- 
sonalities, abiding in our calling, 
forgiving one another, as God for 
Christ's sake has forgiven us. I 
realize I am very imperfect, but if 
not deceived I have the Primitive 
Baptist cause at heart and can re- 
peat: 

"My soul shall pray for Zion still 

While life or breath remains, 
Here my best friends, my kindred 
dwell, 

Where God my Saviour reigns." 

After reading this to Bro. E. R. 
Harris, for many years efficient 
moderator of Upper Country Line 
Association, together with other 
able brethren and meeting with 
their approval, I am submitting this 
I hope with an eye single to the 
glory of God and good of His peo- 
ple. 

D. V. SPANGLER, 

Cascade, Va. 

P. S. — If any feel to write me their 
approval or disapproval of this do 
so. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



7 



A GOOD MEETING. 

We were honored by having two 
of the Editors of Zion's Landmark, 
as well as a number of other friends 
under our roof during the session 
of the Black Creek Primitive Bap- 
tist Association, which met this year 
in Wilson. They were Elders O. J. 
Denny and J. T. Rowe and the lat- 
ter's wife and children. We tried 
to have Elder Gilbert, but he was 
unable to attend the Black Creek 
Association but was with us the fol- 
lowing week, speaking in the 
church here, and attending the Mill 
Branch Association. 

The weather was fine and preach- 
ing edifying and instructive, and al- 
together it was a very enjoyable oc- 
casion. The sessions of the Asso- 
ciation were held in the church on 
Friday and in the High School audi- 
torium on Saturday and Sunday. 

The city authorities assigned a 
number of police officers who saw 
that all had a parking place, and 
order was maintained while the Boy 
Scouts under their Executive Sec- 
retary Mr. Herbert Stuckey looked 
after the people and were at their 
beck and call and rendered much 
valuable service. 

The local ministers as well as the 
deacons and members of the church 
were very attentive and gave their 
guests an enjoyable meeting. 

The following Elders attended 
the Association, O. J. Denny, J. W. 
Wyatt, J. A. Herndon, Ben Martin, 
Tilghman Sawyer, N. H. Harrison, 
E. L. Cobb, S. B. Denny, John T. 
Williams, George Boswell, R. H. 
Boswell, B. F. McKinney, W. B. 
Kearney, F. W. Keene, Joshua T. 
Rowe, A. L. Holloway, A. B. Den- 
son, T. E. Stanfield, Xure Lee, W. R. 
Hines, L. E. Bryan, H. F. Hutchins, 



Leonard Raper, J. T. Collier, J. C. 
Moore, Joseph Fly, J. C. Smith, El- 
der Westbrook, E. L. Pearce, A. B. 
Denson, T. H. B. Pridgen, and James 
S. Corbett. 

Those who spoke during the As- 
sociation were Elders S. B, Denny, 

A. L. Holloway, J. A. Herndon, W. 

B. Kearney, Xure Lee, M. B. Mar- 
tin, F. W. Keene, J. S. Corbitt, 
Tilghman Sawyer, B. F. McKinney, 
J. T. Rowe, O. J. Denny, T. A. Stan- 
field, L. E. Bryan, and Cyrus 
Adams. 

Elder George W. Boswell, Mod- 
erator of the Association closed the 
meeting with a fervent expression 
of praise to God for His blessings. 
He also stated that the Association 
had enjoyed a very good meeting, 
and thanks were given the Educa- 
tional authorities of the county for 
the use of the auditorium, the police 
department, the Boy Scouts, and 
the people of Wilson for their many 
attentions, and fine hospitality. 



"THEY KNOW NOT WHAT 
THEY DO." 

The Saviour thus prayed for those 
who put Him to death, and of course 
His Father heard and answered this 
prayer, for He said, the Father al- 
ways hears me. "It pleased the 
Lord to bruise Him," still it was with 
wicked hands He was crucified and 
slain. That which they did not 
know, was unknowable, they nor 
any mortal has the capacity* to 
learn. He was still Saul of Tarsus, 
though he was brought up at the 
feet of Gamaliel and taught accord- 
ing to the perfect manner of the 
law. Gamaliel could not know nor 
teach this great truth; for to know 
certain things, we must be born 
again. That which is born of the 



8 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



flesh is flesh, and that which is born 
of the spirit is spirit. 

"The natural man receiveth not 
the things of the Spirit of God : for 
they are foolishness to him, neither 
can he know them; because they 
are spiritually discerned." The 
above quotation from the holy scrip- 
tures shows precisely what we see 
in the expression at the head of this 
short letter — "They know not what 
they do." In nature's darkness 
none of the princes of this world 
knew Him, for had they known 
Him, never would they have cruci- 
fied the Lord of glory. Without 
being born of an incorruptible seed 
we just don't know. Paul did cer- 
tain things before he was enlighten- 
ed by the spirit; from the fact he 
was in a state of ignorance which 
neither he, nor all the people of the 
earth could change. 

Before this he was a blasphemer, 
and a persecutor, but he says, "I 
obtained mercy, because I did it ig- 
norantly in unbelief." He was ex- 
cusable, from the fact he "verily 
thought within himself that he 
ought to do many things contrary to 
the name of Jesus." It had not 
been revealed, for unrevealed 
things can't be known only by reve- 
lation. "God has made foolish the 
wisdom of this world." 

So, where is the wise? If he has 
a form of Godliness, he denies the 
power thereof, and is ever learning, 
and never able to come to a knowl- 
edge of the truth. "We ourselves 
were sometime darkness," "but God 
who comanded light to shine out of 
darkness, has shined in our heart." 

When the Lord first spoke to 
Saul He said, "Who is it Lord," And 
Jesus plainly revealed the unknow- 
able part to him, "I am Jesus, whom 



thou persecuteth," is the introduc- 
tion by the Saviour Himself. They 
who journeyed with him, saw in- 
deed a light, but they heard not the 
voice of Him who spoke to him. 
This voice came from heaven. 
"There came a voice out of the 
cloud saying. This is My beloved 
Son, hear Him." "Eyes we have and 
see not, ears and hear not, hearts, 
and do not understand." "No man 
can say that Jesus is Lord, but by 
the Holy Ghost." 

J. T. SATTERWHITE 



WE ENTER ANOTHER YEAR. 

With this number of the Land- 
mark we enter another year, and in 
passing we desire to say that the 
Lord has been most merciful and 
kind, and has blessed us far above 
what we deserve. We also desire 
to express our appreciation to the 
brethren and sisters and friends of 
this paper, for the kindness and con- 
sideration they have shown us, not 
only in their patronage but in their 
patience with the shortcomings of 
the publisher of this paper. 

We trust that each and every 
reader of the Landmark may have 
a happy Christmas, and a prosper- 
ous New Year, and that the Lord 
will be with them all and keep them 
through the coming year, and that 
His face will continue to shine upon 
them. 

J. D. GOLD. 



CHANGE OF ADDRESS. 

Mr. J. D. Gold 

Please publish in the Landmark. 

My former address was West St. 
James St. 220. 

Is now 221 West St. James St. 

H. C. BROWN, 

Tarboro, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



9 



Zion's Landmark 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder 0. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
Elder M. L. Gilbert — Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. No. 1 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C, NOV. 15, 1930 



1ST. COR. 5:7-13. 

Mr. Z. R. Balance, Rosebore, N. 
C, asks for views on the above 
scripture. The 8th. verse reads: 
"Therefore let us keep the feast, 
not with old leaven, neither with 
the leaven of malice and wicked- 
ness; but with the unleavened 
bread of sincerity and truth." 

In olden times, a lump of dough 
was mixed with the flour or meal, 
and soon the whole lump was leav- 
ened, soured or fermented, and thus 
a small portion of leaven soon leav- 
ened the whole lump. So it is with 
false doctrines or unclean and un- 
chaste living ; both soon bring trou- 
ble into any Church where it 
abounds. 

Paul teaches us a two-fold lesson 
in this epistle. First a spiritual 
lesson, showing the difference be- 
tween the unleavened bread of Sin- 



cerity and Truth, the pure unadul- 
terated Gospel of Christ, and the 
false doctrines of the Pharisees and 
Sadducees. 

Second, a lesson in orderly 
Church Government, in withdraw- 
ing from those who persist in walk- 
ing in the unclean, unchaste, life of 
the idolatrous, adulterous, drunken 
and otherwise ungodly. 

He said to the Church at Corinth. 
"Know ye not that ye are the tem- 
ple of God, defile not the temple." 
He taught them, that the Spirit of 
God dwelt in them, and that natur- 
al wisdom, or the wisdom of the 
world, was foolishness with God. 
Therefore he said, "Let no man 
glory in men." 

This Church evidently had two 
evils in their midst. First, those 
who had begun in the Spirit, and 
now were teaching that they must 
be made perfect by the deed of the 
law or by the keeping of a law cov- 
enant, and second, they must have 
had some who were fornicators, 
incestuous and otherwise unclean in 
their life. 

To those who were doubtless 
glorying in their own strength, He 
said, "Your glorying is not good." 
Know ye not that a little leaven (a 
little false doctrine and unclean 
living) leaveneth the whole lump, 
or bringeth a stigma upon the body 
or church. 

He said, "Purge out therefore the 
old leaven (the doctrines of the 
Pharisees and Sadducees) that ye 
may be a new lump. (One in 
Christ) as ye are unleavened (new 
creatures in Christ Jesus, set apart, 
sanctified, worshipping God in 
Spirit and in Truth, having no con- 
fidence in the flesh.) "For even 
Christ, our Passover, is sacrificed 



10 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



for us; therefore let us keep the 
feast not with the old leaven or law 
worship." 

The Pharisees and Sadducees 
came and tempted Him asking a 
sign. They had no faith in Christ, 
therefore Jesus said a wicked and 
adulterous generation seeketh after 
a sign. I "aid unto His disciples, 
theref ? lieed and beware 

of the oi the Pharisees and 

Sadducees." 

His disciples said or reasoned 
among themselves, saying it is be 
cause we have taken no ' ro"^ T 
.lad n^t ' 
then 

dcj rei.iem,.cr ...e 

fiw e five thousand, 

neitiiii iLie seven loaves .of the four 
thousand and how many baskets 
ye took up?" "How is it that ye do 
not understand that I spake not it 
concerning bread (literal bread) 
that you should beware of the 
leaven of the Pharisees and Sad- 
ducees." 

"^"Then they understood how He 
had bid them beware of the doc- 
trines of the Pharisees and Sad- 
ducees. Matthew 16th. Chapter, 
Who among us have not heard a lit- 
tle of the false doctrine of the 
leaven of the Pharisees and Saddu- 
cees spoil what otherwise seemed to 
be a good sermon? 

We will not take space to enlarge 
on the doctrines of Pharisees and 
Sadducees, except to say that nei- 
ther was in harmony with the un- 
leavened bread or doctrines of the 
Lord Jesus Christ. 

Referring again to the first scrip- 
tures named in the heading. Paul 
says, "I wrote to you, in an epistle, 
not to keep company with fornica- 
tors; yet not altogether with forni- 



cators of this world, or with covet- 
ous or extortioners, or with idola- 
ters, for then (ye) must needs go 
out of the world; but now I have 
written you not to keep company, if 
any man is called a brother be a 
fornicator, or covetous, or an idola- 
ter, or a railer, or a drunkard, or an 
extortioner, with such an one no 
not to eat. Put away from your- 
selves such wicked person." 

I^aul thus explains, what we all 
know, that: if we walk not nor in 
any v/ay associate with such wicked 
t> , de as he describes, we would 
oat of the world; but in 
; i.,h he now writes, he 
ji/ clear that there is a 
>\;ry marked distinction between 
having to live amidst the wicked- 
ness of the world and in the pro- 
priety of tolerating and eating with 
one who is called a brother and 
who is leading such an ungodly life. 
Yours in hope, 

0. J. DENNY. 



THE LORD GOD AND THE LAMB. 

And I saw no temple therein, for 
the Lord God Almighty and the 
Lamb are the temple of it. — Rev. 
21:22. 

This scripture is a part of John's 
description of the Bride, the Lamb's 
wife, as shown him by the angel in 
the 9th verse he says, one of the an- 
gels which had the seven vials full 
of the seven last plagues, talked 
with me, saying, Come hither, I will 
show thee the bride, the Lamb's 
wife. 10th verse. And he carried 
me away in the spirit to a great and 
high mountain, and shewed me that 
great city, the holy Jerusalem, de- 
scending out of heaven from God. 
We notice here that John was car- 
ried away in the spirit, otherwise he 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



11 



could not have seen the kingdom of 
God, the church or bride of Christ. 
And it is from a great and high 
mountain that he was able to see 
this beautiful city, built of such cost- 
ly material, typical of the precious 
life blood of the Lamb of God, 
which He so freely shed of Calvary 
for the salvation of His people. Also 
of the perfect righteousness with 
which He clothes them as His bride. 
John from his high perch beside fhe 
angel has a clear view of the holy 
city, and tells us not only of her 
beauty, but also of her strength. It 
had a wall great and high, and this 
wail is of Jasper, which is clear as 
crystal, so that the inside as well as 
the outside can be seen. "The 
King's daughter is all glorious with- 
in; her clothing is of wrought 
gold." This is the Lamb's wife, the 
holy Jerusalem, the church of the 
living God, and Jesus is the builder 
of it and John was permitted to see 
it, and outside and inside it is beau- 
tiful and perfect, and he says, "And 
I saw no temple therein. No, the, 
church of our Lord needs none of 
the institutions of men. They 
could add nothing to it. The Lord's 
work is perfect. Jesus said, "Upon 
this rock I will build my church, 
and the gates of hell shall not pre- 
vail against it. The rock is him- 
self, the tried stone, the chief cor- 
nerstone, spoken of by Isaiah the 
prophet. The works of Jesus being 
perfect and the works of man im- 
perfect, it would mar the perfect 
work to add imperfection to it. Let 
men and the world have their works 
but let the Zion of our God bear the 
marks of the handiwork of Jesus 
alone. 

"Except the Lord build the house, 
they labor in vain that build it. 



Psalms. Sometimes I become dis- 
couraged because so few come into 
the churches. Then I think that if 
I could build a church, what would 
it amount to. It would be a vain 
labor. It could not glorify Jesus, 
whom I trust I love as my Saviour. I 
want him glorified and no hand 
save his own can do it in the build- 
ing of His habitation. Ye are the 
temple of the living God. John 
says. He shall be with you and He 
shall be in you. 

We learn in our daily experience 
that to have life, to enjoy life, to 
have an appetite for the bread of 
life, to be enabled to do things in 
the kingdom of God, which consist 
in ministrations one to another, all 
is the fruit of His holy spirit, for He 
said, Without me ye can do nothing. 
Then we do not want to build any 
temple in the beautiful city, (the 
church) as it would mar her beauty 
and dishonor her King, who is her 
builder, and shall bear all the glory. 
"The Lord God Almighty and the 
Lamb are the temple of it." "Lord 
thou hast been our dwelling place 
in all generations." It is in Him 
we live, and move and have our 
being. Jesus said, I in you, and 
you in me, and I in the Father. 
Why should those who dwell in 
such a magnificent temple as this 
which a heart of love has built with 
the hands of wisdom, desire to dwell 
in a shack of their own construc- 
tion? Cease ye from man whose 
breath is in his nostrils, his works 
are vain. The Lord God who ap- 
pointed us to obtain salvation 
through our Lord Jesus Christ, and 
the suffering of the Lamb of God 
to the end that those appointed to 
salvation should without fail be 
saved, are the temple of this city, 



12 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



the new Jerusalem, which comes 
down from God out of heaven, and 
the inhabitants of the city are bless- 
ed to feel secure in the promises of 
God the Father, fulfilled by his Son, 
Jesus ChrisL -rd verse. And the 
city had no <:,- sun, neither 
of the mov^ii . in il, for the 

glory of God li;,: liiiulen k, and the 
Lamb is the light thereof, the 
brightest light of the world, the 
ablest of men all sink into insignifi- 
cance unless the light of the Lamb 
shines upon them. Paul may plant 
and Apollus water but God giveth 
the increase. How and when do 
you enjoy the preached gospel? 
When the Lord is pleased to shine 
upon His servant and give you en- 
lightened eyes, and unstopped ears- 
And at such times the preacher 
says and you say. Glory to God in 
the highest, and let him that glori- 
eth glory in the Lord. It is when 
the Lord spreads His glory over His 
church and over his word, and over 
His worshippers, that their mouth is 
filled with laughter, and their ton- 
gue with singing, and they say to 
Him be glory now and forever. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



MISS JANE JOHNSON. 

By request of her niece, I will in my 
weak way try to write a few lines in lov- 
ing memory of one of our dear sisters, Miss 
Jane Johnson, my aunt by marriage. 

The deceased was born June 1, 1849, 
and departed this life April 20, 1930, 
making her stay on earth 81 years, 10 
months and 20 days. 

Aunt Jane was a member of the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church at Lower Town Creek. 
I do not know the date of her baptism. 
She was a member long before I knew her 
and was known and loved my many. She 
was a faithful member and filled her seat 
just as long as she was able to go to 
church. 

She was a great sufferer for many years, 
but was up most of the time. She loved 
her home and garden so much that it was 
hard for her to give it up and go to live 
with someone else, which she did about 
two years ago, when her health became so 



bad that she could not keep house any 
longer. She went to live with her niece, 
Mrs. Earl Harper, and made her home 
there tor most of the remainder of her 
days. She came to stay with us some last 
summer and was very feeble most of the 
time. She would talk about Jesus, her 
Saviour, and said at times that he was 
gone and she was in darkness, but if she 
could have His presence in the last hour, 
death would not be so hard. 

One night while she was staying with 
us she told me some of her experience 
which I didn't remember ever hearing her 
tell before, and it was so good and bright 
it made me feel as if I didn't have any- 
thing at all. I enjoyed her company very 
much and she spoke many words of com- 
fort and encouragement to me when I 
was cast down, and almost ready to give 
up in despair. 

She was an industrious and intelligent 
woman and could give good advice to 
those around her and was ever ready to 
lend a helping hand to those in need. 

Now that she is gone and leaves us all 
behind, we miss her very much, but we 
mourn not as those without hope for we 
feel that she is sweetly resting in heaven 
with Jesus whom she loved and trusted 
and whom I believe must have been with 
her in the hour of death for those around 
her bedside said she passed away so quiet- 
ly and knew everything and realized she 
was dying and told them so. 

Her funeral was conducted by her pas- 
tor. Elder A. M. Crisp and Elder Joe 
Smith. They spoke many words of com- 
fort to those left behind. Her body was 
laid to rest in the Johnson burying ground 
to await the resurrection morn when all 
the saints shall meet in heaven. 

Written by one who loved her. 

LULA J. CUMMINGS 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Mrs. John Anna Harris, the daughter 
of Mr. Berry Norville and Mrs. Vina Nor- 
ville, was born in Edgecombe County, in 
the year of our Lord, 1866, and departed 
this life April 5th, 1929. 

She was married at the age of 21 years, 
to Mr. Peyton Harris, who preceded her 
to the grave by a few years. There were 
born to this union eight children, two boys 
and six girls. To them were born thirteen 
giving her thirteen grand children. 

Sister Harris was a good woman, and 
received a blessed hope in her Saviour in 
early life, and in the year of 1923 she 
went to the church at Old Sparta on the 
fourth Sunday in July and related what 
the Lord had done for her, and was re- 
ceived into the full fellowship of the 
church, and on the fourth Sunday in Au- 
gust was baptised by her pastor. Elder E. 
L. Cobb. A large crowd gathered at the 
water to witness the performance. 

She remained a very satisfactory mem- 
ber of the church until death, and was 
always found rendering favor to the sick. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



13 



and as much as she could to the needs of 
others, and was beloved by all that knew 
her. Her funeral was conducted in the 
church house at Old Sparta by Elder J. L. 
Ross, as Elder E. L. Cobb was sick in bed 
and could not attend. 

This is done by order o£ conference the 
fourth Saturday in Sept. 27, 1930. 

Leonard Raper, Moderator, 
E. P. Williamson, Clerk, 
E. W. Gladson, Writer. 

RESOLUTION OF RESPECT. 

Whereas, it has pleased our heavenly 
Father, to take out of this world our 
highly esteemed Brother and Elder T. C. 
West. We don't mourn as those without 
hope. For we feel that our loss is his 
eternal gain in heaven. 

He was loyal to his Church, serving as 
Deacon and Clerk, both with humble- 
ness, kindness and love, until the Lord 
pleased to call him to the ministry of 
which he served so short a while, but so 
precious and dear was his sermons pro- 
claiming the Gospel of Christ that we feel 
it will be everlasting in our memory. He 
was born Sept. 20th, 1877, and died Feb- 
ruary 19th, 1930, making his stay on this 
earth 52 years, 4 months, and 29 days. 
He was ordained to the ministry Aug. 4, 
19 29, which he served until death. Al- 
ways lending a helping hand to the poor 
and needy. Weep not dear wife and chil- 
dren. On earth we'll see him no more, 
but soon we hope to meet him on the 
happy Canaan Shore. 

Written by request of Tarboro Church. 

Elder J. B. Roberts, Moderator 
H. C. Brown, Clerk. 

SARAH J. WILLIAMS. 

Whereas it was the will of our Heavenly 
Father to remove from our midst our sis- 
ter Sarah J. Williams, Oct. 2nd 1930 at 
the age of 69 years, 10 months, 15 days, 
having been a member of this church for 
many years in good faith and good stand- 
ing. Therefore be it resolved by this 
church: 1st. That the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Smithwick's Creek desires to ex- 
press our sprrow and sadness at the loss 
of our sister and our sympathy to the be- 
•eav^d family; but we hope and trust that 
we are ever willing to submit to the 
rlivine will of God. Her body has been 
consigned to the tomb and her spirit to 
the God who gave it. The Lord gave and 
the Lord hath taken away, blessed be the 
name of the Lord. Job 1:20. 2nd, That 
the clerk be required to record a copy of 
this resolution on our minute book and 
also send a copy to the family and a copy 
to Zion's Landmark for publication. This 
resolution unanimously adopted in con- 
ference Saturday before the 2nd Sunday in 
October, 1930. 

Elder Jno. N. Rogerson, Mod. 

A. D. Griffin, Sr., Clerk. 



ELDER C. A. DAVIS 

By the request of his dear companion, 
I will try to write a sketch of the life and 
death of our beloved brother, Cornelius 
Addison Davis. He was born June the 
30th, 1852, and died September 29th, 
1929, age 77 years, 2 months and 29 
days. He was married to Estella A. 
Welch, Feb. 4th, 1883. To this union 
were born 6 children, as follows, 4 sons 
and 2 daughters, W. J. and C. A. Davis, of 
Houston, Texas; John R., of Kernersville, 
Route 1, and C. Lester of High Point, R. 4, 
Mrs. M. B. Hedgecock of Kernersville, R. 1 
and Mrs. J. H. Hicks of High Point. Also 
3 2 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild 
survive. He joined the Abbott's Creek 
Primitive Baptist Church in August 1905, 
and was ordained to the full work of the 
ministry, June 1907. He was the son of 
William and Kizzie Wheeler Davis. At 
his request Elders O. J. Denny, J. A. Fagg, 
H. S. Williams, and M. L. Williard were 
to have conducted funeral service. He 
passed away just as the sun was sinking 
'neath the western horizon. I have known 
Brother Davis for more than 40 years. He 
was a wonderful man in his community 
and in his county. He was magistrate for 
several years in his younger days, and 
served as county commissioner for 2 or 3 
terms, and his friends at one time talked 
of running him for sheriff, but in that, for 
certain reasons, he did not give them 
much encouragement. He was a hard 
working man, until he was ordained to 
preach the gospel, after that he began 
serving churches, in that, and attending 
funerals, he spent a lot of his time, con- 
tending earnestly for the truth, he knew 
no theme, but Jesus Christ, the way, the 
truth and the life. He never advocated 
anything that caused any confusion among 
the brethren. He made friends wherever 
he went. The Apostle John tells us he 
heard a voice from heaven saying, "Write 
blessed are the dead that die in the Lord." 
Now we believe without a doubt that this 
dear brother was in the Lord, in hope 
and in confidence. So I will say to his 
bereaved family, and all of his friends, 
when we think of Iv'ni. '" i-ik of the bless- 
ed death that ho ' ' lat he is now 
resting from r ' He fought 
the good fight r, r , holieve that 
he has gone (o • v.vii of glory 
which was laid in l- ■ 

A!. L. \/.lLLIARD, 
High Point, N. C, R. 2. 

RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 
Whereas it has been the v,'ill of Almighty 
God to remove from our midst by death 
our dear Brother C :o. M. ^n;' h, who died 
suddenly on the ■ ■ > -'y 31st. He 

Avas in usual Ik;: >vork when 

he was gently 'li . me and en- 

tered into etsvni:. . now resting 

from his labors. ; : _ r Smith was a 
meek, humble, ani wi' . '.n^ brother, loved 
by his church and aliCiiJ. d unless provi- 



14 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



dentially hindered. Therefore be it re- 
solved, 

While we are grieved at our loss we be- 
lieve it to be his gain, and desire to be 
reconciled to the will of God who makes 
no mistakes. 

2nd. We extend to his family our deep- 
est sympathy, hoping they will be given 
grace sufficient for this and all other 
trials. 

3rd. That a copy of the Resolutions 
be placed on our church Book and a copy 
be sent to Zion's Landmark for publication. 

Done by order of Conference at Great 
Swamp Church, Aug. 23rd, 1930. 

S. B. DENNY, Moderator, 
LENA HARRINGTON, Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OP RESPECT. 

Whereas God in his infinite wisdom has 
seen fit to remove from us our beloved 
pastor, Elder J. J. Hall, one who has faith- 
fully served the church at Helena, N. C. 
since its organization 22 years ago, last 
June and died July 24, 1930: 

We desire to bow in humble submission 
to our Heavenly Father who works all 
things after the council of His own will, 
feeling that our loss is his eternal gain. 

Therefore be it resolved: 

1st. That in the passing of our beloved 
pastor, we feel that the church has lost a 
faithful leader, one who loved the church 
and worked for the peace of Zion. 

2nd. That his companions and children 
have lost a kind and affectionate husband 
and father and his community a good citi- 
zen. 

May the God of all grace comfort his 
bereaved family and his many brethren, 
sisters and friends. 

3rd. That a copy of these resolutions be 
spread on our church record, a copy sent 
to the bereaved family and a copy to 
Zion's Landmark for publication. 

Read and approved in Conference Sept. 
6th., 1930. 

Elder L. J. Chandler, Mod. 
J. M. Rogers, Clerk. 



MARY E. WARREN 

It is with a sad heart that we attempt 
to write the obituary of our dear mother, 
sister and friend, Mary Etta Warren, 
widow of the late Stanley Warren, who 
preceded her to the grave four months 
ago. 

To this union seven children were born, 
five of whom survive, two girls and three 
boys. She leaves to mourn her loss be- 
sides her children, many grandchildren, 
and friends. But we feel that our loss is 
her eternal gain. 

She departed this life, August 28, 1930, 
making her stay on earth seventy four 
years, eight months and fifteen days. 

This dear sister and mother united with 
the church at Briery Swamp about twenty 
three years ago. She was a loving sister 
and always filled her seat, each and every 
meeting as health permitted. This dear 



mother and sister was confined to her bed 

about three weeks. All was done for her 
loving friends and doctors could do, but 
none could stay the mighty hand of death. 

The funeral was held at the home by 
Elder B. S. Cowan and interment was 
made in the family burying ground. May 
the dear Lord who alone is able to com- 
fort and bless the dear children. May her 
life be an example that they may walk in 
her footsteps ever looking unto Jesus, who 
is the author and finisher of every faith. 

Written by 

Huldah E. Warren, 
Ada M. Leggett 
This done by the order of Conference. 
J. L. Ross, Moderator 
Charlie James Clerk, 
Briery Swamp Church. 



MRS. J. R. COKER 

The subject of this sketch Sarah Fran- 
ces Coker, was born March 7, 1862, died 
May 3rd, 1930. 

Stricken with penumonia she was con- 
fined to her bed five days, but bore her 
last sickness as she did her former afflic- 
tions with Christian fortitude; and ex- 
pressed a desire to depart and be with 
Christ; but manifested that faith which 
works by love, purifies the heart and over- 
comes the world. She confessed a hope in 
Christ and united with the Primitive Bap- 
tist Church at Hopeland Church in Whita- 
kers, and was baptized by her pastor. El- 
der A. J. Moore, May 1903, where she re- 
mained a faithful member and always fill- 
od her s-^at unless providentially hindered 
until death. Her companion Brother, J. 
R. Coker, v/ith whom she lived happily 
about 50 j^ears, preceded her to the grave 
15 years ago. She leaves seven children, 
as follows: Walter Coker and Mrs. Bun- 
yon Walston of Richmond, Va., Jessie and 
Julius Coker and Mrs. Baker Sexton of En- 
field, N. C, Mrs. W. H. Fowlkes of Rocky 
Mount, N. C, and Mrs. J. J. Harrell of 
Burlington, N. C. Also leaves three sis- 
ters, and one brother, besides relatives 
anu friends; all of whom will miss her 
gentle spirit, which has taken its ever- 
lasting flight to God who gave it; to that 
inheritance that is incorruptible and un- 
defiled and that fadeth not away. 

After kind hands and loving friends 
had done what they could and a short 
service at her home by her pastor, her 
body was gently lowered and buried in the 
grave in Enfield cemetery, there to await 
the morning of the resurrection. 

May those left behind follow her exam- 
ple and realize that she has entered into 
that rest which remalneth to the people of 
God. 

J. C. MOORB. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 
Whereas our Heavenly Father in his in- 
finite wisdom has called our beloved bro- 
ther, Elder C. A. Davis, to his eternal 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



15 



home, be it therefore resolved, 

First, that the church at Abbott's Creek 
has sustained the loss of a much devoted 
and a most faithful member, yet, we de- 
sire !o be submissive to the will of God, 
who has called him to his eternal home. 

Second, That we extend our sympathy to 
the bereaved family. May God's richest 
blessing be with them. And that they 
might be kept and preserved by that 
same power that kept him. That the 
church might be ever mindful of that coun- 
cil and walk in it. 

Third, That these resolutions be placed 
on our minutes, a copy sent to Zion's 
Landmark, and a copy sent to the family. 

Done by order of the church on Satur- 
day before the first Sunday in November, 
1929. 

Elder H. S. Williams, Moderator 
John R. Davis, Clerk. 



GEORGE C. WILKINS 

George C. Wilkins was born May the 7th 
1848. He was married Feb. 10th., 1870 
to Zilpha A. Quinn. To this union were 
born nine children, six dead and three 
living. 

Whereas the good Lord saw fit to re- 
move him on November the 7th., 1929, 
from this sinful world and call him "Child 
come home." Our dear brother leaves 
three children to mourn after him, two 
boys and one girl, Mr. James H. and Wal- 
ter M. Wilkins and Mrs. Sudie Brown. 

Brother Wilkins lived a peaceful life. 
He united with the Primitive Baptist 
church at Sand Hill, Duplin County, N. C, 
and later on moved his membership to 
lu'idy Creole where it remained until his 
death. We feel the church has lost a 
faithful and able member. He was 
staunch In the doctrine and kept the faith, 
always filling his seat. I never knew him 
to fail as long as he lived. Brother Wil- 
kins loved the cause of Christ and I never 
was with him long before he would com- 
mence talking about the condition of the 
churches and telling of the wonderful 
trials that he had seen and been through 
and I don't think I ever saw a maij with 
more patience. It looked like rejoicing 
with him all the time, only when trouble 
would arise in the church he would grieve 
and lament. He was a beloved brother 
and had a host of friends. If he had one 
enemy white or black it was unknown. 
Brother Wilkins in his former days work- 
ed up a good living, and was a wonderful 
neighbor and a true citizen to his country 
and he enjoyed reading The Landmark 
and was a regular subscriber as long as he 
lived. He suffered very little before the 
summons came which was very easy. 

So we can say the church has lost a 
faithful and highly esteemed soldier of the 
cross, so we say with sad hearts, weep not 
children for our loss is his eternal gain. 
His dear companion was called to her long 
and peaceful home in 1920. They always 
had a good home for the Baptists, and 



friends very often talked about his won- 
derful hope; often talked about the great 
blessings the good Lord had bestowed up- 
on him and his family. He raised a good 
family, all peaceable and kind. I never 
met kinder people in my life. 

S!( <>p on, dear one, sleep on. 
And take your eternal rest 
T'pon your Saviour's bosom. 
Where His saints are ever blest. 

Written by, 

L. A. BRINSON, 

Beulaville, N. C. 



LOWER COUNTRY UNION 

The Lower Country Union will be held 
the Lord willing, with the church at Ross- 
es, Durham Co., on the 5th Sunday and 
Saturday before in November, 1930. 
Brethren, sisters and friends are cordially 
invited to come and be with us, especially 
ministers. 

This church building is located about 
two miles east of Durham, N. C. 

A. P. Clayton, Union Clerk 



LINVILLE UNION 

The next session of the Linville Union 
is appointed to be held with the Pi imitive 
Baptist Church in Burlin^toTi ^ Caro- 

lina, on Saturday an^" ' ' ay in 

November, 1930. 

We extend an invitatioi: ; ' hren. 
Sisters and Friends to meet with us. A 
special invitation is extended to our Min- 
isters to meet with us on this occasion. 

W. L. TEAGUB. 



RLACK RIVER UNION 

The next session of the Black River 
Union is appointed *-o i;r h ' - h the 
church at Black River meetir.s m use in 
town of Dunn, N. C, on the 5th Sunday 
and Saturday before in November, 1930. 
Good roads from all sections lead into the 
town. A general Invitation extended to 
all lovers of truth. 

W. V. BLACKMAN, Clerk, 
Benson, N. C, R. 2. 



THE EASTERN UNION. 

The Eastern Union is appointed to meet 
with the Church at North Creek to com- 
mence Saturday before the 5th Sunday in 
November. The church is on the road 
leading from Belhaven to Bath about eight 
miles from Belhaven. Invitation Is ex- 
tended to all who have a mind to come, 
especially ministers in gospel order. 

A. W. AMBROSE, Clerk. 



16 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



UNION MEETING AT ANGIER 

The next session of the Angier Union is 
appointed to be held with the Church at 
Angier, Harnett County, Saturday and 
fifth Sunday in November, 1930. Elder T. 
F. Adams is chosen to preach the introduc- 
tory sermon and Elder E. C. Jones is alter- 
nate. 

Angier Church is located In the town of 
Angier, a station on the Durham & South- 
ern Ry., and also on State Highway num- 
ber 210. 

All lovers of Truth are invited to meet 
with us, especially the ministering breth- 
ren. 

W. F. YOUNG. 

Union Clerk. 

Angier, N. C. 



APPOINTMENTS 
Elder Tilman Sawyer will preach, the 
Lord willing at the following time and 
places. 

Wilmington, Nov. 24, at night. 
Stump Sound Nov. 25. 
Yopps, Nov. 26. 
Bay, Nov. 27. 
Southwest, Nov. 28. 
Cypress Creek, Nov. 29. 
Muddy Creek, Nov. 30. 
Sandhill, Dec. 1. 

R. W. Gurganus, 
Jacksonville, N. C. 



THE CONTENTNEA UNION. 

The 227th session of the Contentnea 
Union was appointed to be held with the 
church at Nahunta, Wayne Co., N. C. the 
fifth Saturday and Sunday in November, 
1929. 

Elder A. M. Crisp was chosen to preach 
the introductory sermon and Elder W. B. 
Kearney as alternate. 

Nahunta Church is situated in Wayne 
County, about 10 miles east of Goldsboro 
% mile west of 102 highway. 

A special invitation is extended our 
ministering brethren. 

J. E. Mewborn, Union Clerk. 
Snow Hill, N. C. 



FISHER'S RIVER UNION 

The Fisher's River Union meeting will 
be held with Union church which is located 
twelve miles west of Pilot Mountain, on 
the fifth Saturday and Sunday in Novem, 
ber, 1930. A cordial Invitation is extend- 
ed. 

C. W. STONE, 

Rockford, N. C. 



UPPER COUNTRY LINE UNION 
The next session of the Upper Country 
Line Union will be held the Lord willing 
with the church at New Hope, Rocking- 
ham Co., N. C, on the 5th Sunday and 
Saturday before in Nov. 1930. 

The public is cordially invited to attend 
especially ministers. 

W. C. King, Union Clerk. 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, 
MANAGEMENT, CIRCULATTON, 
ETC., REQUESTED BY THE 
ACT OF CONGRESS OF 
AUGUST 24, 1912. 
Of the Zion's Landmark, published twice 
a month at Wilson, N. C, Oct. 1, 1930. 
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, 

COUNTY OF WILSON, 
ss. 

Before me, a Notary Public for the 
State and County aforesaid, personally ap- 
peared John D. Gold, who, having been 
duly sworn according to law, deposes and 
says that he is Business Manager of Zion's 
Landmark and that the following is, to the 
best of his knowledge and belief, a true 
statement of ownership, management (and 
if a daily paper, the circulation), etc., of 
the aforesaid publication for the date 
shown in the above caption, required by 
the Act of August 24, 1912, embodied in 
section 443, Postal Laws and Regulations, 
printed on the reverse of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of 
the publisher, editor, managing editor, and 
business managers are: 

Publisher P. D. Gold Publishing Co., 
Wilson, N. C. 

Editors, Elder O. J. Denny, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. Elder J. T. Rowe, Baltimore, 
Md., Elder M. L. Gilbert, Dade City, Fla., 
and Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 

Business Manager, John D. Gold, Wil- 
son, N. C. 

2. That the owners are: P. D. Gold 
Publishing Co., John D. Gold. 

3. That the known bondholders, mort- 
gagees, and other security holders owning 
or holding 1 per cent or more of total 
amount of bonds, mortgages, or other 
securities are: First National Bank, L. S. 
Hadley. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, 
giving the names of the owners, stockhold- 
ers, and security holders, if any, contain 
not only the list of stockholders and se- 
curity holders as they appear upon the 
books of the company but also, in cases 
where the stockholders or security holder 
appears upon the books of the company as 
trustee or in any other fiduciary relation, 
the name of the person or corporation for 
whom such trustee is acting, is given; also 
that the said two paragraphs contain state- 
ments embracing affiant's full knowledge 
and belief as to the circumstances and con- 
ditions under which stockholders and se- 
curity holders who do not appear upon the 
books of the company as trustees, hold 
stock and securities in a capacity other 
than that of a bona fide owner; and this 
affiant has no reason to believe that any 
other person, association, or corporation 
has any interest direct or other securities 
than as so stated by him. 

JOHN D. GOLD, 
Sworn to and subscribed to before me 
this 20th day of Oct. 1930. 
ELIABETH S. CLARKE, Notary Public. 
My Comm. expires April 18, 1931. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

= AT ^ 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLh !• H,^ 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTi^ 

VOL. LXIV. DECEMBER 1, 1930 No. 2 



ELIJAH TAKEN UP INTO HEAVEN. 



"And it came to pass, when the Lord would take up Elijah into Heaven 
by a whirlwind, that Elijah went with Elisha from Gilgal. 

And Elijah said unto Elisha tarry here I pray thee, for the Lord hath 
sent me to Bethel. And Elisha -said unto him, as the Lord liveth, I will 
not leave thee. So they went down to Bethel. 

And Elijah said unto him Elisha, tarry here I pray thee; for the Lord 
hath sent me to Jericho. And he said as the Lord liveth, and as thy soul 
liveth I will not leave thee so they came to Jericho. 

And fifty men of the sons of the prophets went and stood to view afar 
off: and they too stood by Jordan. 

And Elijah took his mantle and wrapped it together, and smote the 
waters, and they were divided hither, and thither so that the two went 
over on dry ground. 

And it came to pass when they were gone over that Elijah said unto 
Elisha, Ask what I shall do for thee, before I be taken away from thee. 
And Elisha said, I pray thee let a double portion of thy spirit be upon me. 

And it came to pass, as they still went on and talked, that behold there 
appeared a chariot of fire, and horses of fire, and parted them asunder 
and Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven." — 2 Kings, 2:1-11. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS , 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 

$2.00 PER YEAR ' 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR * 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. 0. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 



Wilson, N. C. 



SepoteD to the Clause of S-esus Cbdst 



GRAFTED INTO CHRIST. 

"Thou wert cut out of the Olive 
tree which is wild by nature, and 
wert grafted contrary to nature into 
a Good Olive Tree." — Rom. 11:24. 

The apostle Paul speaking to the 
Gentile believers concerning their 
salvation in, and union to Jesus 
Christ, and partaking of His full- 
ness, describes their blessedness by 
a figure in earthly husbandry. Here 
is the story of God's goodness to- 
ward these chosen Gentiles whom 
God took out of the nations a peo- 
ple for His name, Acts 15:14. "Thou 
wert cut out of the Olive tree which 
is wild by nature, and wert grafted 
contrary to nature into a good Olive 
Tree." As I contemplated this pic- 
ture I thought I could see in it the 
dealings of the Holy Ghost in bring- 
ing chosen Gentiles unto the knowl- 
edge of Jesus Christ, and the bless- 
edness of our union to him. 

The whole subject embraced in 
this chapter I will not now touch 
upon, but rather tell you some 
things that I see in this one verse. 
"A wild Olive tree," Rom. 11:17. 
The Gentiles were likened to this. 
There it grows, uncared for, bear- 
ing its wild fruit, undesired, de- 
spised, wild. What are we by na- 
ture? Sinners of the Gentiles, 
without God, without Christ, with- 
out hope in the world ; Ephes. 2 :12. 
We were alienated from the life of 
God through the ignorance that is 
in us because of the blindness of our 
hearts. Vile, base, transgressors, 



enemies of God by wicked works, 
by nature the children of wrath, 
even as others, under the curse of 
the law, such is the Bible descrip- 
tion of us ; wild by nature, and bear- 
ing only wild fruit. 

Can any branch of this wild Olive 
tree so cultivate itself as to bring 
forth desirable fruit unto God? If 
it could what self-boasting there 
would be. "For if Abraham were 
justified by works, he hath whereof 
to glory ; but not before God," Rom. 
4:2. 

The branches of the wild Olive 
tree can only bring forth wild fruit. 
"Do men gather grapes of thorns, 
or figs of thistles?" Matt. 7:16. "A 
wild Olive tree." Sinners. We 
were servants of sin, free from 
righteousness, we were all unright- 
eousness. "A wild Olive tree." 
Prune it. dress it, dung it, make it 
flourish and it is still nothing but a 
Wild Olive Tree. 

O, it is in gratitude of heart and 
glorying in the Lord when believers 
join with the apostle, saying, "By 
the grace of God I am what I am," 
and the abounding riches of God's 
grace are more and more felt as we 
look unto the rock whence we are 
hewn, and to the hole of the pit 
whence we were digged, Isaiah 
51:1. Lot)k into the abyss of sin, 
of condemnation, of the curse of the 
law. But the Lord quarried us out, 
hewed us from the rock, and 
brought us up out of the hole of the 
pit. "You hath he quickened, who 



18 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



were dead in trespasses and sins." 
The "lively stones." 1 Peter 2:5. 
God hews them, by the prophets, 
by the words of His mouth, cutting 
them, putting them into shape, 
bringing them by His divine teach- 
ings, by faith, of the operation of 
God unto Christ, the living Founda- 
tion. Yes, child of God, he useth 
His iron tools upon thee, and all 
thy soul's afflictions, all thy bitter, 
humbling knowledge of thyself as a 
sinner, all thy sighs, contriteness of 
heart, thy weeping and supplica- 
tions are in the pathway unto him 
who is the Rock of our Salvation. 

The vessels of mercy are afore 
prepared unto glory, and when in 
the last day the Lord shall descend 
from heaven, and raise us up from 
the dead, immortal, incorruptible, 
and we shall be in spirit and soul 
and body blameless in all things 
conformed to the image of God's 
dear Son, it will still be in adoring 
gratitude of our hearts our glorying 
to say, "By the grace of God I am 
what I am." 

"Thou wert cut out of the Olive 
tree which is wild by nature." God 
knows where all His elect are in all 
nations and kindreds, tongues and 
peoples, and in the fulness of time 
He takes them unto Himself, He 
calls them by His grace, to bring 
them into living intimacy with Jesus 
Christ, the Son of his love. God 
who cannot lie, promised them in 
Christ, their covenant Head, and or- 
dained them unto eternal life in 
Him before the foundation of the 
world. Titus 1 :2, Acts 13 :48. So 
in the set time in His counsel, the 
Lord, the heavenly husbandman, 
comes in everlasting love, and His 
almighty gracious hand takes hold 
of a branch of the wild Olive tree, 



and with His sharp knife cuts out 
that branch He has taken hold of. 
Men may talk of laying hold of 
Christ, but what can they tell of 
being apprehended of Christ Jesus? 
Phil 3:12. No one ever was found 
to lay hold of the hope set before 
us, unless the Lord first laid hold of 
them. "I follow after, if that I 
may apprehend that for which also 
I am apprehended of Christ Jesus." 

God takes hold of the branch 
and cuts it out of the wild Olive 
tree. While thus held in the hand 
of God, and his sharp knife is cut- 
ting us out, we cannot then realize 
that we are in the gracious hands 
of the Lord, and that all the sharp 
cuttings are in all graciousness, ac- 
cording to his purpose and grace 
given us in Christ Jesus before the 
world began. "Thou wert cut out." 
Other branches were left. O my 
soul, what distinguishing mercy! 
How sovereign is the grace of God ! 
Had not God's electing love taken 
hold of the poor sinner, and cut 
thee out, thou hadst still been with- 
out God, without Christ, and with- 
out hope in the world. In contem- 
plation of this my spiirt is humbled 
before the Lord; self-esteem and 
self-pity, and fleshly vaunting are 
supressed, and my heart in its fer- 
vent gratitude is saying, "Even so. 
Father, for so it seemed good in thy 
sight." "Thou wert cut out." That 
sharp knife is the word of God, 
which is quick and powerful, 
sharper than any two-edged sword. 
Heb. 4:12. It is the word that 
God speaks in the soul that cuts us 
out, takes us out of the Gentiles a 
people for His name. His word, 
his truth takes hold of and cuts its 
way into the heart and conscience 
of the wild olive sinner. The doc- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



19 



trine of the Lord cut, sharp convic- 
tions of sin are felt, and all the 
sharp cuttings of God's truth are to 
put the quickened sinner into shape 
to be grafted into Christ. Watch 
the husbandman cutting and shap- 
ing the wild Olive branch that he 
holds in his hand. I will say, He 
eyes it tenderly, his thoughts are 
gracious, for the Lord, the heavenly, 
allwise, almighty husbandman, 
saith, "I will plant them in this land 
assuredly, with my whole heart, 
and with my whole soul." Jer. 
32:41. I have known trees to be 
grafted, but though the scions were 
well selected, and the wisdom and 
skill of the husbandman were 
brought into requisition, yet some- 
times some of the grafted scions did 
not live, the work of man was a fail- 
ure. But when God, the Holy 
Ghost, takes hold and cuts out of 
the wild Olive tree a branch, and 
engrafts it into Christ, the good 
Olive Tree, there is no failure. Ev- 
ery one so engrafted into Christ 
lives to the everlasting praise of the 
Lord, and not all the powers of 
earth and hell shall be able to undo 
this word of our Covenant God. 

When the wild Olive branch has 
been so shaped to fit into the place 
prepared for it, the gracious wise 
husbandman puts it into its place, 
and the cleft in the Good Olive Tree 
takes a firm hold of it. The Good 
Olive Tree was clef for those who 
were cut out of the wild Olive tree. 
This Cleft Olive Tree is our pre- 
cious, wounded, bleeding, crucified 
Savior. Moses was put into the 
cleft of the Rock, Exodus 33:32, 
and the dove has her sanctuary 
there, Song of Solomon 2 :14. 

Rock of Ages, cleft for me, 
Let me hide myself in Thee." 



Look at that cleft in the Good 
Olive Tree held open to receive the 
branch of the wild Olive tree, or 
rather Christ Crucified, the cleft, 
smitten, wounded, bleeding, cruci- 
fied for thee. Crucified for me? 
Can it be? Many give their assent 
unto and profess to have knowledge 
of points of doctrine, but what heart 
intimacy have they with Christ and 
Him crucified. O, I have felt for 
many years that it is all essential to 
me, a poor, vile sinner, to have ex- 
perimental intimacy with the cruci- 
fied Jesus Christ. 

The called of God are made alive 
to their sinnership, and to their 
perishing condition as transgressors 
of the law. In the hand of the Lord 
their hearts become wounded, smit- 
ten and contrite over their woes, 
and under the sharp cuttings of the 
word of God they sigh and cry unto 
God, and are brought with weeping 
and supplications for mercy unto 
Christ the Redeemer. O, when a 
broken hearted sinner and the cru- 
cified Saviour come together there 
is such a uniting as must be exper- 
ienced to be understood. It is only 
poor and perishing, sick and wound- 
ed sinners who have need of or are 
ever joined in faith and love to 
Christ Crucified. 

O, the Cleft Olive Tree, the suf- 
ferings and wounds of Emmanuel 
speak to us the love, and mercy, the 
grace of our God, our hearts are 
taken hold of by the transactions of 
the cross of Christ, there only we 
feel there can be forgiveness, heal- 
ing, life, salvation for a poor perish- 
ing sinner. How precious the truth, 
"For the transgression of my peo- 
ple was he stricken." O, it is in 
covenant graciousness that the Holy 
Ghost moves our hearts to faith in 



20 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



the Crucified One. 

He teaches us, takes of the things 
of Jesus and shows them unto us, 
and we are so wrought of the Com- 
forter that we look to, flee for ref- 
uge to Jesus the dear Lamb of God. 
O, He poured out His soul unto 
death, He was numbered with the 
transgressors, and He bore the sins 
of many, and made intercession for 
transgressors. O, thy heart, 0 
Christ, was rent, and cleft with suf- 

^■•ings for the atonement of our 
thou wast wounded, bruised, 

M'itten and afflicted for our iniqui- 
ties. Here, at thy cross are "Mercy 
streams in streams of blood." 

The wild Olive branch does not 
graft itself into the good Olive Tree, 
neither does the sinner, of a humble 
and contrite heart engraft himeslf 
into Christ Crucified. For those 
motions of his exercised heart to- 
ward the Saviour, his sighs and de- 
sires for forgiveness, his faith, his 
believing by which he enters into 
the things of Christ are all the fruits 
of the operations of the Spirit of 
Truth in his heart. The Good Olive 
Tree takes hold of the Wild Olive 
Branch, O, the smitten, bleeding 
Savior takes hold unto Himself 
those He suffered and died for up- 
on Calvary's Tree. 

"Rock of Ages cleft for me; 
Let me hide myself in Thee." 

We are put into the cleft Good 
Olive Tree, and there held in love 
and to our comfort, health, salva- 
tion, life and growth. "Rooted and 
grounded in Him." Ephes. 3:17. 
This is no fiction I am declaring. 
Though it be but an idle tale to 
some, it is not so to perishing, hum- 
ble, contrite sinners who have been 



l)rought and joined to Christ Cruci- 
ifed. Life is springing up from the 
Cleft Good Olive Tree into the Wild 
Olive Branch, so forgiveness, heal- 
ing and salvation flow up into ever- 
lasting life from our precious Sav- 
iour. Thus we experience that 
Christ Crucified is the power of God 
and the wisdom of God. O sacred, 
refreshing, saving power. Thou art 
the Fountain of the Water of Life 
precious Jesus. After the tiny Wild 
Olive Branch is put into the- cleft of 
the Good Olive Tree, what then? 
The wise, gracious husbandman 
seals it with a mantle of wax, or 
some other suitable substance. This 
Ifind covering, protecting the graft 
from the storms, from the scorching 
heat of the sun, is all to ensure, is 
all saying that the engrafted branch 
shall live by the upflowing sap, the 
life of the Good Olive Tree. Here 
is something of the signification of 
this in Christ's gospel. Saith the 
apostle, "In whom also after that 
ye believed ye were sealed with the 
Holy Spirit of Promise, which is the 
earnest of our inheritance, until the 
redemption of the purchased pos- 
sess-ion, until the praise of his glory 
Ephes. 1:13-14. The exceeding 
great and precious promises, which 
are yea and amen in Christ Jesus, 
are the assurances of life to the be- 
liever, they are the words of eternal 
life, which only the lips of Jesus can 
speak. John 6:68. This mantle 
of wax, so kindly wrapping up the 
little branch and the big good tree, 
is also significant of the imputed 
righteousness of Christ, which is un- 
to and upon all that believe. The 
Hebrew word "Kaphar" translated 
atonement has the simple, gracious 
meaning "to cover." So the little, in 
itself, worthless Wild Olive Branch 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



21 



grafted into the Good Olive Tree is 
covered with the atonement. "It is 
the blood that maketh an atone- 
ment for the soul." Lev. 17:11. So 
the thus v^rapped up covered Wild 
Olive Branch can sing, 

"Jesus thy blood and righteousness 
My beauty are, my glorious 
dress ; 

Midst flaming worlds, in these ar- 
rayed, 

With joy shall I lift up ray 
head." 

This mantle is taking the Wild 
Olive into wedlock with the Good 
Olive Tree. O how wonderful to 
be in eternal wedlock with the 
Lamb of God, Christ Crucified! 
"Now when I passed by thee, and 
looked upon thee, behold, thy time 
was the time of love; and I spread 
my skirt over thee, and entered into 
a covenant with thee, saith the Lord 
God, and thou becamest mine." 
Ezek. 16:8. "He hath covered me 
with the robe of righteousness." 
Isaiah 61:10. Ruth said to Boaz, 
"Spread therefore thy skirt over 
thine handmaid ; for thou art a near 
kinsman." Ruth 3:9. This is love's 
sealing, loves espousal, the time of 
love. The Holy Ghost, by such 
wonderful, comforting teachings, 
wraps up the believer joined to 
Jesus Christ in the promises of the 
gospel, by the oath and covenant of 
God, by the robe of Emmanuel's 
obedience, by the atonement cover- 
ing, by the love of his espousal, by 
Christ's words of eternal life. How 
assuring and comforting this is to 
the poor sinner. It is all teaching, 
convincing, sealing home to our 
bleeding sin wounded contrite 
hearts that we are one with Christ, 



joined, wedded to the Saviour. Is 
Jesus Christ our hope? Are you 
"bound in the bundle of life with 
the Lord thy God?" I Sam. 25:29. 
The called bf God are sealed unto 
Christ until the day of redemption, 
and thus joined unto him. Our wed- 
ded name is, "The Lord our Right- 
eusness." Jer. 23:6; 33:16. O, it 
is wonderful, so blessed! Our life 
is hid with Christ in God. Col. 3 :2. 
When the sinner is brought unto, 
and grafted into the Crucified Sav- 
iour the winter is past, the gentle 
spring is come, the warm genial sun, 
and the dews of the night, and the 
upspringing life of Christ, the Good 
Olive Tree all say, "Live." Ezek. 
16:6, unto the engrafted Wild Olive 
Branch, and it grows, bearing fruit 
unto the glory of God. The apos- 
'tle Paul in using this figure has been 
careful to tell us that all this spirit- 
ual, heavenly husbandry and the 
fruits thereof are beyond, yea, "con- 
trary to nature." O ye Gentile 
sinners, one with Christ Jesus, ye 
are miracles of Jehovah's grace! 
Thou wert cut out of the wild olive 
tree, yet viewed in Christ, grafted 
into Him, "The Lord called thy 
name, a green olive tree, fair, and 
of goodly fruit." Jer. 11:16. 
Though grafting the Wild Olive 
Branch into the Good Olive Tree is 
contrary to the practice of earthly 
husbandry, yet as a figure of the 
union of Gentile sinners with Christ 
it sets forth one of the sacred mys- 
terious miracles of the gospel of the 
Son of God. Nothing is more dread- 
fully true in the life of a believer in 
Christ than that he is still a poor 
sinful creature. "Thou wert cut 
out of the Wild Olive Tree." Yes, 
and the believer in Jesus will say, I 
feel in my flesh, that I am a Wild 



22 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Olive Branch yet, a wretched, vile 
sinner, who often sighs, mourns un- 
to the Lord over my wild olive base- 
ness, my Adamic nature. But how 
can a Wild Olive Branch, even 
though grafted into the Good Olive 
Tree, bear goodly fruit? This is so 
"contrary to nature." Yes, but it 
is a miracle of grace, wrought of 
God, verily declared in the life of 
faith of that sinner, born of God 
who is joined to Christ. "Jesus 
said, Somebody hath touched me: 
for I perceive that virtue is gone out 
of me." Luke 8:46. So also in all 
the life and growth of the believer 
in the Saviour it is the virtue of the 
Spirit of Christ in the soul that ani- 
mates and is the fountain of our life 
unto our God. Jesus Christ is our 
Root that beareth us; from Him is 
derived our sap, our food; He nour- 
ishes and cherishes the church." 
Saith the apostle Paul, "I am cruci- 
fied with Christ: nevertheless I live; 
yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: 
and the life I now live in the flesh I 
live by the faith of the Son of God, 
who loved me, and gave Himself for 
me." Gal. 2:20. We thrive upon 
Him, for the Holy Spirit takes of the 
things of Christ and shows them 
unto us. We are favored thus to 
live upon Christ's fullness, Christ is 
glorified in our hearts. O, the in- 
numerable sweet thoughts, 
glimpses, refreshings, encourage- 
ments that are ours in Jesus Christ 
by the ministrations of the Com- 
forter, the Holy Ghost. "He shall 
glorify me: for he shall receive of 
me, and show it unto you." "Your 
life is hid with Christ in God." This 
is more than a theory, it is a vital 
reality with true believers in the 
Lamb of God, and the grace of the 
life of Christ in the soul, is love to 



God and to Christ our dear Redeem- 
er; it is sweet gratitude, trust and 
prayer and praise; it is righteous- 
ness and peace and joy in the Holy 
Ghost; it is meekness, gentleness, 
goodness and hope, that maketh not 
ashamed. Thus we are exercised 
toward God our Saviour, and we 
are moved in love and graciousness 
toward the saints in our thoughts 
and words and deeds. Did not our 
Saviour say, "By their fruits ye 
shall know them? And, "Herein 
is my Father glorified, that ye bear 
much fruit; so shall ye be my dis- 
ciples?" 

If then by a miracle of sovereign 
grace we have been cut out of the 
olive tree that is wild by nature, 
and contrary to nature grafted into 
the Good Olive Tree, so the work- 
ing of this same miracle will be the 
life, growth, beauty and goodly 
fruit put forth in us. That person 
who is destitute of longings after 
righteousness and God, that one 
who has no thirsting after Jesus 
Christ, no prayers for forgiveness, 
no trembling at God's word, no 
adoring gratitude for God's salva- 
tion, surely such a professor of 
Christ's name has no vital union 
with Christ. Look also at the out- 
ward life, and enquire. Who are our 
bosom friends, our sought for asso- 
ciates? Do we love the world, the 
things of the world? Have there 
ever been any moments in our lives 
when our hearts in truth were say- 
ing, "God forbid that I should glory, 
save in the cross of our Lord Jesus 
Christ, by whom the world is cruci- 
fied unto me, and I unto the world." 
Gal. 6:14. Again the scriptures 
speak, "They that are Christ's have 
crucified the flesh with the affec- 
tions and lusts." Gal. 5:24. And, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



23 



"Examine yourselves, whether ye 
be in the faith; prove your own 
selves. Know ye not your own 
selves, how that Jesus Christ is in 
you, except ye be reprobates?" 2 
Cor. 13:15. How solemn and 
searching is the word of God! I 
hope I can say I live with the dear 
Saviour; O, I cannot live apart from 
Him. Some give their assent to a 
few points of doctrine, and are con- 
tented, but they have no heartfelt 
knowledge of Jesus. But, I confess 
I am a poor tried sinner; so often I 
am so sick, so plagued with my sin- 
fulness, and temptations of the devil 
that I feel I must have some mo- 
ments of heartfelt communion with 
Jesus. I must seek Him, I must 
find Him, I must cast myself at His 
feet, I will tell Him how wearied, 
how grieved I am, that I implore his 
forgiveness, cleansing, healing, yes, 
victory and comfort through His 
precious atoning blood and justify- 
ing righteousness. Without Christ 
I feel I am undone, as a very cast- 
away. The day to day and year to 
year union of sinners, called by 
grace, to the Saviour is all fruitful 
in this that we learn that the root 
beareth us, that if there is anything 
in us of Christ, any true worship of 
God, and God glorifying fruits in 
our conversation, the source of it 
all is in our union with Christ Cru- 
cified. "Christ liveth in me." Gal. 
2:20. Severed from him we can 
bear no fruit ; he is our sap, our life, 
our All. Col. 3:11. Truly our 
hearts are all acquiescence to that 
voice that saith, "From one is thy 
fruit found." Hosea 14:8. Let me 
continue to tell the mystery which 
no figures or types can ever fully 
tell. While love and adoration are 
springing up, while prayer and 



praise exercise my heart unto the 
Lord, what is this that intrudes, 
that mars my blessedness in Jesus, 
that grieves my spirit, that makes 
me sigh and moan and blush and 
cry? O, it is the dreadful con- 
sciousness that I am a sinful being. 
The most sacred moments are not 
exempt from vain thoughts, vile 
emotions. Ah, I loathe myself, I 
am base, a sinner! 

"My wild olive nature discloses to 
view 

More vileness than I can declare. 
And were not the promises true, 
I'm sure I should sink in despair. 
Fresh succor from Christ I receive, 
Who did all my conflicts foresee, 
And through His rich grace I be- 
lieve. 

He saved a sinner like me." 

Over our wild olive nature we 
have to bemoan ourselves. Israel 
knows the plague of the heart, 1 
Kings 8:38, and after the inward 
man they cry, "O wretched man 
that I am! Who shall deliver me 
from the body of this death? Rom 
7:24. This bitter heartfelt cry is 
only known by believers in Jesus 
Christ. If we are to see the beauty 
of the church of God we must be- 
hold them joined to and one in 
Christ Jesus, the Head of the 
church 

"Would you the church of God sur- 
vey — 

Its beauty, strength and harmony? 
Then Christ Emmanuel see. 
Where all perfections in Him meet. 
There is the church of God com- 
plete ; 
The sum of all is He." 

It is not in the first man Adam, 



24 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



that we are fair and comely, but in 
Christ Jesus, the second man, the 
Lord from heaven. Here the Lord 
commands the blessing, even life 
forevermore, and joined to Christ, 
the Lord our God.saith: "I will be 
as the dew unto Israel: he shall 
grow as the lily, and cast forth his 
roots as Lebanon. His branches 
shall spread, and his beauty shall 
be as the olive tree, and his smell 
as Lebanon, They that dwell un- 
der his shadow shall return; they 
shall revive as the corn, and grow 
as the vine: the scent thereof shall 
be as the wine of Lebanon." Hosea 
14:5-7. 

Frederick W. Keene, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



WISE MEN. 

"I speak as to wise men; judge 
ye what I say." — 1 Cor. 10:15. 

A learned man once said to me, 
"true wisdom is to know that you 
know what you know ; and to know 
that you don't know what you don't 
know." 

Paul, as in our text, did not mean 
that he stood to be judged by wise 
men of this world, for he said, "God 
has made foolish the wisdom of this 
world." He said again, "It is a small 
matter for me to be judged by man's 
judgment. Yea I judge not my own 
self, but He that judgeth me is the 
Lord." Above he did not mean the 
wisdom of this world that comes to 
naught; but he did mean not the 
wisdom of this world but the wis- 
dom which none of the princes of 
this world knew, for if they had 
known by revelation that Jesus was 
the Christ, never would they have 
crucified the Lord of glory. 

I believe I understand and appre- 
ciate the great difference of the 



wisdom of this world and the re- 
vealed wisdom, but I can't write of 
it as I so much desire. The Bible 
abounds with both, and both are 
useful to a degree, but the revealed 
knowledge, or wisdom, is so much 
greater that if one had the former 
he would have to become a fool to 
learn the other. 

The first time I had the pleasure 
of entertaining the wise Sylvester 
Hassell in my humble home, it ap- 
peared to me that I just must speak 
to him of how ignorant I felt in the 
presence of him, who was so learn- 
ed as we all know him to be. He 
said to me, "If any man thinketh he 
knoweth anything, he knoweth 
nothing yet as he ought to know." 
Moses was learned in all the wisdom 
of the Egyptians; but by faith he 
esteemed the reproaches of Christ 
greater, and forsook all for he had 
respect for the recompense of re- 
ward. Solomon was a wise man, 
but he desired of God wisdom that 
he could rule over such a people as 
Israel, and preferred it to all the 
honour and riches which could be 
bestowed upon him. 

Herod no doubt was wise so far 
as this world was concerned; but 
shepherds keeping their flock by 
night, seem wiser than he. 

To be brief I must refer the read- 
er to Psalm 119, and to some extent 
we can see here that God, as per- 
taining to wisdom, is all tn all. And 
now to conclude — for we must do 
this — though the subject be so 
scripturally vast, by one more quo- 
tation to be found in Exodus 36:25 
verse, "And all the women that 
were wise hearted did spin with 
their hands, and brought that which 
was spun both of blue, and of pur- 
ple, and of scarlet, and of fine linen. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



25 



and all the women whose hearts 
stirred them up in wisdom spun 
gnats hair." O the depth, both of 
the wisdom and knowledge of God. 
How unsearchable are His judg- 
ments and His ways past finding 
out. 

J. T. SATTERWHITE. 



LOVES THE PRIMITIVE 
BAPTISTS. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear Sir: 

Inclosed you will find a post of- 
fice money order for two dollars to 
pay for the Landmark from May 15, 
1930 to 1931. I hope you will 
pardon me for not sending it any 
sooner. I have been receiving it 
for over a year. It has been such a 
comfort to me that I look forward 
to its coming. 

I wish to say how greatly I did 
enjoy the writing of sister Annie 
Hooks on "How We Learn Obed- 
ience." I am a member of the F. W. 
B. and have been since 1909. There 
is no comfort for me. I do love the 
Primitive Baptists and their doc- 
trine. I have learned that I am a 
poor helpless sinner, so low that all 
is my prayer. Lord have mercy on 
poor me. 

If I am saved it will be by the 
grace of God. 

Mrs. Clem Gray, 
LaGrange, N. C. 
Route 1, Box 135. 



INCOMPLETE WITHOUT 
LANDMARK. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co. 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Si/s: 

Inclosed you will find a check for 
two dollars ($2.00) for which 
please renew by subscription for 



the Landmark another year. 

I feel that my household would 
be incomplete without my Land- 
mark. It cheers me when I am 
downcast. In the winter when the 
days look dark and dreary and 
when I begin to look on the dark 
side of everything the Landmark 
helps me to solve the question by 
picturing everything on the plan of 
salvation. I am willing to sacrifice 
much to have the Landmark in my 
home because God's glory is mag- 
nified by His works and by His love 
to man. 

I sincerely hope I will not miss a 
single copy the rest of my life. 
Very sincerely, 
Mrs. Edwin Winfon, 
Fremont, N. C. 



BEEN TAKING LANDMARK 
OVER 50 YEARS. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear Sir: 

Inclosed you will find one dollar 
to pay on my subscription to Zion's 
. Landmark. I am almost 74 years 
old and have been taking the Land- 
mark for over 50 years. Ten years 
ago my husband died and I have 
been getting the Landmark since 
for one dollar a year. I feel that I 
cannot do without it for it is indeed 
a great comfort to me and has been 
for many years. I enjoyed reading 
the dear pieces your father wrote 
for the Landmark and the memory 
of them will always be precious to 
me. 

My subscription has been out 
since the first of this month. I 
should have sent the money in soon- 
er but I was sick and neglected it. 
Yours truly, 
Mrs. D. S. QUINN, 
Newport, N. C. 



26 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



A GOOD LETTER. 

Dear Brother Jones: 

Maybe you are receiving several 
good letters telling about the sweet 
meetings round about us, still I had 
a few thoughts I wanted to write 
you. 

We, Mr. Williams, and Sister 
Lewellyn Nathington, and myself, 
attended meeting at Hillsdale 
church yesterday. Bro. Trent was 
the only preacher present. The 
others were attending the White 
Oak Association, but there seemed 
to be preaching enough. It was 
sweet to me. Bro. Trent read some 
verses from the 10th chapter of 
Acts of Apostles and surely was 
blesesd to preach. As pretty as the 
singing was, the sermon surpassed 
that. It was food to the soul. The 
measure seemed to be filled up and 
running over. A lady joined by ex- 
perience. She is to be baptized 
next Sunday. I did not learn her 
name. She lives at White Oak, I 
think. 

This world (pretty as it is) we 
know will pass away, but the Lord's 
kingdom is everlasting. If I have 
that sweet abiding faith, that I 
sometimes lay claim to, when I go 
to that long sleep it will be glorious 
for there will be no sorrow there. 

We are our same little band here 
at church, all lovely and sweet to 
me like when you were able to at- 
tend. 

Would love to know how you are 
getting along. Hope you can be 
present for the meeting before long. 

I am expecting mama to visit me 
soon. She is attending the asso- 
ciations near her home this fall. 
Mr. Williamson and I send regards 
to you and Bro. Key's family. 



In sweet fellowship, 

Bertie Harris Williamson 
706 Walker Ave., 
Greensboro, N. C. 



READING LANDMARK FOR 
OVER 50 YEARS. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 

Inclosed you will find check for 
one dollar to pay for the Landmark 
up to February 15, 1931, if I am not 
mistaken. If I am living then I 
will send you another check. I 
have been taking the Landmark for 
over fifty years. I am now nearing 
my eighty -fifth year and feel that I 
can't be here much longer. I en- 
joy reading the Landmark as much 
now as I ever did. 

Since losing my dear companion 
the Landmark has been my only 
companion. 

I wish you much success. I re- 
main your friend, though I have 
never seen you. I have often been 
comforted by the preaching of your 
dear father. 

F. L. Brumfield, 



LIKED ELDER GILBERT'S 
EDITORIAL 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

I would like to say that Eld. M. 
L. Gilbert's editorial in the last 
Landmark was so good and sweet 
to me that I read and reread it many 
times and each time I read it, it 
grew sweeter. 

Do any of us feel that we are 
any better than Judas? I know I 
am not, only as I am sustained by 
God Almighty. This is written in 
love to the household of faith. 

I hope I am your true friend, 
Bettie Z. Whitley, 
Washington, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



27 



Zion^s Landmark 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Elder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 
Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. No. 2 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C, DEC. 1, 1930 



SAVED BY GRACE. 

Salvation through the free and 
unmerited Grace of God, through 
Christ Jesus, our Lord, is so fully 
taught in the scriptures, that it 
makes us wonder that any one 
should question the truth of it; or 
that one could contend for any 
other means, or way, unto life im- 
mortal, and to a spiritual knowl- 
edge of salvation, save by, and 
through Christ, the one and only 
name given under Heaven whereby 
one can or must be saved. 

Jesus had power given Him of 
the Father, to lay His life down, as 
the only sinless life the world has 
ever known, as an atonement for 
the sins of His people, and 
power to take His life again, or to 
arise, victoriously over death, hell 
and the grave, not for himself, 
alone; but for all the redeemed of 



the Lord, from every land, nation, 
kindred, tongue and people, an 
innumerable host. 

Jesus had power to save from 
temporal dangers as well as to save 
from sin, from death, and from the 
grave. 

He saved Peter when he began to 
sink, after having walked on the 
waters. Saved Daniel from the 
fierce den of lions, so that they 
could do him no harm. Saved the 
Hebrew children who were cast in- 
to the fiery furnace, and many, 
many other recorded instances of 
His being a very present help in the 
time of need; bids us believe that 
He saves to the uttermost all that 
call upon His name, in sincerity, 
and that while we often feel to be 
alone, still He the Good Shepherd, 
spake the truth of God when he 
said "I know my sheep, I call them 
by name, they hear my voice, they 
do follow me, My Father which 
gave them me is greater than all, 
and none is able to pluck them out 
of my hand." We believe this truth 
with all our hearts; but feel to say 
with one of old "I believe. Lord 
help thou my unbelief," for at times 
we fear we may be mistaken in 
what we have at other times felt 
to be a living faith in the reality of 
our being encompassed in His Love, 
and of our having truly known 
Him, in Spirit and in Truth, as our 
personal Saviour. 

In the first Book of Kings, we 
read, "As for God, His way is per- 
fect; the Word of the Lord is tried; 
He is a buckler to all them that 
trust Him. For who is God, save 
the Lord; and who is a rock save 
our God? 2nd Sam. 22:31-32. 

We are prone to forget these as- 
surances; forget the source from 



28 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



whence cometh all our blessings, 
and righteousness. And, too; we 
forget that afflictions, though they 
may seem severe, are oft in mercy 
sent. 

There is no salvation, in time or 
eternity, outside of Christ, the head 
of all things to the Church of God. 

"Salvation will God appoint for 
Walls and for Bulwarks." Isa. 26:1. 

"Salvation through our dying Lord, 

Is finished and complete. 
He paid whate'er his people owed. 

And cancelled all their debt." 

God the Father, the Son and Holy 
Ghost, the Trinity, are as one, in 
agreement, and will conform the 
church of God to a oneness. 

He (Christ) came to seek and to 
save the lost, to save from sin, and 
the power of sin to forever con- 
demn. He became the end of the 
law, or put an end to the power of 
the law to forever condemn, by ful- 
filling the law, in the shedding of 
His own sinless blood; and imputes 
his righteousness unto his people, 
therefore; "All their righteousness 
is of me saith the Lord." 

The goodliness of the flesh, as the 
flower of the field, will perish; but 
the i-ighteousness of the Lord en- 
dureth forever. 

"Let no man say when tempted 
he is tempted of God: for God can- 
not be tempted with evil, neither 
tempteth He any man; but every 
man is tempted when he is drawn 
away of his lust, and enticed. When 
lust is conceived it bringeth forth 
sin ; and sin, when it is finished, 
bringeth forth death." — James 
1:13-15. 

All have sinned, and fallen short, 
therefore there can be no justifica- 



tion before the Lord save through 
the imputation of His righteousness. 
There is not an exception. 

"Wherefore, as by man (Adam) 
sin entered into the world (and 
death by sin) And so death passed 
upon all men, for that all have 
sinned: (For until the law came) 
sin was in the world;) but sin is not 
imputed when there is no law. For 
if by one man's offense death reign- 
ed by one; much more they which 
receive abundance of grace and of 
the gift of righteousness, shall reign 
in life by one— JESUS CHRIST. For 
as by one man's (Adam's) disobedi- 
ence many were made sinners, so 
by the obedience of one (Jesus 
Christ) many shall be made right- 
eous. Moreover the law entered that 
the offense might abound; but 
where sin abounded, GRACE did 
much more abound. Excerpts 
from Romans 5th Chapter. 

No one questions the fact that sin 
hath abounded to the extent that 
every nation, kindred, people, and 
tongue are afflicted with sin, the 
worst of all diseases, nor should fail 
to agree that there is but one rem- 
edy for sin. The sinless blood of 
Jesus being the only sinless sacri- 
fice that could meet the demands of 
the broken law of God, therefore 
He cried out, when His blood was 
shed for our sins, and said "It is fin- 
ished." The atonement was thus 
made, once for all His people, and 
once for all time. 

This grace, the free and unmerit- 
ed favor of God, not only redeemed 
His people from their fallen state 
back to their former state : but HIS 
GRACE MUCH MORE ABOUND- 
ED to their full SALVATION, and, 
it abounded, to their PRESERVA- 
TION, RESURRECTION, and 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



29 



FINAL and ETERNAL GLORIFI- 
CATION. 

To whom is this SALVATION 
given as a free and unmerited 
favor? It is given to all the redeem- 
ed of earth of every nation, kindred, 
tongue and people, and we believe, 
it fully embraces all His people sev- 
erally and individually, who have 
felt, now feel or will ever feel the 
need of the cleansing power of 
Jesus' blood, and imputed righteous- 
ness, and that, in the great beyond, 
all of the redeemed of the Lord will 
sing, in unison, the song of redemp- 
tion, saying THOU art worthy, 
THOU hast redeemed us to God, 
and made us reign as Kings and 
Princes forever and forever. 

O. J. DENNY, 



"THANKSGIVING DAY" 

The decree by our nation and 
state to give thanks to God and to 
worship at this particular time is 
rarely observed by any of the Primi- 
tive or Old School Baptist Churches. 
The tendency of the times is more 
and more toward uniting church 
and state, which our fathers in the 
Constitution wisely protested 
against. The ordinance of "Thanks- 
giving Day" was first promulgated 
by the New England colonists in 
1621. During the Revolutionary 
War the Continental Congress rec- 
ommended the same; and such a 
day was set apart by President 
Washington in 1789 and 1795. Then 
by President Madison in 1812; and 
by President Lincoln in 1864. Since 
then such has been proclaimed by 
exery president and by most all 
Governors of the states of our 
union. 

When the church fails to meet 
with the Catholic or Protestants re- 



ligious orders they are ready to ask, 
Are you opposed to giving thanks 
to God for His continued mercies 
and blessings? saying did not Paul 
inculcate, "giving thanks always 
for all things unto God"? Yea; but 
did not the man after God's own 
heart say: "I will bless the Lord at 
all times: His praise shall continual- 
ly be in my mouth." Ps. 34:1. What 
right has any human being, though 
he be clothed with the title of King, 
President, Governor, Bishop or 
Pope, to set apart one day in the 
year for the thanksgiving of the 
nation at one common shrine? What 
kind of a "god" is he anyway that 
all people should meet to serve and 
worship one day of the three-hun- 
dred and sixty-five in the year? 

Surely the saints of God do not 
think giving thanks to God every 
day for His mercies and blessings, 
both temporal and spiritual, are too 
many. The people of God should 
never have to ask leave, in any age 
or place, from "the powers that be" 
to worship their God, but may pray 
and exhort that heads of govern- 
ments may so rule that true believ- 
ers "may lead a quiet and peaceable 
life in all godliness and honesty." 
The church of God is not of this 
world, though in it; so her faith and 
practice must be of the Lord, for in 
matters of conscience to Him, she 
should look, and not to rulers of 
nations. Let the church say with 
Peter, whether it be right in the 
sight of God to hearken unto you 
more than unto God, judge ye." It 
is true all people are amenable to 
the laws and need the protection of 
the executors, but want no man to 
tell them when and how they shall 
worship God. Rulers have no more 
right to command our worship than 



30 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



they have to demand our sacrifice. 
When some state or national ruler 
makes such a proclamation for all 
the people to assemble on a certain 
day to worship in the thanksgiving 
service, it sounds like Pharaoh, who 
was the the first ruler that pro- 
claimed to national Israel, "Go ye, 
sacrifice to your God in the land." 

God has required a separation 
from the world of both national and 
spiritual Israel as an indispensable 
act to the true service and worship 
of Himself. The answer of Moses 
to Pharaoh's proclamation should 
be the answer of the church today 
to Heads of Government: "It is not 
meet so to do; for we shall sacri- 
fice the abomination of Egyptians 
to the Lord our God; so shall we 
sacrifice the abomination of the 
Egyptians before their eyes, and 
will they stone us? We will go 
three days' journey into the wilder- 
ness, and sacrifice to the Lord our 
God, as He shall command us." The 
church must be saparate from the 
world in her service, else the world 
will say, "I can see no difference 
between us; it is all alike, an edict 
by the same Chief." The desire of 
Pharaoh to get Israel to worship 
God in the land in accordance with 
his proclamation portends a more 
serious issue than a superficial ob- 
server might think. 

David said, "What time I am 
afraid, I will trust in God." The 
fanatic protestant says, "Be not 
afraid there can be no danger of a 
union of state and church from the 
President, or Governor's merely 
proclaiming that his subjects should 
worship and serve God at a certain 
time, for no such motive could be 
entertained as long as the addressed 
is permitted to assemble for service 



under his own vine and fig tree." 
The siren voice of no danger and no 
harm has been to the hurt and sor- 
row of the oppressed of Zion of our 
God at many times and places. May 
the true believers ever oppose such 
nation-wide worship, if they would 
bear loyal testimony for Christ, 
which they never can do joined with 
all religionists, as thus decreed. The 
safety of the church is to continue 
separate from the religious world ; 
for she can never expect the ap- 
proval of her God to rest upon her 
when she acts in matters of worship 
from the authority of men. To 
Caesar belong the things which are 
Caesar's, and unto God belong the 
things which are God's. Faith is a 
gift of God, and separation is an act 
of faith. 

Yours in the fear of God, 

M. L. GILBERT. 



ORDINATION. 

Lone Pilgrim Church of Largo, 

Florida, being persuaded of the 
Lord that Brother T. B. Crawford 
had been called of God, and believ- 
ing he was fitly qualified to be set 
apart for the full functions of a 
gospel minister, some sister church- 
es were requested to send certain 
elders for that purpose. 

Elders E. J. DeVane, Joe Hudson, 
T. J. Davis and M. L. Gilbert met 
with the church on Saturday and 
third Sunday in November, 1930. 
Organized by electing E. J. DeVane 
moderator and M. L. Gilbert, clerk. 
At the request of the moderator, 
Deacon J. J. O'Berry brought Bro. 
T. B. Crawford before the Presby- 
tery. Joe Hudson requested the 
brother to relate his call to the min- 
istry, which was satisfactory. Then 
the spokesman of the church, Dea- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



31 



con Martin McMullen, said he felt 
sure that the brother possessed 
those qualifications as required of a 
minister in the third chapter of 1st 
Timothy. The Elders knelt with 
hands placed upon the brother, and 
prayer was made by T. J. Davis. 
The charge was delivered by 
M. L. Gilbert. This service closed 
by singing, during which the Pres- 
bytery and church greeted with 
glad hands the young elder and his 
beloved wife. 

Elder E. J. DeVane, Mod. 

Elder M. L. Gilbert, Clerk 



Remarks. 

Unquestionable, Eld. T. B. Craw- 
ford is a man of God, and of very 
bright parts, whose gift has made 
room for him among Primitive Bap- 
tists wherever known. He is meek, 
humble, temperate in all things; of 
good report, possessing a character 
above reproach. 

No man should be ordained to 
such a high calling whose word 
cannot be relied on, who is immoral 
and filled with lusts and slanderous 
motives ; and if such sins should fol- 
low after ordination he should be 
disposed of by the church. 

M. L. GILBERT. 



W, p. WARREK 

In memory of brother W. P. Warren, 
who was more than seventy years of age 
when he died suddenly in the town of 
Mebane, N. C, on August 22nd, 1930. Bro- 
ther Warren joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Prospect Hill in Caswell County 
at the March meeting in 1903, and was 
baptised by Elder L. H. Hardy. Brother 
Warren was ordained a Deacon of the 
church at the May meeting in 1912. He 
was so faithful that we never had any 
doubts as to whether we would find him 
at church on his church days. He was 
very sincere in filling the office of Deacon. 

Brother Warren was greatly loved and 
will be missed by his church and also by 
many brethren in his and other Associa- 
tions. He provided well for his home and 
was fatihful in his neighborhood and was 



always ready to help any one in getting to 
their church, when he could be of any con- 
venience to them. 

We can say a faithful man is gone, but 
we trust to him a place is given to dwell 
among the saints in heaven. 

1st. Be it resolved that we bow in hum- 
ble submission to a perfect and all wise 
God who never makes any mistakes. 

2nd. That we send a copy of this notice 
to Zion's Landmark and also one to the 
Lone Pilgrim for publication, and also a 
copy to Sister Warren. 

Done by order of the church at Prospect 
Hill in Conference at September meeting, 
1930. 

ELD. B. F. McKINNEY, Mod. 
W. D. BLALOCK, Church Clerk. 



JDHN R. NELSON 

In memory of our dear father, John R. 
Nelson, whom the Lord called from the 
shores of time to eternity on the 28th day 
of August, 1930. He was born December 
18, 1844, making his stay on this earth, 
85 years, 8 months and 8 days. 

Papa enjoyed very good health and was 
always bright and cheerful as long as he 
lived. Even while confined to his bed he 
was still cheerful, never complaining or 
wanting anything. He seemed to take 
everything so well and bore his afflictions 
with the most patience I ever saw. He 
didn't seem to suffer any pain. A weak 
heart was his trouble and he just slowly 
weakened away until he finally fell asleep 
to await the resurrection morn. 

Papa was married November 24, 1870 
to Agnes Andrews who preceded him to 
the grave by seventeen years. She died 
March 14, 1913. To their union were 
born eleven children, seven boys and four 
girls. All are surviving with the excep- 
tion of one son, Walter, who died May 17, 
1916 at the age of 3 2. 

Papa joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Flat Swamp at the August meet- 
ing in the year of 18 74 and was baptized 
by Elder J. L. Ross. He remained a faith- 
ful member until the end. 

The last two months he lived, which was 
July and August, he wasn't able to attend 
church but he never forgot the time. I 
have never known him to miss a meeting 
but once before, then on account of illness. 
He was a faithful member for 56 years. 
His church was his greatest pleasure. He 
loved the church and loved the members 
who were so kind and faithful to him 
while he was sick. Every one seemed to 
love him for which I am glad. It makes 
me love them more. 

Papa volunteered and went to the war 
at the age of 18 years. During the second 
year of the war he was slightly wounded, 
but he served his time out. After the war 
he returned home and went to work. 
Later on he married and in a hard strug- 
gle managed to live on a small farm, 
worked hard and raised his family. 

He was always cheerful and in the worst 



32 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



of his coiitinenieiit he wore a smile. He 
knew tliat his time here was almost out 
and (li.'it li(> woulr! soon receive his last 
call, l)n( lie seemed reconciled and slad the 
end was near. He had pretty ili'eams and 
visions oT llic presence:^ ot' the Lord with 
him \vhi(di revived his hope so much that 
he was not afraid to die. This is a com- 
fort and a consolation to us all. Why 
want him to stay where storms and temp- 
tation beclouds the way? I feel satisfied 
with the good evidence he gave of a hope 
of heaven. 

Papa believed in the doctrine of Salva- 
tion by Grace, ever proclaiming that re- 
demption was the gift of God. He lived 
and died in the faith of the Lord Jesus 
Christ. He was a soldiei' of war and a 
Soldier of the Cross. I truly hope there 
is a crown of righteousness for him in 
heaven. Tlie Lord fivedi and the Lord 
taketh away. Hlessed be the name of the 
Lord. 

Funeral services were held in the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church in Roberson, the 29 
day of Au.^ust, by Elder J. N. Rogerson 
and B. S .Cowan. They both spoke very 
consolingly to the family. 

Therefore, be it resolved — 

1st. That we bow in humble submission 
to the will of our heavenly Father wh'o 
does all thin.us well, bein.i; too just to err. 

2nd. Thai a copy be sent to Zion's Land- 
mark, and a copy be written on our church 
books. 

Done by order of Conference, Friday be- 
fore Saturday and the first Sunday in Sep- 
tember, 1930. 

J. N. ROGERSON, Mod. 
E. C. HOUSE, Clerk. 



MHS. JERRY H. CARTER 

It Is with a sad heart that I will attempt 
to write a few lines in the way of express- 
ing my feelings in regards to the death of 
my dear companion who departed this life 
October the 18th., ig.SO. She was born 
August 3rd., 1893, making her stay here 
on earth, 3 7 years, 2 months and 15 days. 
She tmited with the Piimitive Baptist 
Church at Simpson's Creek, Horry County, 
S. C, Juna 12th., 1927, was baptized July 
10th., 19 27, and lived a faithful member 
till her death. 

She was a daughtei' of the late Elder 
(I. W. C,ori', who jireceded her to the grave 
on Ain'il :;i(l. ami was a vei-y good 

wife and ninth i-. alv.a\s going ahead to 
have e\-er,\ tlpiiu jir . iiared for the comfort 
of her faniih- and Irieiids that she could to 
make thorn liapiix. 

She left to mnm ii tlieir loss, her husband 
and three children, mi ■ son. Earl, 15, one 
daughter Mary Pearl, lH, and a small son, 
James Hill, 5 months. Her death was 
such a shock to us all after her short ill- 
ness of only six days, when death came in- 
stantly, she being conscious to the last 
minute. But we believe she is gone home 
to her blessed Jesus who can give her 
peace and happiness where there will be 



no more meeting or parting or trouble or 
sorrow, where I hope that I can be taken 
after I pass from this world of sorrow and 
sin. 

Effingham, S. C, R. 2. Jerry H. Carter, 



SARAH J. WILLIAMS 

The subject of this notice was the 
daughter of Stanley and Polina Stallings, 
and was born November the 17th., 1860, 
died October 2nd., 19 30, making her stay 
on earth 69 years, 11 months and 15 days. 
She was married twice, the first time to 
the late Elvin T. Lilley. To this union 
was born one daughter dying in infancy 
and two sons, Eber Lilley of Norfolk and 
Labon Lilley of Martin County, N. C. Her 
second marriage was to the late Samuel 
Williams of Beaufort County. Both hus- 
bands preceded her to the grave. She 
united with the Primitive Baptist Church 
at Smithwick's Creek about thirty seven 
years ago and has been a consistent mem- 
ber ever. since till death, always filling her 
seat at church when not providentially 
hindered and enjoyed singing hymns of 
praise. 

She had a paralytic stroke about 16 
months ago and has been almost helpless 
till death. She seemed to bear her afflic- 
tions with much patience. She was one 
of a family of sixteen, only four left to 
survive her, Mrs. S. D. Griffin, Mrs. Jos. 

A. Lilley, Mrs. Sylvester Peel and Mrs. D. 

B. Stallings, all living in Martin County, 
near where they were reared. The funeral 
was preached by Elder B. S. Cowin of 
Bear Grass to many of her friends and rel- 
atives at the home of her son Labon. In- 
terment was made in the Tice burial 
ground, near the home of Brother Wm. E. 
Tice. We hope and believe that our loss 
was her eternal gain. A. D. GRIFFIN, Sr. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

The following resolutions of respect in 
memory of Sister Huldah Staton were 
passed by the church at Great Swamp. Sis- 
ter Staton died suddenly on the 10th day 
of September 1930. We feel it our duty 
to manifest our love and appreciation for 
her faithfulness to the church. 

Therefore be it resolved: 

1st, That we bow in humble submission 
to the will of God who makes no mistakes. 
Although taken from the evils of this 
world we grieve not as for those that have 
no hope, but believe she has gone to a bet- 
ter world. 

2nd. That we extend our Christian 
sympathy to the bereaved family and hope 
they may be enabled by Jesus to put their 
whole trust in God who is the author and 
finisher of our faith. 

3rd. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to Zion's Landmark for publication. 

Done by order of the church at Great 
Swamp Saturday before the fourth Sunday 
in September, 1930. 

LENA HARRINGTON, Clerk. 
S. B. DENNY, Moderator. 



ZION'S LANDM \Ei<^ 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

- AT = 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIV. DECEMBER 15, 1930 No. 3 



MANTLE OF ELIJAH FALLS ON ELISHA. 

"And Elisha saw, and he cried, my father, my father, the chariot of 
Israel, and the horsemen thereof. And he saw him no more: And he 
took hold of his own clothes, and rent them in two pieces. 

He took up also the mantle of Elijah that fell from him, and went back, 
and stood by the bank of Jordan: 

And he took the mantle of Elijah that fell from him, and smote the 
waters, and said. Where is the Lord God of Elijah? And when he had also 
smitten the waters, they parted hither and thither; and Elisha went over. 

And when the sons of the prophets which were to view at Jericho, saw 
him, they said. The spirit of Elijah doth rest on Elisha. And they came 
to meet him, and bowed themselves to the ground before him. 

And they said unto him. Behold now, there be with thy servants 50 
strong men; let them go, we pray thee, to seek thy master: lest peradven- 
ture, the spirit of the Lord hath taken him, and cast him upon some 
mountain, or into some valley. And he said. Ye shall not send. 

And when they urged him, 'til he was ashamed, he said. Send. They 
sent therefore, fifty men; and they sought three days, but found him not. 

And when they came again unto him, (for he tarried at Jericho,) he 
said unto them, Did I not say unto you. Go not? 

And the men of the city said unto Elisha, Behold I pray thee, the sit- 
uation of this city is pleasant, as my Lord seeth: but the water is naught, 
and the ground barren. 

And he said. Bring me a new cruse, and put salt therein. And they 
brought it to him. 

And he went forth unto the spring of the waters, and cast the salt in 
there, and said, Thus saith the Lord, I have healed these waters; there 
shall not be from thence any more death or barren land. 

So the waters were healed unto this day according to the saying of 
Elisha which he spake. — 2 Kings 2:12-22. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. 0. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO.. 



Wilson, N. C. 



Bcvotc^ to the (tause of ^esus (ibnst 



LOVES THE PRIMITIVE 
BAPTISTS. 

To the household of faith, 
Greetings: 

For relief of mind I shall in my 
crude way try to write the reason of 
my love for the Primitive Baptists. 
As far back as memory permits me 
to recall, I respected this peculiar 
people. My parents were mem- 
bers and very attentive to church. 
Why they wanted to go on Saturday 
seemed strange to me. Then I be- 
came a bit worried with Sunday 
service. I held them in sacred 
nearness though and was so delight- 
ed when they visited our home, only 
was shy for the fact that if they 
talked with me any they would 
learn I was a vile sinner. I fully 
thought it would make my case 
worse if they, especially the preach- 
ers, knew many of the bad things I 
did. I especially feared Elders 
Gold and Isaac Jones. Would try 
so hard to wait on them when ever 
they visited us. I did not want to 
live a sinner all my life and truly 
thought I would some day live above 
sin. 

My first serious thoughts were 
after seeing a well beloved aunt of 
mine joined the church at Old Ban- 
ister, when she began to talk to the 
church she said, "I've nothing much 
to tell only my great love for them. 
I have searched the scripture and 
read there, 'We know we have 
passed from death unto life because 
we love the brethren'." 



This scene has gone with me 
many years and today it seems I can 
see that lovely sight. I was quite 
young and from this I seemed to de- 
sire baptism. Some years after this 
beside the main road leading to my 
parental home was made a beauti- 
ful pond which afforded water for 
a home and was always used by the 
Missionary Baptists for baptism. I 
often shed tears over this for I be- 
lieved the Primitive Baptists were 
right and I really wanted to be one. 
My father often talked on the sub- 
ject, and I desired above all things 
to please him. He seemed fond of 
me and often expressed a desire for 
me to wait on him when he was 
sick. My desire to be baptized in 
this particular place was a source of 
worry. It had never been used by 
Primitive Baptists. W-e children, 
(six of us) attended revivals at dif- 
ferent churches, most regularly at a 
church near home, as 'twas near 
enough that we walked. My old- 
est sister (Mrs. Lynsky) made a pro- 
fession during one of their meetings. 
This increased my meditations to 
the extent that it seemed I could not 
rest day nor night. I loved her de- 
votedly and had utmost confidence 
in her then and also now though 
she is not a member of any church. 
We are near the same age and were 
bosom friends all of our girlhood 
days. Neither wished to go unless 
the other did. Shortly after this 
she married and went a good dis- 
tance from home. This increased 



34 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



my worries and serious meditations. 
No real pleasure in life it seemed. 

I can't recall dates but near the 
year of 1900 there was an Associa- 
tion held at Old Banister and my 
trouble was so great, I resolved I'd 
not go, but some way was there on. 
Sunday and not a sermon did I hear 
until becoming tired I found myself 
enjoying a song, then a strange 
preacher arose and I decided I 
would listen to him. His text was 
from Ruth 1st Chapter, 21st verse. 
My feelings can't be described, but 
you dear saints who have felt the 
quickening power know what it 
meant to poor me. 

To my amazement a preacher was 
going home with us and 'twas Elder 
W. M. Monsees who had preached. 
I was miserable, so afraid he would 
discern my thought. I was both 
glad and sorry when he was gone. 
Some time passed and no relief. 
Oh! if some one would address me 
or speak a word of comfort. The 
next July three years from this 
time, the annual revival was held. 
Some way I was almost case harden- 
ed. No one cared, not even papa. I 
attended each night and the mem- 
bers also the minister seemed great- 
ly interested. I was pleased to 
some extent and took a seat each 
night among the choir, but the 
thought of displeasing papa was be- 
fore me constantly. On Friday 
night the preacher came to talk 
with me, and very soon among his 
remarks he said, "I am so sorry to 
see all of you cling so tenaciously to 
that doctrine taught you by your 
father." 

This remark went over me as a 
flash. I rudely replied, "My father 
has never tried to teach us religion 
as there is too much to his for him 



to think man can teach it to an- 
other." 

This spread over the community 
rapidly, caused lots of criticism and 
me lots of thought. Saturday fol- 
lowing I was stricken with acute ap 
pendicitis. In those days we had 
no automobile service, so by the 
time a doctor reached me I was al- 
most wild from pain and pro- 
nounced critically ill. Those friends 
who had seemed so interested in my 
soul's welfare came and stood by 
my bed during the night and next 
clay while the two physicians made 
plans for taking me to the hospital, 
which was done Sunday night. Dur- 
ing this time I can never tell what I 
suffered, doomed to die without 
friends on earth, and no hope of 
heaven, had insulted all who even 
lelt an interest in me, I yet believed 
human help was necessary. Oh! if 
only I could tell papa and ask him 
to pray for me. I could see him as 
he passed my window so many 
times. Methinks I can see that 
sv/ect troubled face now so anxious 
r.bcut me. I thought if he only 
knew I wanted him to pray for me, 
so after dark when all was ready 
and they were taking me from my 
bed to the one made ready on the 
wagon, he was near enough for me 
to speak to him. I grasped him by 
the hand and said, "Papa, pray for 
rne." He remarked "I've tried 
daughter. Can't you pray for your- 
self?" 

This remark it seemed brought 
about a realization that it was an 
individual matter; how my heart 
yearned to utter a word of prayer, 
leaving home in the night, facing 
^^eath, unable to pray, justly con- 
demned before God. Monday I 
was told my operation was set for 
Thursday. How I passed this time 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



35 



I am not able to tell, but I was en- 
i^bled to utter the sweetest prayer 
tiiat sinful lips can, "Lord save, I 
perish." I was perfectly willing 
lor the operation when the time 
came. Friday morning as the sun 
arose I was viewing the beautiful 
sight, so happy, filled with praise 
and thanksgiving, lying there, long- 
ing to see my oldest sister of whom 
I've spoken before, when my oldest 
brother stepped in the room and he 
told Floyd (my other brother) right 
after that Ella has a hope. He has 
never openly manifested one but I 
have felt hopeful of him, for I only 
talked of the mercy and goodness of 
God and how strange it was that 
one could fear death and after the 
danger was over they would not. I 
only craved to tell papa and my old- 
est sister for I thought they only 
would understand. After going 
home, I decided 'twas only imagi- 
nary. I'd not tell any one. I 
would get on pretty well, everyone 
was nice to me now. I was at this 
time engaged to a Missionary Bap- 
tist. He and many of the members 
were so very nice to me. I declined 
the idea of telling papa, but told my 
intended husband of such a desire to 
be baptized in this beautiful pond. 
He spoke nice and encouraged me 
to be baptized though the church 
was not mentioned. 

Sometime after this Elder Mon- 
'^ees visited cur home. I had often 
resolved that if papa, mama, or any 
Primitive Baptist ever spoke to me 
on the subject of religion 'twas all 
mere fancy and I would banish it 
from my mind. When this dear 
brother was ready to leave it fell 
ray lot to take him to the station. 
On our way he in speaking of visit- 
in?T our home referred to each one 
and why he admired them. Then 



said, "I admire you most for I be- 
lieve you have a hope." This put 
an indescribable feeling to my very 
heart. What could I say or think. 
What I had desired so long was now 
realized, I wept and rejoiced over 
this. Finally resolved if ever he 
was at Malmaison (my home 
church) and could baptize me, I'd 
at least offer to the church. Not 
long after this he spent the night at 
my father's. Oh! the awfulness of 
those hours, afraid to do what I 
desired above all things, yet how 
could I refuse. My resolve then was 
I'd never fear if arrangements were 
made for me to be baptized where I 
had always wanted to be and by 
him. I do not recall how, but to 
my utter amazement plans were 
made for us to go direct to the pond 
from the church and he baptized me 
that afternoon as he was leaving 
for his home right after the service. 

Beloved saints, I shall never be 
able to tell my feelings during that 
day. I did not think one who felt 
as I did could ever doubt again. 
The man to whom I was engaged 
was present at the church, but not 
the water, so I must then write and 
release him from the engagement if 
he so desired. He answered the 
letter personally and to my great 
surprise seemed to think I had done 
my duty. It's useless to say I was 
still happier. Time drifted on and 
he proved to reverence my belief. 
In August 1911 we were married. 

God saw fit to bless us with five 
children, two girls. We were as 
devoted as people could well be I 
suppose, yet were only permitted to 
be with each other 14 years. 

My inability to question divine 
providence causes me much trouble, 
just can't refrain from that rebel- 
lious nature, to wish him back that 



36 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



my life would not be so dreary and 
full of cares. To you who have 
not passed this trying ordeal you are 
blessed and little know the awful- 
ness of such grief. 

God in His Infinite mercy so 
blessed me I do desire above all 
things not to even ask why? He, 
the Great Jehovah God strengthen- 
ed me and caused me to realize the 
Lord is my shepherd I shall not 
want. All you who read this, re- 
member me and mine when you can. 
To fully realize that God is mind- 
ful of orphans and widows is such 
a sweet thought. The world at 
large is much against children being 
reared in the nurture and admoni- 
tion of the Lord, though I hope to 
know nothing is impossible with 
God. 

I thoroughly enjoyed Elder 
Rowe's experience. The children 
would ask each time the Landmark 
came if "Mr. Rowe's piece was in 
there." I thought of writing this 
then. Last fall being asked to tell 
my experience reminded me, you 
once said you would, so in Nov. I 
was somewhat indisposed and final- 
ly wrote a portion of this. I read 
and re-read it till I just could not 
understand why I had ever thought 
of it. 

Since then I have been so de- 
pressed, and blue much of the time 
groping in darkness, not even able 
to grasp a few crumbs, after spend- 
ing most of the nights wide awake, 
meditating, I promised if ever I 
heard one more sermon with under- 
standing I'd again think as did 
John, surely I'd been shown these 
things again and I was blessed to 
thoroughly enjoy Elder Herndon's 
sermon on last fourth Sunday at 
Cane Creek. 

Now dear editor, I wish to say if 



you see fit I would like to see this 
in print in the Landmark. Also 
that before your father passed to 
his reward, I hope I loved him for 
Christ's sake. I feel to say as did 
my dear aunt, it's comforting to 
realize that brotherly love, that she 
felt when she knew she had passed 
from death unto life because she 
loved the brethren. Hoping you a 
long useful life and that the Land- 
mark may continue. 

With love, 

Mrs. Ella Richardson, 
Keeling, Va. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

lUiss Virgie Newton, 

Nelson, Va., 
Dear Sister in Christ: 

I feel impressed somev/liat to 
write to you tonight. I do hope 
that you have improved very much 
since I saw you last. 

I appreciate your card very much 
but would have enjoyed a good let- 
ter like you once wrote. We want 
vou to remember that our Associa- 
.ion Starts next Friday. Do hope 
yju can come. Will meet you in 
Raleigh any day at any hour. The 
/amily and I are all well. 

As I was impressed to write you 
this scripture came to my mind, 
"Gcd said let there be light and 
there was light." Gen. 1 :3. I may 
try to give you some of my views in 
regard to this scripture. This was 
spoken by God, in the morning of 
creation. God had an everlasting 
use for this light, though it has been 
years untold since God spoke these 
v/crds, and as He spoke He was 
obeyed. He used no tools nor tim- 
ber to make this light, but because 
He ordered the light to shine it was 
obedient unto Him and this light 
has continued to shine from that 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



37 



covered the face of the deep. Now 
this is why God said, let there be 
light. When we are blessed to see 
the beauty in this Scripture, we see 
ourselves just an earthen vessel, 
void and full of darkness, can't see 
how to travel at all ,and we are 
powerless, can't move, can't speak. 
Like the earth at this time it had 
never produced any living sub- 
stance because of darkness, but the 
light must shine to bring forth heat 
and moisture that the things that 
God (different seeds) had placed in 
its body could germinate and come 
forth, each one after its own kind. 

Now the human family, being 
dead in sin, by transgression, are 
full of darkness and this darkness 
prevails until it pleases God to so 
direct that Scriptural light to shine 
in us and as this ever abounding 
light, Christ Jesus, shines in their 
moment until the present, and will 
continue to shine as long as time 
lasts. There was a purpose in God 
speaking these words because dark- 
ness prevailed upon every side. Now 
where darkness prevails you can't 
see, so it pleased God to separate 
darkness. Now let's notice that by 
the coming of light that darkness 
does yet prevail. Only where this 
light doesn't shine now; while this 
light (the sun) has continued to 
shine, darkness has continued to 
prevail also. But, where the light 
shines darkness flees away. And 
by the shining of this light we are 
permitted to see how to travel with 
more ease than we can when we are 
in darkness. Now these are facts 
that we can see and teach from 
natural observation. The world 
can see and understand these 
truths. But this is only proof that 
better things exist. We note that 
the earth was void and darkness 



poor, dark, benighted souls then 
that spirit of darkness which is sin 
has to vanish away, for the excel- 
lency of this wonderful light so 
overcomes the powers of darkness 
that it doesn't even exist; O, you 
will say that I just said that by the 
shining of this light that darkness 
has continued. Truly I did, and so 
it is with the poor sinner, remember 
that when God ordered this light to 
shine in your poor soul, that you 
were so full of love that at that mo- 
ment you were not aware that you 
were a sinner still but we soon come 
to ourselves and then, oh how de- 
ceitful I am. I just thought I was 
rejoicing in the presence of a light 
that would ever exist, but I find I 
am again in sin; but let's see, I don't 
seem to be burdened with sin. But 
yet I realize I am yet a sinner. You 
see you have come back to yourself. 
God has caused His light to revolve, 
it is still in you. Because Jesus is 
that light and it is He who is in you 
the hope of Glory and anchor of 
the soul, both sure and steadfast. 
Now in the revolving of this light, 
God sees himself and for the first 
time in all his life has he known 
what it meant to dwell in darkness 
and also the pleasure of walking in 
the light. The flesh is that which 
must fade away for it is full of sin, 
it can't ever exist because of the 
sentence of death for transgression, 
but this ever living light has power 
over this fading flesh, even in death 
and after this body of ours has de- 
cayed and in the dust; this same 
light that has made us to rejoice in 
time with this fleshly sinful body, 
will shine more triumphantly over 
our decayed dust and bring it back 
again, not as it once was, for when 
we first existed we possessed the 
frailty of Adam, which was of the 



38 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



earth, earthy, sinful and vile, but 
now that we have been quickened 
by the second Adam the Lord God 
from heaven, the Quickening Spirit 
and brought forth to shine forever 
wit?i Him in eternity, then we will 
have a body like His, because we 
will shine with the same light that 
Jesus shines with a continued light, 
for in Him is found no guile and 
there will be none in His heritage 
because they have left in the grave 
where they have been fully pre- 
pared to meet him face to face and 
be with Him in all time. But now 
while we are in this body of sin we 
have our doubts and fears, tempted 
upon every hand. But be of good 
cheer, my Father's little child. It 
has been the Father's good pleasure 
to overcome all the fears and snares 
of Satan and he has boldly exclaim- 
ed, I am He that was dead and I am 
alive forevermore, no more to die, 
no more to mourn, but to live for- 
ever, conqueror over death, hell and 
the grave and he says he has the 
keys of death and hell. Sometimes 
dear sister, I hope I have had a dis- 
tant view of this wonderful light 
and that I am permitted to trust 
that I am living in rays of its glory, 
then again I doubt if I have ever 
been blessed to see anything but 
darkness or not, sometimes I be- 
lieve I know that I know what the 
truth is and that I know the doc- 
trine of electing grace, and then 
again I am made to feel that I have 
never sung one song to His praise, I 
have never been able to speak one 
word to his praise, oh! miserable 
man that I am. Who shall deliver 
me from so great a death. Jesus, 
that spotless lamb of God who was 
obedient unto death for poor sin- 
ners, it is him that hath delivered 



and we trust He will yet deliver us 
from these cast away feelings. 

Sister Virgie please pardon me 
for taking the privilege of writing 
you as I have, and taking your time 
to read my scribble when you would 
be reading something better. I will 
tell you a dream I had once, and 
you will see why I write you as I do. 
I dreamed I had a large pile of bun- 
dles to give you. They were every 
one for you. Some were larger 
than others but everyone was wrap- 
ped up just alike and all tied with 
the same kind, of string and every 
one had the same kind of wrapping 
paper. I meditated very much 
over this dream and what it meant 
and it was revealed to me in this 
way that it was my letters that 
were the bundles and the wrapping 
and string represents one doctrine, 
one faith, one hope, and that is the 
Lord Jesus. Sister Virgie please 
pardon my mistakes and if my 
writing is any comfort to you, give 
God the praise and please pardon 
me for writing you for I can't help 
it, for I hope I love you for Christ's 
sake and I want you to just write 
the wife and me a long letter full 
of good news, that is just your 
thoughts as God blesses you to write 
and I am sure they will be comfort- 
ing to us. My wife joins me in love 
to you. Remember us to your af- 
flicted brother. Surely hope he is 
better by now. Give him our best 
regards and may God bless both of 
you with many more pleasant days. 

Your little brother in hope, 

E. C. JONES. 



ENJOYED HER VISIT. 

To my many relatives and friends 
whom I visited on my recent trip to 
North Carolina. 

I wish to say I had a marvelous 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



39 



time. I visited as far east as At- 
lantic, was at the church once, but 
did not have any service as the min- 
ister was ill. This was Elder L. H. 
Hardy's home church. I missed 
him very much. I have known and 
loved Elder Hardy all of my life. He 
baptized me thirty-six years ago. I 
spent quite a while in Beaufort, 
with a very dear friend of mine. 
While there I met one of my child- 
hood school teachers whom I had 
not seen since I was eleven years 
old. Needless to say we did not 
recognize each other at first sight. 
We had a very pleasant visit. I 
did not spend much time in More- 
head City. I think the bridge be- 
tween Beaufort and Morehead a 
great improvement to both towns. 
I spent some time in Wildwood 
where I wisited my only brother. 
He is an invalid. I found him quite 
cheerful and I believe trusting in 
our Lord for his salvation, both here 
and in eternity. I spent quite a 
while in Newport my old home 
town, where I have quite a number 
of friends and relatives. On the 
third Sunday in August at Newport 
Church, I had the pleasure of hear- 
ing Elder Hutchins preach. This I 
enjoyed very much. The fifth Sun- 
day in August I attended a union 
meeting, at a church called Mew- 
borns, I would say about ten miles 
west of Snow Hill. This was a 
great feast to me. I looked to see 
if there was any one I knew, and 
was very much pleased to see Elder 
John Gardner. At this church they 
had very good singing which I en- 
joyed, also good preaching, and 
served a lovely dinner out of doors. 
Everybody was invited to partake. 

First Sunday in September I was 
at Hadnot's Creek Church. Was 
very glad to meet Elder Brown, and 



many of my old friends. At this 
church I had the pleasure of com- 
munion, which was a very great 
privilege to me as I seldom have 
that pleasure these days. 

On the third Sunday and Satur- 
day before in September. I was at 
my home Church, Newport, for 
quarterly meeting. I was very glad 
to be there. Elder Brown and El- 
der Roberts were with us. I missed 
our dear pastor, Elder Isaac Jones. 
We all loved Brother Jones very 
much. Let us pray the Lord will 
send some one to take the care of 
our Church. 

In October I was Diessed to attend 
the White Oak Association held at 
Cypress Creek Church. This was a 
lovely meeting. Had quite a num- 
ber of ministers, and lots of good, 
sound preaching. I was blessed to 
enjoy it. Here I missed Elder 
Jones again very much. Saw Sister 
Jones at this meeting. She is a 
dear little woman. I love her very 
much. The next week I went to 
Wilson, where I attended the Black 
Creek Association. Here we had 
more good sound preaching and 
very good singing, met lots of my 
old friends here. Surely was glad 
to see Elder J. T. Rowe, whom I 
had not seen in years, yet I recog- 
nized him. Was glad to meet his 
wife and children. It was a great 
privilege to m.eet and hear Elder O. 
J. Denny. He reached the closing 
sermon and I thought it was timely 
and wonderful. I spent a few days 
in Rocky Mt. From there I went to 
Greensboro. Met Elder Gilbert on 
the train from Wilson to Selma. I 
V nt out to Church in Greensboro, 
xiiet a lovely little band of Baptists, 
they were very nice to me. Heard 
Elder King preach. I liked him very 
much. 



40 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



The western part of the "Good 
Old North State" was very beauti- 
ful in all the glory of autumn. On 
the fourth day of Nov. I said good- 
bye to my sister and left for my 
home and loved ones in Chicago, 111., 
where I was given a lovely welcome 
home by my children and little 
grandson. Will be glad to hear 
from any of my friends who choose 
to write to me. 

With love, 

Sincerely, 
Maye Nelson, 
4432 N. Central Park Ave. 
Chicago, 111. 



CLEANLINESS AND FILTHINESS. 

This, Monday morning, I find my 
mind running on the great and im- 
portant subect of "Cleanliness and 
Filthiness," and I do not propose to 
write upon it as I now see and feel 
about it. Only a hint to the wise 
may suffice. I think I fully under- 
stand the necessity of that cleans- 
ing which is brought about only by 
a divine miracle, like healing of the 
leper. One said, "Lord if thou wilt. 
Thou canst make me clean," and 
He said, "I will, be thou clean," and 
his leprosy departed. 

I say, I believe I fully understand, 
and highly appreciate the miracu- 
lous cleansing by the word of God, 
and God can command and it 
stands fast, or speak and it is done. 
But this is not what has kept roll- 
ing in my mind all this morning. I 
knew — 

"Tis Thine to cleanse the heart. 

And sanctify the soul. 
To pour fresh life in every part. 

And new create the whole." 



But I became concerned about 
the great subject of "cleanliness 
and filthiness" in the following 
manner. A certain man and his 
good wife were expected to come 
before the church for membership, 
and a lady who knew them well, 
said, "They are perhaps good folks, 
but they are the filthiest folks I ever 
saw, when it comes to their daily 
manner. "There is a generation 
clean in their own eyes, and have 
never been washed from their filthi- 
ness." — Prov. 

Such might make clean the out- 
side of the cup and platter, and ap- 
pear to our sight as whited sepul- 
chers, but to Him who seeth not as 
man seeth, they could then be as a 
cage of unclean birds, or full of 
dead men's bones. I feel it a duty 
upon me to speak here of "Clean- 
ness and filthiness," as was men- 
tioned by the honest lady above re- 
ferred to. We believe she knew 
what she was talking about when 
she said, "They are the filthiest 
folks I ever saw when it comes to 
their daily manner." There is no 
excuse for such filthiness. And we 
feel justifiable by Bible teaching to 
say, we doubt the Christianity of 
any one willingly filthy. 

In the days of Nehemiah, when 
the walls of Jerusalem were dilapi- 
dated, one thing is very noticeable, 
and that is he and all of his work- 
men put off their clothes for wash- 
ing only. Nehemiah 4:23. 

A full investigation justifies our 
position, that cleanness; (and not 
filthiness) is obligatory upon us in 
every way. Let us practice clean- 
ness for such is commendable 
throughout the written word of 
God. 

J. T. SATTERWHITE, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



41 



DEDICATES NEW CHURCH. 

Elder E. L. Cobb of Wilson and 
Elder J. B. Roberts of Greenville de- 
dicated the new Primitive Baptist 
church at Farmville which was do- 
nated by Mr. R. L. Davis of that 
place. 

This building of brick veneer 
takes the place of the old wooden 
structure which was also built a 
number of years ago by Mr. Davis, 
and this generous act is greatly ap- 
preciated by the membership far 
and wide. 

Elder Roberts has been pastor of 
the church since the death of Elder 
C. F. Denny, and is an able minister. 
Both Elders Cobb and Roberts re- 
ferred to the generous gift and 
thanked Mr. Davis in behalf of the 
congregation and both delivered ex- 
cellent sermons. 



ELECTION. 

While our preachers were so 
beautifully portraying the Gospel 
Kingdom, at our Association on 
Monday, my mind became fixed on 
election, so I will mention just a few 
thoughts. 

This election was held long ago, 
by our Lord Jesus and there was no 
opposition or counting of votes, for 
all His preachers were elected on 
one platform and all at one time, 
hence they preach the same thing 
today, thereby making this associa- 
tion one of love and fellowship. 

Not only the preachers of today, 
but those of past ages and those yet 
unborn, all elected at the same time. 
What a wonderful election and it 
seems that preachers were not all 
that were elected, as the whole 
church of God, were not always 
called sheep or lambs, so they were 
elected too, for these preachers 
were told to feed my sheep and that 



my sheep hear my voice and follow 
me. They didn't appear to have 
been sheep always, but their elec- 
tion is sure and every one serves his 
calling. They may get out of the 
way and suffer the perilous times 
that He say shall surely come, but 
this election being sure, the "hope" 
implanted in our souls, remains alive 
to the end. 

A complete record of this election 
is already made and their names 
written in the Lamb's Book of Life, 
even before any of us were born. 

How precious these thoughts to 
me. 

Written in love, 

H. L. BRAKE, 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 



A CORRECTION. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co., 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sir: 

Please correct a very important 
mistake in Nov. 15th issue, of Land- 
mark, in article of mine. 

In reference to London Confes- 
sion of Faith, Eld. S. H. Hassell's 
comments on page 6, line 20, the 
word "predecessors should be suc- 
cessors." 

D. V. SPANGLER. 



CORRECTION. 

LaFayette, Ala. 
Dec. 13, 1930. 

Dear Sir: 

In the last Landmark it makes me 
say "gnats hair" when it should 
read "Goats" hair — as in Exodus 
35 :25. See it and correct in the 
next number of Landmark. 

I am yours in hope, 

J. T. Satterwhite. 



42 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Zion's Landmark 



"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Lider O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
hlder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
holder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. No. 3 



Lntered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C, DEC. 15, 1930 



GREETINGS 

We extend Christmas Greetings 
to all our associates in the editorial 
work and publication of the Land- 
mark. 

We also wish for each of our cor- 
respondents and readers a pleasant 
Christmas Season, and a New Year 
filled with the blessings of the Lord. 

We know we are imperfect, and 
may not have used careful oversight 
over the matter that has been pub- 
lished, during the year; but we only 
ask, what we are willing to accord 
to others, comparative freedom of 
the pulpit and press, to the end that 
each of us may present our theme in 
our own way, with due regard for 
others, that they may also express 
themselves frankly. 

We have not felt that we were su- 
perior in wisdom or tact, and feel 
that we need the loving forbear- 
ance of our kindred in Christ. 



Some matters have come to us 
from time to time, which dealt with 
local troubles, which we have felt 
should not be published abroad. 
Local matters and personal differ- 
ences which concern a very limited 
number of our people should not be 
published in the Landmark or in 
any other paper. 

The past year has brought many, 
many thousands of our members 
and friends together in our Associa- 
tions and Union Meetings, The au- 
diences, as far as I have observed, 
have been unusually attentive, hos- 
pitable, and many of the hearers 
have been deeply moved. 

Many of those who are not num- 
bered with us as members are deep- 
ly concerned about the apparent 
differences among some of the min- 
isters, and the thought seems to be 
quite prevalent, that there is not 
that unity, and loving oversight and 
gentleness in evidence among our 
ministry that was in evidence dur- 
ing former years. 

May the Lord bring peace to Zion. 
"Let brotherly love continue." 

We have in North Carolina seven- 
teen associations, about three hun- 
dred churches, and many ministers 
of quiet, godly bearing. Our total 
membership (not taking time to see 
just how many of them are in cor- 
respondence with each other) is ap- 
proximately twelve thousand in this 
State ; but I am fully convinced 
from my rather wide acquaintance 
With Primitive Baptists and their 
followers, that: we may safely say 
that there are at least nine Primi- 
tive Baptists, at heart and in faith, 
not enrolled as members to each one 
enumerated as a member of our 
Churches. 

May the Lord so bless our church- 
es that they be as a City set upon a 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



43 



hill, and we would to God that 
peace and love might be abroad in 
the land. 

O. J. DENNY. 



EGYPTIANS SOLD THEIR LAND. 

And Joseph bought all the land 
of Egypt for Pharaoh : for the Egyp- 
tians sold every man his field, be- 
cause the famine prevailed over 
them. So the land became Pha- 
raoh's. Gen 47:20. The story of 
Joseph's going into Egypt and his 
career as Governor over the land is 
a very interesting one. The Lord 
had told Abraham about it long be- 
fore and Joseph said to his brethren, 
the Lord did send me before you to 
preserve life. But the immediate 
cause of his going was the jealousy 
of his brethren. Joseph had dream- 
ed a couple of dreams that indi- 
cated that he would some day rule 
over them, and they were deter- 
mined if possible to prevent it. And 
I suppose that when they sold him 
to those strangers who took him in- 
to Egypt they thought they had ac- 
complished their purpose, little 
thinking that this was the first step 
in bringing it about. While Joseph 
suffered great injustice and many 
hardships in Egypt, it was plainly 
manifest to those who came in con- 
tact with him that the Lord was 
with him and this is the secret of 
his wonderful success all the way 
through. He interpreted the 
dreams of two of the king's servants 
while in the prison and they turned 
out as he said they would, and Jos- 
eph said to the one who was taken 
back into the king's service, When 
it goes well with you remember me, 
and for two years things seemed to 
go well, and we have no account 
that in all that time he ever thought 
of Joseph. How like human na- 



ture unto this day, the better it goes 
with us in worldly things the less 
we seem to think of the poor and 
needy. But the Lord was going to 
bring a terrible famine on the land 
and he caused the king to dream a 
couple of dreams that troubled him, 
and none of his wise men were able 
to interpret them to him. Now 
when trouble came Joseph's fellow 
prisoner remembered him and spake 
to the king about him, and Joseph 
is brought before Pharaoh, and he 
tells the king that the two dreams 
Lre one. The seven fat kine and 
the seven good ears are seven years 
of great plenty throughout all the 
land of Egypt and that the seven 
lean kine and the seven blasted 
ears are seven years of famine that 
are to follow the years of plenty. 
And he advises the King that a man 
discreet and wise be sought out and 
placed over the affairs of Egypt to 
take care of the surplus, against the 
years of famine, and the king 
thought there was none so discreet 
and wise as Joseph and so he is 
placed at the head of the govern- 
ment of Egypt and without being 
further tedious, will say that Joseph 
brought about the greatest monop- 
oly that I ever read about in the af- 
fairs of men. When the people had 
spent all their money he took their 
cattle and herds and then themsel- 
ves and their land, and then the 
condition is brought about as stated 
in the text. And Joseph bought 
all the land of Egypt for Pharaoh. 
Notice he did not buy anything for 
himself, but all money, cattle, land 
and men were Pharaoh's. So that 
he is not only King of Egypt, but 
the owner also. In this wonderful 
salvation of the lives of the people 
in Egypt and the glory and wealth 
of the King, Joseph is a type of 



44 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Christ in the gospel kingdom. As 
the Lord was going to bring seven 
years of famine in Egypt, how good 
of him to send seven years of great 
plenty first, wherein he whom he 
naa sent into Egypt could prepare 
against the time of need. So the 
scriptures abundantly teach us that 
God the Father who foresaw the 
poverty he would bring upon his 
people because of sin, did gracious- 
ly and abundantly provide in Jesus, 
our Spiritual Joseph, for all the 
needs of those who have no grace 
and no means by which they can 
secure it, but they are supplied in 
their time of need for he has given 
them grace in Christ Jesus before 
the world began. And there is no 
scarcity since it pleased the Father 
that in him (Jesus) should all full- 
ness dwell. Joseph's brethren had 
greatly sinned against him yet he 
was kind to them and saved their 
lives, and the Lord's people are 
great sinners and put him to open 
shame. Yet he suffered and died 
for them, and rose again for their 
justification. In all Joseph's career 
in Egypt there is no account of any 
friction between him and the King, 
but Pharaoh sent the people to Jos- 
eph. So Jesus and his Father who 
are the King of all the earth, are 
one. The Father has committed all 
judgment to the Son, but he ever 
honors the Father, saying. My 
Father is greater than I, and I came 
not to do mine own will but the will 
of him that sent me. And he sub- 
dues all things unto the father, and 
in the end comes to his Father ask- 
ing to be glorified with his own self 
with the glory which He had with 
Him before the world was. As 
Pharaoh was king and owner of 
Egypt, so the Father, who is the 
creator of all things is the king and 



owner of Zion. "Thy maker is 
thine husband," and he is all in all 
to the citizens of his kingdom. 
Therefore the apostle says, glorify 
God in your bodies and in your spir- 
its, which are God's, all being his 
and he not willing that any should 
perish, but all should come to re- 
pentance. Jesus, speaking by the 
Prophet says, I the Lord both know 
my sheep and will seek them out 
from all the countries whitherso- 
ever I have driven them in the 
cloudy and dark day, and while in 
the flesh Jesus said, the Son of man 
is come to seek and to save that 
which was lost. The kingdom and 
its inhabitants are the Lord's. To 
him be praise now and forever. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



A GOOD WIFE. 

In reading the thirty-first chapter 
of Proverbs, especially from the 
10th to 31st verse, I thought per- 
haps there would not be one divorce 
to every fifty marriages if every 
man's wife was like the one therein 
described; whereas, statistics show 
nearly one-fourth of the people 
who marry in these United States 
are divorced; and two-thirds of the 
applications are filed by the wives. 
I read a statement some weeks ago 
that 80 divorces were granted in 
one of South Florida counties dur- 
ing the month of August. Such a 
condition is an alarming view of 
marital life, which is the most 
sacred natural institution of this 
world. It is the only divine insti- 
tution to propagate the race of 
mankind. For this cause God 
joined man and woman in the Gar- 
den of Eden as one flesh which 
meant they should not be separated 
only by death, or its equivalent, for- 
nication. The Pharisees who es- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



45 



teemed the laws of Moses above 
God's law, when they told Jesus 
that Moses allowed them to put 
away their wives for other causes. 
"He saith unto them, Moses, be- 
cause of the hardness of your 
hearts, suffered you to put away 
your wives: but from the beginning 
it was not so. And I say unto you, 
whosoever shall put away his wife, 
except it be for fornication, and 
shall marry another, committeth 
adultery: and whoso marrieth her 
which is put away doth • commit 
adultery." 

The language of Christ is clear 
enough for any pure mind, who 
loves virtue, righteousness and God. 
And, as denominational records 
show that twice as many women 
profess Christianity as men, which 
may indicate that they are more 
vile than women. Then, when the 
opinion of the great and spiritual 
minded of this age, that at least 
two-thirds of those who are profes- 
sors of religion have not the love 
and grace of God in their hearts. 
Thus in the course of things and 
events God's word will ever prove 
true, "evil men and seducers shall 
wax worse and worse, deceiving, 
and being deceived." How is the 
world growing better? 

Now this marvelous description 
of the ideal wife may not have ex- 
isted and may never be discovered 
among the wives of men ; for the 
price of such a companion would ex- 
ceed any other earthly treasure. 
Toward such an ideal wife, may I 
SDeak in comparative sense, of one 
with whom I have lived for nearly 
a half century. To live with one so 
long would be to learn her worth, 
virtue and graces. I have often 
felt that she was fitly qualified for 
a preacher's wife, and have as often 



felt that her husband was lacking 
in many things one should possess 
to be a companion of such a wife 
and a servant of such a Lord. This 
woman has four sons and four 
daughters, whose love and devotion, 
together with their father for her, 
make them believe there are none 
that exceed her as mother and wife. 

Evidently, times have changed in 
many ways since the days of Lem- 
uel, or King Solomon. Principles 
never change. An ideal wife then 
as now was not an idler — never was 
and never will be. No woman who 
fools away her time reading dime 
novels, dispensing scandal, strutting 
the streets, fluttering around card 
tables, constantly going to moving- 
picture shows, sleeping late in the 
morning, has ever made a good 
wife for any man. It may not be 
necessary for every wife to make a 
garment or cook a meal, but she 
should know how to do them, and 
to see that they are promptly done. 
The extravagence of this age does 
not consist so much in fast liv- 
ing as in foolish spending, and 
wasteful buying. As women do 
four-fifths of the domestic buying 
their wisdom or folly are manifest 
to a great extent as to prosperity or 
adversity of the home. The good 
wife knows how to capitalize her 
disadvantages. She as the queen 
of tidiness and industry is a bene- 
diction to the home, while sloven- 
ness and laziness in a wife would be 
the bane thereof. 

Now some one may be ready to 
say it is all according to tempera- 
ment whether the wife has, in a 
measure, the redeeming qualities of 
the ideal wife. She may not be 
able to help how she was born, but 
she can improve her natural inclina- 
tions and how she lives, The ideal 



46 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



woman is not born, she is made. Af- 
ter all Lemuel testifies that the 
ideal woman was one that feared 
the Lord, which shows she was 
"born again," a blessing of the 
Lord that no woman is able to at- 
tain of herself. But should she be 
blessed of God with the dual nature 
she has much advantage in every 
way to become nearly like the ideal 
woman than the good woman who 
has not the fear of God. Let me 
run without referring to the ideal 
man, if such there be. 

M. L. GILBERT. 



FOLLOWS HER MOTHER TO THE 
SPIRIT LAND. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

I herewith hand you a letter that was 
written by our friend and brother E. A 
Stanfield's daughter soon after her mo- 
ther's death during the first part of this 
year 193 0. Her name was Finettie Stan- 
field, a very promising young woman just 
arrived at the age of about 21 years, and 
she was taken sick suddenly a few weeks 
ago and died on the 24th of November of 
which I was called to officiate at her fun- 
eral, which was a very sad affair. 

Brother Stanfield did not know of this 
letter until after her death. He found it 
in some of her papers, and as it is so good 
and very striking for a young lady to have 
such a mind it is his wish that you have it 
printed in the Landmark, for the dear read- 
ers to read, for there are many that were 
acquainted with "Finettie" and know of 
her good qualities, and will be glad to see 
this in print. May our dear Lord bless 
our dear brother in his sadness at the loss 
of his wife and daughter, and be with him 
and hold him up in that blessed faith that 
was once delivered to the saints. 

In hope, 
E. L. COBB. 



Saturday P. M. 
March 8, 1930 

Mama, darling: 

Somehow, it seems to me, you'll see 
what I'm writng — can't you? There are 
so many things I want to tell you — won't 
you listen to me? 

When you left me, darling, I hadn't a 
chance to say "good-bye" — I didn't know 
when I left you last Sunday night, that I 
would go home the next day, and find my 
precious mother sleeping. I wouldn't call 
you back, if I could, dear — sleep on — 
peacefully and happily. God in His own 



good time v/ill reconcile me to our separ- 
ation. It won't be long, dear; so help me 
to live a pure. Christian life, that I may 
meet you "over there." Then, I may tell 
you the thousand little things I fain would 
tell you, now. No one understands me as 
>ou did; no one can realize my every 
thought and act, as you always did. No 
one understands how I miss and long for 
you! It's so very hard to keep on, without 
you! Still, your prayers will always follow 
me, and keep my footsteps in the right. I 
guess God knew that my love for you was 
too near idolatry. I made a shrine at 
your feet, and offered my whole life up to 
you. You repreesnted all in Life that was 
good and pure. No wonder I loved and 
woT'shipped you so! 

I try not to cry, mama darling — but 
tears will come. When my heart gets so 
full I can bear no more. When I think of 
never hearing you laugh again, never 
hearing you say one little word to me, I 
wonder how I can ever keep on without 
all those little things from you that make 
life worth living. Daddy has always been 
my pal, but you have been my guide, my 
stay and my comfort. You were mother 
and sister to me. Now, to whom shall 
I go when the little things of life assume 
an enormous place in my heart? Who will 
understand and sympathize with me as you 
always did? No one can, darling — I am 
alone — oh, so alone! Every night, I'll tell 
you my little worries and happinesses — 
for — tho' I'll not have an answer from 
you — I will know that you heard and un- 
derstood! 

There's a vacant chair, at home, tonight — 
The one our mother occupied — 
She made our home, a home of light 
And love and hope, and faith and pride. 

Her chair is vacant — oh how true! 
Yet she is with us; will always be, 
Her love will live, all through 
The ages of sweet eternity. 

She is sleeping, sweetly sleeping 
Her earthly cares are now at rest. 
Although her family and friends are weep- 
ing — 

They know she's in that "Land of The 
Blest." 

Dear mother — your dear hands are still — 
Those hands that made a house, our home. 
Your cares are o'er — and we must wait 
until. 

Our Saviour gently bids us "Come!" 

Life is hard to face, without you here — 

It's so hard to face reality, 

We miss you so, Mother dear. 

That nothing seems to be right, or real. 

May God help us to understand these 
lines — 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



47 



"Gorl moves in a mysterious way, His 

wonders to perform — " 
May we realize tlie truth of the poet's 

rhymes, 

And meet you, dear mother, 'round our 
Saviour's throne." 

Your devoted daughter. 



SKNl) A COPY OF EVERY MINUTE TO 
ELDER O. J. DENNY, 
WINSTON-SALEM. 

Information regarding the number of 
Ai-sociations, members, names of ministers 
of the Primitive Baptist Church in this 
state are desired from time to time for the 
purpose of furnishing data regarding the 
church to those who desire it, and for that 
reason we are requesting the clerks to send 
to Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, a 
copy of each minute of the different Asso- 
ciations as they are published each year 
in North Carolina, that he may be able to 
gather this information, and furnish it to 
those who request it. 



PENNIE DAVENPORT 

. Mrs. Pennie Davenport was born No- 
vember 1, 1868, died October 5, 1930, 
making her stay on earth 72 years. 

Sister Davenport joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church at Concord at the age of 
13. Here she remained in full fellowship 
for 59 years. Her greatest desires were 
to be always present, and she was when 
she was able to attend her church. 

Sister Davenport will be missed very 
much in her home, church and commun- 
ity. When anybody was sick, she was al- 
ways ready to lend a helping hand, doing 
whatever she could. The weather was 
never too cold or hot for her to go. She 
went through heat and cold. Truly it 
can be said, "She has done what she 
could." 

On Saturday before she died Sunday, 
she had a chill, but she revived and got 
up going around doing her work. Later 
in the evening (about 11:00 o'clock), she 
had a stroke and was never conscious any 

Funeral services were held at her home 
by Rev. T. F. Davenport, ably assisted by 
C. E. Barnes and R. C. Ambrose. Inter- 
ment was made in the family burying 
ground at home, beneath a beautiful 
mound of flowers. 

She leaves to mourn their loss a hus- 
band, three children, two boys and one 
sir!; eleven grandchildren and three great 
•■I'aiirtchildren. 

Keep pressing onward loved ones, al- 
ways walking in the paths of righteous- 
ness, following in mother's footsteps and 
when the time shall come when we have 
to cross over the dark river of death, we 
can see mother on the other shore, waiting 
to welcome her loved ones home. 

Now the world seems bleak and dreary, 
Sad our lives and weak and weary. 



Dispossessed of friends and guide. 
Oh, our lot a void seems only 
And our home is lonely, lonelyj 
Since our dear old niolher died. 

Not until the loom is silent, 
And the shuttles cease to fly, 
Shall God unroll the canvas, 
^^nd explain the reason why. 
The dark threads are as needful. 
In the skillful weaver's hand, 
As the threads of gold and silver, 
In the pattern he has planned. 

Written bv a sister, 

MRS. BETTIE FURLOUGH, 



HARRIET CAROLINE TRASK. 

By request of the oldest daughter I will 
attempt to write a few lines in memory of 
Sister Harriet Caroline Trask, who depart- 
ed this life April 8th, 1930. 

Sister Trask had been in poor health for 
several years but had not boen confined to 
her bed but about three weeks before her 
death. She was born in Duplin County, 
November 5th, 18 48, making her stay on 
earth eighty-one years, five months and 
three days. 

She was married to D. W. Trask Janu- 
ary 5th, 1868. To this union were born six 
children, two boys and four girls. Two 
died while young and the others still liv- 
ing are Mrs. J. W. Scott, Currio. N. C, Mrs. 
D. D. Cameron, Wilmington, N. C. Mr. G. 
W. Trask, Wilmington, N. C, and B. B. 
Trask of Florida. 

Sister Trask united with the Primitive 
Baptist Church abount forty years ago, 
and was baptized by Elder P. D. Gold, and 
lived a faithful and consistent member to 
the end. She was always a very indus- 
trious woman, toiling willingly for her 
household. Well might it be said of her 
"She looks well to the ways of her house- 
hold and eateth not the bread of idleness." 

All was done for her that kind hearts 
and loving hands could do, but none could 
stay the icy hand of death. 

The funeral services were conducted at 
the residence of her daughter Mrs. D. D. 
Cameron by Elder S. B. Denny, of Wilson, 
and the body was laid tenderly to rest in 
Oakdale Cemetery beside her husband who 
preceded her to the grave several yjars 
ago. The beautiful floral designs attested 
the love we all held for her. 

Besides her children she is survived by 
nineteen grandchildren, ten great grand- 
children, and a host of other relatives and 
friends. 

How we miss you no tongue can tell, 

But since we believe you've gone to 
dwell. 

In a land that knows no toils or strife, 
We hope some day to join you in that 
life. 

Written by one that loved her, 

Mrs, Hannah Rawls, 

Wilmington, N. C, 



48 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas it has pleased our Heavenly 
Father to call from our midst our Brother, 
Elder J. J. Hall, who departed this life on 
July 24th, 1930. Brother Hall was one of 
our able Ministers. He possessed a won- 
derful gift in preaching and also very plain 
and faithful in admonishing his church in 
discipline, and a man in whom we all felt 
safe when we were guided by his wonder- 
ful counsel. 

Therefore be it resolved. 

First, that in the loss of Elder Hall the 
Lower Country Line Union has sustained 
a great loss. 

Second, that we hope to bow in humble 
submission to the will of our Heavenly 
Father who doeth all things well, being 
too just to err and too good to be unkind. 
May we be able to say not my will but 
Thine be done. 

Third, that these resolutions be record- 
ed on our Union record and a copy sent to 
Zion's Landmark for publication, and a 
copy sent to the family. 

Done by the conference at Rosses church, 
November 29th, 1930. 

A. P. CLAYTON, 
J. M. O'BRIANT 
F. D. LONG, Committee. 



VANDON M. MILES 

Our beloved friend departed this life on 
the 13th day of June 1930. Mr. Miles 
never united with the church but was a 
man of sterling qualities, was noted for 
his integrity and loyalty to his friends. 
For many years he had a precious hope in 
The Lord Jesus Christ and was a firm be- 
liever in the doctrine of salvation alone by 
the grace of God. His chief joy was to 
meet with God's people, to hear the gospel 
of the Son of God proclaimed, and to join 
in the singing of the songs of Zion. His 
favorite hymn was "Amazing Grace," the 
words of this dear old song being given to 
him in his deliverance from the burden of 
sin. Several years ago he became deeply 
impressed that we should have a house 
and organized church. Mr. White of this 
town kindly donated the lot, and Mr. 
Miles was untiring in his efforts, giving 
freely his time, means and influence, un- 
til this was accomplished, saying that the 
little he had done was a labor of love and 
all that he asked in return was the privi- 
lege of a seat where he might hear the gos- 
pel preached, which place he filled when- 
ever an opportunity was afforded. We 
shall miss him, but we believe our loss is 
his gain, that he has entered into that rest 
that remaineth to the people of God. 



Therefore be it resolved. 

That we the members of Mebane church 
in conference assembled, as a loving trib- 
ute to the memory of our departed friend 
send a copy of this Memoir to Zion's Land- 
mark and place a copy upon our church 
record. 

Eld. T. F. Adams, Mod. 
W. F. Clayton, Clerk. 



ELDER D. Y. STAPLES WILL PREACH. 

First Sunday in January, 1931, Sandy 
Grove. 

Monday, Healthy Plains. 

Tuesday, Scott's. 

Wednesday, Lower Black Creek. 

Wednesday night, Wilson. 

Thursday, White Oak. 

Friday, Farmville. 

Saturday, Greenville. 

Sunday, Jan. 11th, Flat Swamp. 

Monday, Robersonville. 

Tuesday, Spring Green. 

Wednesday, Jamesville. 

Thursday, Briery Swamp. 

Friday, Smithy Creek. 

Saturday, Concord. 

Sunday, Bethlehem. 

Monday, Pongo. 

Tuesday, North Creek. 

Wednesday, Beulah. 

Thursday, Conoho. 

Friday, Coneto. 

Saturday, Flatty Creek. 

Sunday, Norfolk. 

Monday, Deep Creek. 

Tuesday, Lawrence. 

Wednesday, Tarboro. 

Thursday, Falls Tar River. 

Friday, Mill Branch. 

Saturday, Sappony. 

I will need conveyance. 



"MEMORIES OF LONG AGO." 

Or the Eariy Life, Experience, and Call 
to the Ministry of Eld. R. H. Pittman in 
which are interwoven many Scripture 
Lessons, emphasizing points of doctrine, 
practical questions and church matters 
that are of interest to all seekers after 
truth. In writing this book the author es- 
pecially desired to encourage the young, 
comfort the old, and to lead every reader 
closer in thought and service to the Per- 
fect One. If you buy this book and are 
not satisfied, you may return it and your 
money will be refunded. Prices — Leather- 
oid binding, 1 copy 75c; 3 copies $1.85; 
6 copies $2.4 0. In handsome silk board 
binding, 1 copy $1.00; 3 copies $2.40. Or- 
der from R. H. Pittman, Luray, Virginia. 
It. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

^^^^^^^^^^ AT ^^^^^^^^^^ 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIV. JANUARY 1 /^^l NO. 4 

JEHORAM'S CAMPAIGN AGAINST MEShA./,,,, 

Now Jehoram the son of Ahab, began to reign over Israel in Samaria, 
the 18th year of Jehoshaphat King of Judah, and reigned twelve years. 

And he wrought evil in the sight of the Lord; but not like his father, 
and like his mother: for he put away the image of Baal, that his father 
had made. 

Nevertheless he cleaved unto the sins of Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, 
which made Israel to sin; he departed not therefrom. And Mesha king 
of Moab, was a sheep master and rendered unto the king of Israel an 
hundred thousand lambs and a hundred thousand rams, with the wool. 

But it came to pass, when Ahab was dead, that the king of Moab re- 
belled against the king of Israel. 

And king Jehoram went out of Samaria, the same time, and numbered 
all Israel. 

And he went and sent to Jehoshaphat, the king of Judah, saying. The 
king of Moab hath rebelled against me: wilt thou go with me against 
Moab to battle? And he said, I will go up: I am as thou art, my people, 
as thy people, and my horses as thy horses. 

And he said, Which way shall we go up? And he answered. The way 
through the wilderness of Edom. 

So the king of Israel went, and the king of Judahm, and the king of 
Edom: and they fetched a compass of seven days journey: and there was 
no water for the host, and for the cattle that followed them. 

And the king of Israel said, Alas! that the Lord hath called these three 
kings together, to deliver them into the hands of Moab! — 2 Kings, 3:1-10. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIAie EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. 0. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



©epoteC) to the (Lame of ^esus Cbnst 



THE SAVIOUR OF MEN. 

To a garden of old 

Came the Saviour of men, 

In sorrow and sadness bowed down, 

To speak unto His God. 

On His knees on that night, 
He fought the great fight. 
For sinners and aliens from God. 
The pain was so great. 
It made the earth quake. 
While He suffered and winepress 
trod. 

We hear Him at last, 
Saying, "Father let it pass 
The draught of this bitter cup. 
If not, dearest one, 
Oh strengthen thy Son, 
That He may with content drink it 
up." 

It is over at last 

The dark hour has passed, 

His passion, His blood and His 

groans. 

His soul crucified, 
For poor sinners He died 
To redeem them from all sorrow 
and shame. 

The depth of that love, 
Which came from above 
Was made manifest on Calvary's 
tree; 

When the dear Lamb of God 
Spilt His own precious blood. 
For His bride — His own to set free. 



From death He arose 
Conqueror over all foes 
For the bride that to Him was given 
From sin justified. 
Freed and sanctified 
And will be gloriiied with Him in 
heaven. 

Fear not, weary one. 

For your Saviour hath gone, 

To heaven, a place to prepare. 

And will come again. 

On the clouds with sin, 

His ransomed to paradise bear. 

Where they will be freed 

From earth and its greed 

Forever with Jesus to dwell, 

And with hearts all ablaze 

Attuned to His praise. 

Their voices in anthems will swell. 

May we be prepared (the composer 
is) 

By the true blessed God 
To reach this sweet home of the 
blest. 

Where ought can disturb 
In heaven's blest abode. 
Be with Jesus, our friend, safe at 
rest. 

Where no storms can arise 
To darken our skies 
While over the field of glory we 
roam. 

With Jesus our friend, 
An eternity we'll spend 
With our kindred, our loved ones at 
Home. 



50 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



How grand the sentiment and 
how true. Surely this deep divine 
revelation is from God. It was 
iiled and composed by my dearly 
beloved pastor, Elder W. B. Clifton, 
and what a gift he has. He is heav- 
enly inspired. A solid, sound, or- 
thodox servant of the Most High 
and he is making full proof of his 
ministry by preaching the gospel 
in all of its purity. He feels that 
he has no time for compromise, but 
he hews to the line regardless of 
the applause of man. I glory in 
him for the stand he has taken, 
preaching his convictions, feeling 
he has no friends to lose or foes to 
gain. He is bold and fearless; a 
watchman indeed, standing on the 
falls of Zion, firmly rooted and 
grounded in the doctrine of salva- 
tion and grace alone. He preaches 
with power and much assurance, 
knowing full well that God has 
.called him to this great work. I 
try to speak words of encourage- 
ment to him, bid him God speed, 
for he is worthy. I highly esteem 
him, honor him, reverence him, for 
the work's sake. From one that 
loves him for the truth and Christ's 
sake. I am, I hope, his sister in 
Christ. 

Effie H. Carrawan, 
Swan Quarter, N. C. 



A GLOWING TRIBUTE TO 
PRIMITIVE BAPTISTS. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sir: 

Spending much of my time 
around a printing office, I frequent- 
ly come into possession of reading 
matter, that others not so favorably 
situated, do not. In looking through 
the exchanges, I find the Christian 
Index, a Missionary Baptist periodi- 



cal, published in Atlanta, Ga. I 
find the enclosed clipping in that 
magazine, and it is so interesting to 
me, and in the main, is such a glow- 
ing tribute to the Primitive Baptsts, 
that I am sending it to you, for your 
inspection, and reproduction, if you 
see fit. Of course there are the 
usual criticisms, and inaccuracies, 
that are always thrown at our 
folks: but excusing that it is, I think 
a great tribute to the old Church. 
The wonder with me is how a man, 
like the writer: being reared by a 
ovoted and loyal father and mo- 
ther of the old church, and seeing 
iiKiny good things practiced by 
those old people, in following the 
Lcachings of the scripture, can so 
far depart from his former teach- 
ings as to tie up completely with 
the world and the works of man, to 
the dishonoring of the King of 
P^^ace. But such are the conditions 
l;>day everywhere, which fills our 
hearts with sorrow. 

If you feel inclined to reproduce 
this piece, I will appreciate it, but if 
II :Gn>istent with your plans leave 
it off, and it will be all right with 
me. 

I am enjoying reading the Land- 
mark, and trust it may continue to 
be published, as it now is being 
done for many years to come, in or- 
der to comfort the saints. 

With best wishes, 
J. F. McGinty. 



Recollections of the Primitive 
Baptists. 

By J. B. Cranfill, Dallas, Texas. 

When we lived at Hallmark's 
f'r. irie. Bastrop County, Texas, the 
leading church of the community 
was that of the Primitive Baptists, 
who held their services in a small 
rawhide, frame structure, down on 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



51 



the south side of the prairie. Even 
at that the membership was not 
large, but inasmuch as my father 
and mother were members of that 
church, it was the one I attended in 
my childhood. 

The Primitive Baptists do not be- 
lieve in Sunday schools, missions, 
paid preachers or secret societies of 
any kind. 

One of my cousins, Dr. A. G. 
Cranfill, was first a Primitive Bap- 
tist, then joined the Missionary 
Baptist and became a Mason, and 
later returned to the church of his 
first love and took his demit from 
the Masonic Lodge. 

When he was down in Dallas at- 
tending a Primitive Baptist Associa- 
tion shortly before he died, he came 
to see me and I joked him about 
his change from the Missionaries to 
the Primitives, alleging that he did 
it to keep down the high cost of re- 
ligion. 

My father was a country doctor 
and a Primitive Baptist preacher 
and often I went with him to the 
various meetings of his denomina- 
tion. On one occasion I went with 
him down to Smithville, where the 
association met that year and the 
introductory sermon was preached 
by Elder Smiley. He was tall, 
homely, angular and uneducated, as 
were most of their ministers, but 
was, withal, a very impressive per- 
sonality. 

The Primitive Baptists are iron- 
clad predestinarians and some of 
them carry this doctrine to the point 
of believing in the eternal and abso- 
lute predestination of all things, A 
story emerges from my boyhood 
concerning a Primitive Baptist 
preacher out in the Indian country 
who, on Sunday morning preparing 
for his ride across the prairie to his 



preaching appointment, began to 
rub up his rifle and reload it. His 
son who had joined the Missionary 
Bpatists (most of the descendents 
of these dear Primitive Baptist peo- 
ple join the Missionary Baptists) 
said : 

"Father, I thought you believed 
in the eternal and absolute predes- 
tination of all things. If you do, 
why are you carrying your rifle 
with you today?" To which the 
dear old preacher, with a twinkle 
in his eye, replied : 

"My son, I have the feeling that 
God has foreordained that a Com- 
anche Indian will die today!" 

There are some outstanding quali- 
ties of these Primitive Baptists that 
identify them as a distinct and sep- 
arate people. One of these quali- 
ties is that of personal integrity. No 
Primitive Baptist is ever asked for 
security for any debt. They are 
honest, debt-paying, reverent, law- 
abiding citizens. 

While they have no organized 
missionary operations, and no salar- 
ies for their pastors, these good 
people do quite a little quiet char- 
ity. Often I hear them refer to 
that Scripture which says that we 
are not to let our left hand know 
what our right hand does. The 
main reason why these dear friends 
never let their left hand know what 
their right hand did was that the 
right hand didn't do anything, but 
now and again some generous- 
hearted member of the Primitive 
Baptists would give the pastor a 
new suit of clothes or a fresh horse 
or a new pair of saddlebags or other 
needed gifts, and now and again 
the whole neighborhood would turn 
out to help some unfortunate bro- 
ther gather his corn or cotton crop, 
and thus set him on his feet. 



52 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



There was another thing peculiar 
to the Primitive Baptists, and that 
was that, no matter how many 
preachers were present on any giv- 
en Sunday, they all preached. Upon 
a time in my boyhood four of the 
beloved brethren preached. Ser- 
vices began at 11 A. M. and lasted 
until 3 :3 P. M. My father was one 
of this group and closed the servi- 
ces. An hour's sermon for these 
blessed preachers was one of their 
brief messages. The average that 
day was an hour each, but my 
father — bless his soul ! — took up on- 
ly thirty minutes of that time. When 
church was dismissed I was the hun- 
griest Hallmark's Prairie lad that 
ever uncomplainingly took that 
much sermonic punishment. 

The climax of the sacred Chris- 
tion activities of these dear old-time 
friends of mine was reached when 
they had feet-washing. This came 
four times a year. Their thought 
was that to celebrate the Lord's 
Supper and follow with the feet- 
washing every month was to make 
it all too common in the public mind, 
but that to engage in these hallow- 
ed services every three months was 
to maintain their sanctity and dig- 
nity and, at the same time, follow 
the New Testatment command. 

If the reader has read the thir- 
teenth chapter of John's Gospel he 
has found there the basis for this 
practice of the Primitive Baptists. 
It is plainly written there and I re- 
fer the reader to that scripture les- 
son for confirmation of what I set 
down here, quoting only the open- 
ing verses, as follows: 

"And supper being ended, the 
devil now put it into the heart of 
Judas Iscariot, Simon's son, to be- 
tray Him, Jesus knowing that the 
Father had given all things into His 



hands and that He was come from 
God and went to God, He riseth 
from supper and laid aside His gar- 
ments and took a towel and girded 
Himself. After that He poureth 
water into a basin, and began to 
wash the disciples' feet, and to wipe 
them with the towel wherewith He 
was girded." 

In faithful similitude these dear 
people maintained, and yet main- 
tain, this very impressive ceremony. 
Well do I recall the gleeful antici- 
pation of the outsiders concerning 
this service. The wild-eyed cow- 
boys and loquacious critics would 
gather in the little meeting house to 
look on, and, when opportunity of- 
fered, poke fun at these plain folk 
as they entered upon what to them 
was one of the most sacred ordi- 
nances of God's house. 

Yes, I saw them when they came 
and many a time as a little lad, sit- 
ting in the corner of the church, I 
watched the critics, but in every 
case those who came to scoff re- 
mained to pray. Their lips which, 
when the service began, were curl- 
p'd in scorn, soon relaxed, and by 
Ihe time the feet-washing ceremony 
found its end many of their eyes 
were moist v/ith tears and the hu- 
mility of brotherly love exhibited by 
these devoted Christians were so 
impressive that all hearts beat in 
unison with theirs. 

Many and many a time old fron- 
tier feuds found their solution and 
their end upon these feet-washing 
occasions. Men who had been 
alienated could not with moist eyes 
kneel at each other's feet and fail 
to yield all thought of vengeance 
and submerge it in this glowing 
repetition of that deed the Master 
of men performed on the night He 
was betrayed. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



53 { 



And now as I conclude this story 
my heart overleaps the intervening 
years, and I find myself seated 
again in the old Hallmark's Prairie 
meetinghouse on the last Sunday I 
was ever to linger there. All of 
our cattle had been gathered, road- 
branded and bunched together for 
the drive up the Chisholm trail. For 
this one last time I, the wild, un- 
saved cowboy, occupied a seat on 
the rude bench as Abe Baker 
preached. One of the quaint cus- 
toms among the Primitive Baptists 
was that anon the preacher would 
leave the pulpit and quietly move 
up and down the aisles, shaking 
hands with the members of the au- 
dience and leaving a personal mes- 
sage with every one. Slowly, Abe 
Baker, knowing that next day we 
were to go out upon the trail, 
moved toward his youthful friend 
of the long years. Finally making 
bis way to where I sat, he held out 
his big, brawny, right hand to me, 
and with his left hand resting on 
my head, he said, calling me by my 
familiar boyhood name: 

Britton, you are leaving us tomor- 
row and I shall perhaps never see 
you again. Remember your Crea- 
tor!" 

With that, he turned his noble 
face away, but when I looked up 
and my moist eyes said goodbye his 
own were wet with tears. 

I never saw him more, but the 
words he said as that day he laid 
his loving hand upon the cowboy's 
head thrill in my grateful spirit as 
these words are penned. 



REMEMBERS ELDER GOLD. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co. 
Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Mr. Gold : 

I well remember your sainted 



fater, the late Elder P. D. Gold. He 
preached at my home church, Long 
Branch, a good many years ago and 
your mother. Sister Gold, together 
with two of your sisters, I have for- 
gotten their names, all took dinner 
with me and Sister Hash, and I 
helped convey them across the 
Blue Ridge mountains to the home 
of Elder Asa D. Shortt, in Floyd 
County. From there they went to 
the New River Association. Elder 
Isaac Webb was then Moderator of 
this Association. After his demise, 
Elder P. G. Lester became his wor- 
thy successor as moderator of the 
New River Association and remain- 
ed as moderator until his death last 
January. I had known Elder Les- 
ter for about 3 years, and to know 
him was to love him, as a man, and 
an able minister of the New Testa- 
ment. We miss his wise counsel 
and able writings. The Lord alone 
can raise up another to fill the va- 
cancy caused by his demise. 

O ! for grace to bear every bur- 
den and trust the Lord for every 
purpose of our salvation. 

It would be a real comfort if all 
the religious papers would only 
print such things as are in harmony 
with the experience of the saints 
and the scriptures as well. The de- 
parture from the scriptures, disci- 
pline, and the old Landmarks which 
the fathers have set, and the intro- 
duction of men made phrases bor- 
dering on the doctrine of the Scribes 
and Pharisees on the one hand and 
such expressions as would make 
God the author of sin on the other 
hand is what causes such trouble 
among our people. 

I feel like Elders O. J. Denny, M. 
L. Gilbert and J. T. Rowe are able, 
safe and sound men, who preach 
and write in harmony with the 



54 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



scriptures, believing in admonition, 
exhortation, obedience, and good 
works after a Godly sort and the 
predestinated purpose of God in the 
salvation of poor sinners as sure, 
certain, fixed and arranged in the 
mind and purpose of God before the 
world began. 

One great trouble is some certain 
preachers are not content to abide 
in their own calling but try to 
preach their own views and object 
to others preaching unless they just 
follow in their line of preaching. 
We read there is a diversity of gifts 
but all of the same spirit. Then why 
not let each abide in his own call- 
ing, preaching the preaching God 
bids him and not depart to fight the 
other fellow. 

May it please the Holy One of 
Israel to restore unto us the joys of 
Salvation, that we be found at the 
feet of each other earnestly con- 
tending for salvation by grace and 
grace alone. 

Enclosed please find $2.00 check 
for 2 years. 

Your friend and well wisher, 
J. G. L. Hash, 
Endicott, Va. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

My same precious Sister Higgins 
and family : 

Your card to hand yesterday. 
Glad indeed to hear from you, and 
that you can go around as you do. 
The dear Lord's power is not limit- 
ed like ours. He is ever near his 
little ones that trust him, and I be- 
lieve that is why He is sparing a 
few of the poor and feeble. They 
are kept here for a purpose or pat- 
tern of good works and faith in the 
good Lord. They are serving by 
the mercy and power of God, and 



we believe you are one of that num- 
ber. 

I regret I couldn't be with you at 
the White Oak Association. So 
glad you had a good meeting, and 
all in love and peace. Grandpa is 
up around the house but feeble. He 
was 84 the first day of this month. 
I fixed him a dinner and invited 
several people, but the weather was 
so cold and the ground covered with 
ice and snow, that only 9 got here. 
We spent the day very pleasantly. 
Do wish you could have been with 
us. Elder J. D. Vass and wife were 
among the guests present. We had 
real winter time last week. It was 
below zero one day. I hope I am 
thankful in the right way that I 
have everything in common, plenty 
of fuel, etc. We keep comfortable 
and how glad we all ought to be 
that all is as well with us as it is. 
We can't measure the goodness and 
mercy of the dear Lord to us poor 
sinners. Can we, Sister Higgins? 
I do wish you could come and stay 
a long time with us. I feel like we 
could talk better face to face, or at 
least I could. I would like so much 
to meet those dear people at Green- 
ville again. The last time I was 
there, Mr. Lundy and I stayed with 
a Sister House. She and her maiden 
sister stayed alone. I think her 
husband was dead, and she may be 
gone ere this. There are so many 
It South West and White Oak I 
would like to see again in this life. 
But many have gone on to the great 
beyond, as our dear ones have. How 
are Sister Collins and Gladys? I of- 
ten think of them, and Bro. and Sis- 
ter Pollard. How are they? I 
can't mention them all, but I will 
hold everyone in fond remembrance 
and too I am looking forward to 
[retting a photo of yourself. Tell 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



55 



Susie she might put her head in too. 
1 haven't seen her since she was 
married. I think her girl's picture 
is fine, and it gets my compliments. 

Remember us in prayer and that 
the dear Lord keep us humble, and 
at His feet is the desire of my poor 
heart. God bless you all. 

Hester Lundy and Grandpa, too, 
Galax, Va. 



THE GOODNESS OF GOD 

To the dearly beloved of the Lord: 
It is through and by the goodness 
of an all wise and all powerful God 
that we still embrace the stage of 
action and are permitted at times 
to enjoy many of the blessings, 
both temporal and spiritual, which 
He in His infinite wisdom and good- 
ness has perpared for our benefit 
and comfort while we live here in 
the world. We should appreciate 
these blessings so graciously bestow- 
ed upon us for our special benefit 
and try to serve Him who doeth all 
things well. He rains on the just 
and the unjust, furnishes seed to the 
sower and bread to the eater. He 
has mercy on whom He will have 
mercy and whom He will He hard- 
eneth and none dare to say, "Je- 
hovah, why or how doest thou?" 
He is at liberty and has the right to 
do all things according to His own 
will regardless of what men or 
devils may think, say or do. The 
God head dwelt bodily in Him and 
all power in Heaven and Earth was 
given into His hands, yet He said, 
"I come not to do mine own will, 
but to do the will of my Father, 
which sent he and His will is of all 
of them He gave me, I should lose 
nothing, but raise them up the last 
day." He said, "I will save My 
heart's delight," and it is impossible 
for Him to lie. He said, "I have 



loved thee with an everlasting love, 
therefore, with my loving kindness 
I will draw thee to my banqueting 
house where my banner over you is 
love." Have we not often been to 
Church and heard the preacher 
preach the gospel which is the pow- 
er of God unto Salvation to every 
one that believes and while he was 
preaching the gospel the sweet- 
ness of it filled our poor souls with 
his love and to overflowing in praise 
to God and the Lamb. And oh, 
how we loved our dear brethren, 
sisters and friends in the Lord. All 
to the glory of God and the Lamb. 
Yours in hope, 

J. R. JONES, 

Rockford, N. C. 
R. 1, Box 74. 



GOD CONVEYS HIS MESSAGE 
THROUGH LANGUAGE 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear Sir: 

I have been requested to send 
some views I have to you to publish 
in the Landmark if you see fit. God 
has provided a natural channel 
through which He conveys His doc- 
trine or spiritual nature. It being 
the English language which bears 
His image, the scriptures teach that 
the body without the spirit is dead. 
God has provided Himself a dead 
body that He might manifest His 
invisible life by giving it life as 
shown in that of the principals of 
the English language. Life visible 
consists of two opposites working 
together. The alphabet consists of 
26 letters; 5 vowels representing 
the five senses or the life of the 
English language. There are 19 
consonants representing the dead 
body. When they are divided they 
cannot form a word; the consonants 
l)ecause they are dead, the vowels 



56 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



because they need an opposite 
wherein they can manifest their 
life. God was manifest in the flesh; 
the life of the church is in Christ 
the head. The body only has the 
feeling sense, yet gets the benefit 
of the others. Now as to w and y — 
when I first became exercised this 
w and y was not opened up to me 
and seemed to hinder the harmony 
of my views, but when I was given 
to see it, it was the riches of all. 
Christ says "I am the way." W and 
y possess the nature of both conso- 
nants and vowels which bear the 
image of Jesus being both God and 
man. When a comes from the 
head of the list down to w and y 
it spells way, the consonants not 
adding on iota to it, so when God 
who is Alpha, Omega, the life, the 
all, comes down in the person of 
Jesus, He constitutes the way 
whereby poor dead sinners are 
saved. Adam's dead family has 
not contributed one iota to that of 
salvation. Jesus tread the wrath 
of the winepress alone and of the 
people there was none. Salvation is 
of the Lord. When salvation was 
accomplished Jesus was forsaken of 
His mother, His brethren and father 
and was seemingly in the hands of 
His enemies. When the applica- 
tion is made to the heirs of promise, 
they are and feel the same thing 
and one in the hands of their ene- 
mies which are their sins. I feebly 
hint at the fulness. 

A. L. Holloway, 

Durham, N. C. 



SENDING HER THE LANDMARK. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

Will write you a few lines asking 
you to excuse me for not writing 
sooner, but have had sickness in my 
family and neglected it, thinking I 



would be able to renew my sub- 
scription but cannot, the times are 
so hard and it grieves me to think 
of it. The Landmark has been 
coming to my house 38 years, but 
the Lord knows best. I am old and 
a poor widow, and my husband was 
a preacher and we always enjoyed 
reading it so much. But you will 
have to stop it. The Lord knows 
what I need and He will do the best 
thing for me. 

With best wishes, 

Mrs. M. A. Stokes, 
Greenville, N. C. 



Remarks 

We are sending the paper with- 
out charge from the fund created 
for that purpose, and by the way, 
there are only a few dollars remain- 
ing left in it. Remember we match 
every dollar sent by others with 
one from the Company. We want 
every person unable to pay for the 
Landmark who desires it to have it. 
In this way we are donating $1.00 
while others are also donating a dol- 
lar on each subscription. We wish 
we could stand all of the cost, but 
we are unable to do so. 

J. D. GOLD. 



ENJOYS READING LANDMARK. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co., 
Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sir: 

Inclosed you will find a money 
order for ($2.00) two dollars for 
the Zion's Landmark, from March, 
1930 until March 1931. 

I enjoy reading the Landmark 
and I have been reading it for a 
long time, and I don't feel like I 
can do without it. 

Yours truly, 

Nero Edwards, 
Nashville, N. C, Route 2. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



57 



Zion's Landmark 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
Elder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 

FU. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV 


No. 4 


Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 


as second class 


matter 


WILSON, N. C, 


JAN 1, 1931 



SAVED AND GLORIFIED. 

Salvation, a derivative word from 
the word SAVE, implies that there 
is a lost people, sinners saved. Lost 
by reason of sin. Saved by grace. 

Salvation, therefore, embraces 
the remission of sins by and through 
the righteousness of the Lord Jesus 
Christ, through His sacrificial 
death, life and intercession for His 
people, His name being the only 
name given under heaven whereby 
man can or must be saved. 

Out of Christ there is no salva- 
tion for sin, no security in time or 
eternity. 

In Christ. "I in you, you in me, 
I in the Father, and the Father in 
me." All the redeemed of the Lord 
are one in Him and one with Him in 
the Father, therefore their salva- 
tion is assured and secure. 

Salvation embraces a God given 
faith in God, and in Christ, and all 



true obedience, repentance, and all 
the graces of the Church of God 
being fruits of the Spirit of God, 
makes the way of salvation an high- 
way of holiness over the which no 
ship with its galley of oars, no 
"•avenous beast or sin-defiled thing 
passeth over it; but the redeemed of 
the Lord shall walk therein and 
shall return to ZION, with songs of 
everlasting joy and praise. 

Isaiah said in regard to the secur- 
ity of the saved of the Lord. "No 
weapon that is formed against thee 
shall prosper, and every tongue that 
shall rise against thee in judgment 
thou shalt condemn. This is the 
heritage of the saints, and their 
righteousness is of me saith the 
Lord." The righteousness of the 
saints is only the imputed righteous- 
ness of Christ, therefore they can 
sing in unison the song of redemp- 
tion, saying "Not unto us, not unto 
us; but to Thy name be all the 
glory." 

When left to commune with the 
flesh and the power of darkness, we 
grope in darkness, and in this condi- 
tion we are cast down, yet not de- 
stroyed, "For He that hath deliver- 
ed doth still deliver, and His power, 
wisdom, love and mercy cannot fail. 

Jesus is spoken of as the RE- 
DEEMER the HOLY ONE OF 
ISRAEL. One who redeems the 
lost can truly say "I came not to 
save the righteous; but to call sin- 
ners to repentance." 

Conviction for sin causes a Godly 
sorrow and "Godly sorrow worketh 
repentance unto salvation." 2d Cor. 
7:10. 

"If we glory at all we must glory 
in the Lord." God glorifies the peo- 
ple of God, adorning them with the 
gifts, callings and graces of the 



58 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Holy Spirit, and in the end bringeth 
them to a full and gracious posses- 
sion of eternal life and its glory and 
blessedness in the world to come. 

We read, "Marvel not at this; for 
the hour is coming in the which all 
that are in their graves shall hear 
His voice and shall come forth." St. 
John 5:28. 

Jesus said "I am the resurrection 
and the life, he that believeth on 
me, though he die, yet shall he 
live." 

The spirit of God has never been 
in bondage to sin. It is sinners that 
were bound, and set free by the sal- 
vation wrought by the Lord. 

Job said. "For I know that my Re- 
deemer liveth, and that He shall 
stand at the latter day upon the 
earth ; And though after my skin 
worms destroy this body, yet in my 
flesh shall I see God, whom I shall 
see for myself, and mine eyes shall 
behold, (HIM) and not another." 

With the abundance of scriptural 
teachings concerning the salvation 
of the whole redeemed family of 
God, we are justified in our belief, 
we think, that "SALVATION 
through our dying Lord, was finish- 
ed and complete. That He paid all 
His people owed, and cancelled all 
their debt." 

Therefore we conclude by saying 
the SALVATION of the LORD em- 
braces and encompasses the convic- 
tion, conversion, travail, deliver- 
ance, preservation, resurrection, as- 
cension, presentation and final and 
eternal glorification of the whole 
redeemed family of God of every 
nation, kindred, tongue and people. 
In hope, 
O. J. DENNY. 



OBEDIENT SERVICE. 

We read, "The carnal mind is en- 
mity against God; for it is not sub- 
ject to the law of God, neither in- 
deed can be." For they that are 
after the flesh do mind the things 
of the flesh ; but they that are after 
the Spirit (do mind) the things of 
the Spirit, For to be carnally mind- 
ed is death; but to be spiritually 
minded is life and peace." (Not 
life and confusion ; but life and 
peace) . 

Jesus was the sinless servant of 
God. He came not to do His own 
will; but the will of His Father. He 
said, "It is enough for the disciple 
to be as his master, and the servant 
as his Lord." "And Jesus sat dow 
and called the twelve, and said un- 
to them, if any man desire to be 
first, the same shall be last of all, 
and the servant of all, and He took 
a child and set him in the midst of 
them; and when He had taken him 
in his arms, he said unto them, 
"Whosoever shall receive one of 
such children in my name, receiveth 
me, and whoso receiveth me, receiv- 
eth not me, but Him that sent me." 

Therefore, Jesus was the sent 
one of God, and became the servant 
of all His people, and the true, and 
faithful servant of His Father. 

The faithful servant reports the 
correct status of his stewardship. 
As such, Jesus said, "I have glori- 
fied THEE on the earth." He did 
not fail to ascribe all the glory to 
the Father, saying, "My Father 
worketh and I work hitherto." "I 
have finished the work Thou gavest 
me to do, I have manifested Thy 
Name unto the men which Thou 
, gavest me." 

Since Christ is head of the 
Church, as man is head of the wife, 
we conclude that Christ hath mani- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



59 



fested the Father's Name to the 
women and children of the King- 
dom as well as to the men, which he 
says, "Thou gavest me." 

He said to the Father, "All mine 
are thine, and all thine are mine, 
and I AM GLORIFIED IN THEM." 

We ascribe unto God all the glory 
in our redemption, preservation, 
resurrection and eternal glorifica- 
tion. We dare not charge God with 
our folly, and can say from the 
heart, "My sins hath like a moun- 
tain risen and by them I am slain." 
Being taught the exceeding sinful- 
ness of sin, we look not to man for 
relief, nor to earth for a safe place 
of refuge ; but look, by faith, to God 
and to Christ for every help in time 
of need. 

Sin is born of the flesh and the 
devil. "Whosoever is born of God 
doth not commit sin; for his seed 
remaineth in him and he cannot sin, 
because he is born of God." Scrip- 
tural sayings like the sayings of 
men, often must be interpreted in 
the light of other sayings. The 
same writer who said "He that is 
born of God doth not commit sin," 
also said. "If we say we have no 
sin, we deceive ourselves, and the 
truth is not in us." The fact is very 
clearly taught, that God is light, 
and in him no darkness at all, that 
God doth not sin, cannot sin ; but let 
every man know, that; when he -is 
tempted to sin and led astray that it 
is the result of his own lust, for 
when lust is conceived it bringeth 
forth sin, and when sin is finished 
it bringeth forth death. 

All sin, therefore, brings us into 
a state of condemnation, from which 
state there is no escape save through 
the imputed righteousness of the 
Lord Jesus Christ. 

O. J. DENNY. 



CHARGE. 

From request of some brethren, I 
will give, as memory serves, through 
Zion's Landmark, a brief synopsis 
of the charge to Elder T. R. Craw- 
ford, when he was ordained the 
third Sunday in November, 1930. 

My dear young brother, the 
church and Presbytery are agreed 
that you have been called to minis- 
try of the Word; for they have 
heard you preach the gospel, which 
is the best evidence that one is call- 
ed of God to the work. The out- 
ward qualifications as given by Paul 
to Timothy, the church says you 
possess in a marked degree. 

Now, let me in the first place 
thank God for putting you into the 
ministry ; and may you with Paul 
say, "I thank Christ Jesus our Lord, 
who hath enabled me, for that he 
counted me faithful, putting me into 
the ministry." However great your 
gift, may you also say with Paul : 
"Unto me, who am the least of all 
saints, is this grace given, that I 
should preach among the Gentiles 
the unsearchable riches of Christ." 
But whatever your gift is, you must 
be endowed with grace to enable 
you to use it humbly and faithfully. 
It will well become you to study the 
scriptures with earnest prayer that 
God may open and reveal to your 
understanding their meaning; and 
then study how to impart this 
knowledge to your hearers in the 
simplest and clearest language you 
can command. Make full proof of 
your ministry to the church — you 
need not expect to do so to the 
world, for you can never make it be- 
lieve that salvation is of the Lord, 
and by grace. 

While God's servants have dif- 
ferent gifts, all are "for the perfect- 
ing of the saints, for the work of the 



60 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ministry, for the edifying of the 
body of Christ: till we all come into 
the unity of the faith" — into the 
same faith, and perfect in the order 
and doctrine of God our Saviour. 
But may you ever remember that no 
servant can employ his gift to the 
good of Zion and the glory of God 
unless grace and spiritual wisdom 
accompany it. While you should 
have power over your own spirit, 
do not forget that you are entirely 
dependent upon the Holy Spirit for 
spiritual guidance. As "Every man 
hath his proper gift of God, one 
after this manner, and another after 
that," be yourself in your gift, and 
do not try to imitate any man; for 
who is there among the Lord's ser- 
vants that is esteemed by the whole 
church as a model preacher? As a 
rule each lives and dies without 
leaving his style for another preach- 
er. Yea; you will disgust the 
church, and be a failure, if you try 
to preach like some one you 
would like to model after. 

You will most likely have some 
brethren, and would be preachers, 
who may venture to tell you how 
and what you should preach. These 
will be worth about as much to you 
as Job's comforters were to him. 

Now that you have been called 
to pastorate one church; and in 
course of time you will be called to 
serve other churches, your accept- 
ance or rejection should be a matter 
of deep and prayerful concern to 
you. You will be anxious to know 
if the Lord gave you to the church, 
and the church to you. Should you 
be willing to serve, do so faithfully 
with your trust in God, and look 
not to the liberal or illiberal moods 
of the church. At the end of your 
obligation, should she call you 
again, and the church hath suffer- 



ed you to bear the burden, or ex- 
pense of the service, you may gos- 
pelly refuse, being assured that the 
Lord had not given you to the 
church, else he would have led her 
to administer to your natural needs. 
Just as you serve the Lord, you will 
serve his people. Aside from your 
interest in your preaching matter, 
you will have much concern as to 
how you shall conduct the church 
affairs with a view to the welfare 
of each member. It will be most 
needful for you to take heed to 
yourself, "and to all the flock over 
the which the Holy Ghost hath 
made you overseers, to feed the 
church of God which he hath pur- 
chased with his own blood." In 
feeding the sheep be careful that 
you do not get the feed troughs so 
high and feed with such strong 
meat as may starve the lambs. 

Now, that your calling makes you 
an example and a standard bearer 
of the church, you should live a 
clean and upright life, shunning ev- 
ery appearance of evil. Your use- 
fulness as a minister depends on 
such deportment. Your sermons 
may not occupy more than two or 
three hours each week, whereas 
your conduct is in evidence every 
day. So watch your steps, for you 
may rest assured that the church 
and the world will watch you; and 
may you watch against self-confi- 
dence, and pray for the faith that 
comes in the communication of the 
grace of God. Watch that Satan 
does not tempt you with a covetous 
spirit, and to sow to the flesh. 

Be not disheartened if the world, 
or some designing, traitorous apos- 
tate should speak evil of you false- 
ly, or fear his calumny, which ema- 
nates from an envious, jealous and 
wicked heart, for he will soon kill 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



61 



himself with his own sword, like 
Saul and Judas. Finally, may you 
have ^race to bear afflictions "as a 
good soldier of Jesus Christ;" and, 
remember "all that will live godly 
in Christ shall suffer persecution." 

Take this Bible, and let its teach- 
ing be your guide in order, doc- 
trine and discipline, and you will 
have safe footing in the church of 
God. 

M. L. GILBERT. 

P. S. — The charge given to the 
church will follow. 



Remarks 

At the close of the charge given 
to Eld. T. R. Crawford's ordination, 
I made some remarks somewhat as 
follows: 

Dear household of faith, may you 
continue to love and pray for this 
faithful servant that God has given 
the church. He is surely worthy of 
your tender care. He is a servant 
whom the Lord has been very mer- 
ciful, and has abundantly blessed 
his labors. And you should es- 
teem him very highly for his work's 
sake. 

You may never know the anxie- 
ties, griefs, and wrestlings that a 
true servant of God has from the* 
state of the church at times, for her 
trials, sorrows, hurts, back-slidings 
and tribulations becomes his with 
deep sorrow, when he learns that 
any member is affected. His soul 
interest is for the peace, union and 
comfort of each member of Zion; 
yea the Church's welfare, or adver- 
sity is unto him as if it was person- 
ally his own. While you should 
greatly esteem him for his gift and 
work's sake, never worship or idol- 
ize him; and never think or hold 
him so high that you cannot see 
Christ above him. The church at 



Corinth once thought so much of 
Paul that they could have plucked 
out their eyes; but when he began 
to tell them of their sins and trans- 
gressions, they were ready to say 
"his bodily presence is weak, and 
his speech contemptible." 

Be ever willing to go to him 
about your church and spiritual 
matters, but do not trouble him 
with your worldly affairs. You 
may go to him with your spiritual 
concerns, but do not take up too 
much of his time with your com- 
plaints. You may be taking up 
some of the time he wants to devote 
to others or with his Lord. Pray 
for him that he may be kept sound 
in body and mind jnany years; and 
for his soul that may be kept clean 
and pure as a burning and shining 
light, a blessing to the church. Hold 
up his hands while he devotes his 
time to the church, by looking af- 
ter and administering to his ma- 
terial necessities. Remember, that 
your servant may have as much or 
even more business talent than any 
of you, and do well in certain occu- 
pations or avocations in the business 
world ; but he cannot serve church- 
es and be about the Lord's work, 
and hold a job as you do. As he 
loves his family as you do yours, I 
am sure, when not engaged in the 
church and gospel work, he will be 
doing what he can for the suste- 
nance and welfare of his loved ones. 
I trust your love for him and the 
cause of the church will cause you 
to assist him in material things as 
the Lord prospers you. 

M. L. GILBERT. 



THE SWORD OF THE LORD AND 
OF GIDEON. 

And the three companions bleAv 
the trumpets, and broke the pitch- 



62 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ers, and held the lamps in their 
left hands, and the trumpets in 
their right hands to blow withal, 
and they cried, the sword of the 
Lord, and of Gideon. Judges 7:20. 
This is no small portion of the won- 
derful narrative concerning the 
Lord's delivery of his chosen peo- 
ple, Israel from the hand of Midian 
by his chosen servant Gideon. The 
children of Israel had sinned and 
the Lord had delivered them into 
the hand of Midian, for to be pun- 
ished, and they were greatly op- 
pressed, and they cried unto the 
Lord, and the Lord sent his angel, 
who called to their minds the fact 
that he had brought them out of 
Egypt and delivered them from all 
their enemies, and said unto them, 
I am the Lord your God, fear not 
the gods of the Amorites jn whose 
land ye dwell, but ye have not obey- 
ed my voice. And the Lord sent his 
angel to Gideon, who said to him 
the Lord is with thee. So Gideon 
comes to the front, for the Lord has 
called him, but he like all men who 
are called of God, is full of ques- 
tioning and wants additional evi- 
dence, and the Lord who is full of 
mercy indulged him and graciously 
gave him the signs he asked for, 
and when all seemed to be in readi- 
ness the Lord said to Gideon, the 
people are too many for me to give 
the Midianites into their hands, 
lest Israel vaunt themselves against 
me, saying, mine own hand hath 
saved me. So he told Gideon to 
tell all those who were afraid to 
return early from Mount Gilead, 
and there returned twenty and two 
thousand, and there remained ten 
thousand. As Israel all told were 
only thirty two thousand, and the 
enemy were one hundred and thirty 
five thousand, does it not look like 



they all would have been afraid? 
They would have, but for faith in 
their God, whom they knew was not 
dependent on numbers and carnal 
weapons. The Lord always does 
things at such times, and in such 
ways as will show that it is his 
hand and not man's that gains the 
victory. So he said again to Gid- 
eon, the people are still too many, 
and armed, not with spears and 
swords, but with trumpets; and 
empty pitchers with lamps in them. 
Poor weapons of war, man would 
say, but they proved to be very ef- 
fectual. We notice that Gideon 
divided the three hundred into three 
companies of one hundred each, 
and said to all of them, look on me, 
and as I do, so do ye. Gideon, in 
this war is a type of Jesus, in the 
gospel, and the three companions 
were to look on Gideon, and do as 
he did. So the Lord's people in all 
three dispensations, the patriotic, 
the prophetic, and Apostolic, are to 
look to Jesus, and do as he does, or 
in other words be followers of him. 
Abel saw him by faith, and offered 
a lamb typical of his sufferings and 
death. Moses esteemed the re- 
proaches of Christ greater riches 
than the treasures of Egypt, and the 
apostles said. Lord to whom shall 
we go, thou hast the words of eter- 
nal life. O, how good the Lord is 
to poor sinners, often giving them 
more than they ask for. He gave 
Gideon all the signs he asked for 
and then when he finally told him 
to go down to the enemy with the 
three hudred, he said, but if thou 
fear to go down take thy servant 
Pharah, and go to the border of the 
host, and he should hear a thing* 
t^at v/ould strengthen him. And 
so he did not the three hundred 
weiT arranged in order and told to 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



63 



go forward, and Gideon and those 
with him came to the border of the 
camp. They blew the trumpets 
and brake the pitchers (earthen 
vessels) typical of these earthen 
vessels, the bodies in which they 
have the treasure, even in the king- 
dom of God, these earthen vessels 
must be broken. Paul said we are 
the circumcision who worship God 
in the Spirit, rejoice in Christ Jesus 
and have no confidence in the flesh. 
When the earthen vessels are out of 
the way then the light (Jesus) 
shines. They blew the trumpets, 
typical of the preached gospel. It 
shall come to pass in that day that 
the great trumpet shall be blown, 
etc., Isaiah. And as they blew and 
the light shined they cried, the 
sword of the Lord, and of Gideon, 
there is no sword so mighty as the 
light of the knowledge of the glory 
of God in the face of Jesus Christ. 
John says, This is the message that 
we declare unto you, that God is 
light, and in him is no darkness at 
all, every enemy gives way before 
the light of God's eternal truth, 
whether that enemy be on the out- 
side or on the inside of the child of 
God. We notice that this light of 
gospel truth is the sword of the Lord 
and of Gideon and in the hand of 
the Lord it is the power of God unto 
Salvation to every one that believ- 
eth. It is sufficient to quicken the 
dead. In the hand of the servant 
of God, it slays all opposition to 
truth, lights the path of the child of 
God and comforts their hearts in be- 
lieving in Jesus, and does not re- 
ouire a multitude. One armed with 
this sword, the light of God's word, 
can chase a thousand and two put 
ten thousand to flight. Among the 
enemy every man's sword was turn- 
ed against his fellow. So in Baby- 



lon they are trying to break down 
one falsehood with another. Hence 
there is confusion and opposition. 
While in the house of the Lord, un- 
der the sweet influence of his holy 
spirit they see eye to eye, and speak 
the same things, each one seeking 
not their own, but the things of an- 
other. They have love one to an- 
other, and together they sing the 
song of Moses, the servant of God, 
and the song of the Lamb. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



HELP US ALL YOU CAN 

The depression has hit us hard 
for our overhead is heavy and we 
will appreciate it if all who owe 
anything on the Landmark would 
remit all they can spare. We would 
like for every subscriber to send in a 
new name and thus aid in extending 
its circulation. 

J. D. GOLD. 



CHARLES ANDREW WEEKS. 

Charles Andrew Weeks was born April 
23rd, 1853, died November 7th., 1929. 
The son of Silas and Celestia Weeks, he 
was married to Marthy Hugh Annie Pitt- 
man, (daughter of Wiley and Charlotte 
Pittman) on March 23rd., 1876, and unto 
them were born five children, three girls 
and two boys: Viva Earl, Estelle Pittman; 
David Arnold, Hugh Andrew, and Rejoice 
Elizabeth; all of whom together with his 
faithful wife were left to mourn his de- 
parture. He was a kind husband and 
father, also a good neighbor and follow- 
ed liis calling as an industrious farmer, 
until the infirmities of age came upon 
him. It was during his last days while 
very feeble, that he came before the church 
at Williams, related his hope in Christ 
(which he had many years) was received 
and baptized. 

His feeling of unworthiness, and desire 
for more evidence, caused him much 
t!oul)le; though he was a regular attend- 
ant at tlie church he loved, and at last 
camo with that same little hope received 
lout; before. God's children walk by 
Faith, not by light, and hope for that 
which they see not; and we Know that 
man of them as did Bro. Weeks miss much 
enjoyment of this service; by not taking 
up tlie cross when first receive a hope, ac- 
■■ordiiig to the command of our Lord and 



64 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Saviour, Jesus Christ. 

We feel he has entered into that rest, 
which remaineth for the children of God, 
and we sorrow not as those who have no 
hope. 

Done by order of conference. 

J. C. MOORE, Mod. 
C. H. SPIVEY, Clerk. 



DEACON G. B. ROEBUCK 

The subject of this sketch was our dear- 
ly beloved brother in Christ, our deacon 
and Oh! how we miss and grieve to give 
him up, yet, we bow in humble submission 
to God's will, believing He does all things 
well. 

He was born March 10, 1890, died No- 
vember 4, 1930, making his stay on earth 
40 years, seven months, 25 days. He was 
married to Myrtle Gurganus November 3, 
1914. To this union were born three chil- 
dren, Elmer Louis, 15; Virginia Ruth, 13, 
and George, Jr., 10 years of age. All of 
whom survive to mourn their loss, with a 
number of relatives and friends. 

Brother Roebuck united with the church 
at Briery Swamp Saturday before the sec- 
ond Sunday in June, 19 22, and was bap- 
tized the next day by Elder B. S. Cowin. 
Was ordained deacon second Sunday in 
March, 19 25; this position he filled faith- 
fully and lovingly until his death, and can 
truthfully say. He died in full fellowship 
with the church. He loved the church at 
Briery Swamp and never failed to fill his 
seat unless providentially hindered. He was 
well known in many churches, and was 
loved by all who knew him. They loved him 
for the love he manifested to the church, 
they could see the light of Jesus shining 
in his countenance. He sincerely believed 
that God was the author of good and not 
evil. He talked and walked in his belief 
ever looking to Jesus the way, the truth 
and the life. 

His funeral was conducted at his home 
by his beloved pastor. Elder J. L. Ross, and 
his former pastor. Elder B. S. Cowin, they 
both spoke ably and very comforting to the 
bereaved family and friends, after which 
his body was laid to rest in the Roebuck 
family burying ground. 

While death is the saddest word we 
know and will take all joy out of life for 
a while, yet it is such a comfort to have 
the evidence that such a loved one has fal- 
len asleep in Jesus. Dear brother, it grieves 
us to give you up, your seat is vacant in 
our church, but there still remains a burn- 
ing love in our hearts for you. We feel to 
have needed you so much. "God only 
knows on whom the armor will fall, still 
we believe that God is able and will raise 
up children unto Abraham. 

To Sister Roebuck his dear wife, who 
doubtless misses his presence so much as 
he was her constant companion at all 
times, we would say he has gone on before 



and we must soon follow. Grieve not, as 
for one whom you have no hope. For 
blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, 
for their works do follow them. To the be- 
reaved children whose hearts seem crush- 
ed, you should have no regrets, only the 
separation we know is painful indeed. To 
his dear mother. Sister Jackie Ann Roe- 
buck, we say, may God comfort you and 
bless you so your last days may be your 
best days on earth and be resigned to "Thy 
will be done on earth as it is in Heaven." 
Dear brother in our meeting we feel your 
presence still we realize you are dwelling 
in a house not made with hands but eter- 
nal in Heaven. May it be His blessed will 
when He comes with all His Holy angels 
that we shall all rise in the likeness of 
Christ, join you, see Him as He is and be 
satisfied. 

Done by order of conference Saturday 
before second Sunday in November, 1930. 
ELDER J. L. ROSS, Mod. 
C. L. JAMES, C. C. 

B. D. MOORE, 

C. L. JAMES, 

Committee. 



CH.ARLES H. SHEPARD 
Charles H. Shepard was born Jan. 29 

1883 and departed this life Oct. 3, 1930 
at the age of 4 7 years, 9 months and 6 
days. He was the son of H. H. Shepard 
and Mary Shepard. In the year 1910 on 
October 19th, he was married to Miss 
Annie Rawls. To this union were born 
six children; one girl and five boys. 

He was a devoted husband and father 
and highly esteemed by all who knew him. 
He was honest and industrious, showing 
himself a pattern of good works. 

He united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church on the first Sunday in June 1930 
at a meeting at his home. His wife also 
joined at the same time. They were bap- 
tised the following Monday by the writer. 

Mr. Shepard was afflicted for some time 
with stomach trouble which proved to be 
a cancer. He was confined to his bed for 
about eight weeks and suffered greatly, 
but bore his affliction with much patience, 
trusting in hope of salvation by grace. He 
greatly enjoyed attending meeting for sev- 
eral years before he united with the 
church. All was done that loving hands 
and earthly phy&icians could do but God 
saw fit to take Him home to Himself 
where we hope to meet where no sorrow, 
pain or death can ever come. 

He leaves to mourn their loss an aged 
father and mother, his companion, six 
children, two brothers, one sister and 
many relatives and friends, yet we mourn 
not as those without hope, trusting that 
he has heard that welcoming sound, "Child 
your Father calls, come home." 

Written by one who loved him as a bro- 
ther in Christ, I hope. 

R. W. Gurganus. 



.J 7-4:.- -lA)ii&^-.. 

ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 



WILSON, NORTH CAKv. ' 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL B^/ ; ST 

VOL. LXIV. JANUARY 15, 1931 No. 5 

NOTHING IMPOSSIBLE WITH GOD. 

But Jehoshaphat said, Is there not here a prophet of the Lord, that we 
may enquire of the Lord by him? And one of the kings of Israel's ser- 
vants answered and said, here is Elisha, the son of Shaphat, which poured 
water on the hands of Elijah. 

And Jehoshaphat said, the word of the Lord is with him. So the king 
of Israel and Jehoshaphat and the king of Edom went down to him. 

And Elisha said unto the king of Israel, what have I to do with thee. 
Get thee to the prophets of thy father, and to the prophets of thy mother. 
And the king of Isi-ael said unto him. Nay; for the Lord hath called 
these three kings together, to deliver them into the hands of Moab. 

And Elisha said, as the Lord of hosts liveth before whom I stand, surely, 
were it not that I regard the presence of Jehoshaphat, I would not look 
towards thee nor see thee. 

But now bring me a minstrel. And it came to pass, when the minstrel 
played, that the hand of the Lord came upon him. And he said, thus 
saith the Lord, make this valley full of ditches, for thus saith the Lord, 
ye shall not see wind, neither shall ye see rain, yet that valley shall be 
filled with water, and you may drink, both ye and your cattle, and your 
beasts: 

And this is but a light thing in the sight of the Lord: 

He will deliver the Moabites also into your hands. — 2 Kings 3:11-18. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
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Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. 0. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



2)evotet) to the Cause of 3^e8U8 Cbdst 



WHEN STANDFIELD SINGS. 

0 pleasant 'tis to hear him sing, 
Those sweet and pleasant songs, 

1 pause to catch the parting strain 
With chorus loud and strong. 

No more I think of sorrows past, 
Nor troubling thoughts caress, 
The sweetest always is the last 
And everyone the best. 

I think no more of daily care, 
My mind's no more employed, 
I grope no more in deep despair, 
I feel no aching void. 

Nothing then can trouble me, 
All cares take to their wings, 
And I ever feel to happy be, 
Whenever Standfield sings. 

I cherish still his pleasant songs. 
Whose melody ever fills 
The heart of him who is athirst. 
And their echo lingers still. 

I fancy now I hear him sing. 
Those songs to me so dear. 
Most pleasant thoughts to me they 
bring, 

My drooping heart they cheer. 

The greatest of joys on earth I find 
Are in the midst of song; 
Like golden chords they seem to 
bind, 

Me to the joyful throng. 

But none seem so sweet to me 
Nor does their memory cling. 
Nor do I feel so full and free. 



And may he sing if God be pleased. 
The drooping hearts to cheer. 
And when his useful life is ceased. 
His memory will be here. 



TAKE HEED. 

Therefore we ought to give the 
more earnest heed to the things 
which we have heard lest at any 
time we should let them slip. — 
Hebrews 2 chapter, 1st verse. 

Elder O. J. Denny and associate 
editors of Zion's Landmark and to 
my well beloved brethren and sis- 
ters in the Lord Jesus. 

Owing to an urgent request from 
the many lovers of truth for me to 
write again, for the Landmark, I 
have decided to do so. 

The portion of scripture at the 
head of this article is in and on my 
mind. 

I do hope that the God of all 
grace will guide my mind and pen 
that I may write something edify- 
ing. The apostle begins this epis- 
tle by saying, God who at sundry 
times and in divers manners spoke 
to the fathers once by the prophets 
has in these last days spoken to us 
by His Son. So we see that God 



And when from us he takes his 
leave, 

And by others is supplied. 
We'll remember still his favorite 
song, 

"Cast down but not destroyed." 

— B. W. Cowen, 
(By Agnes Brake) 



66 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



has and is speaking to us now. My 
brethren has the Lord spoken to 
you? And do you take heed? To 
my mind this means to observe and 
do His commandments, or what he 
tells us to do, and do it like he tells 
us. We are commended not to be 
forgetful hearers of the word, (the 
word of the Lord) ; but be doers, — 
observe and do His will. 

We ought to give the more ear- 
nest heed to the things we have 
heard. Pay careful attention to 
what the Lord says. What have 
we, who fear God, heard him say? 
It is written in the scriptures that 
which we have seen and heard, de- 
clare Ave unto you that you may 
have fellowship with us. And truly 
our fellowship is with the Father 
and with His Son Jesus Christ. 

Let us notice some of the things 
we have heard. It was His word 
that wakened us to a sense and 
knowledge of our duties; then, he 
tells us if we be willing and obed- 
ient we shall eat the good of the 
land. If we shall eat the good of 
the land, by being obedient what 
shall we eat by disobedience? We 
shall get the rod. He says if my 
children transgress my laws and set 
at naught my statutes and judg- 
ments, I will visit their transgres- 
sions with the rod, and their iniqui- 
ties with stripes. Blessed is he that 
knows my will and doeth it. I will 
liken him unto a man that digs 
down and settles his house on a 
rock. The winds blow and beat 
upon that house, but it doesn't fall 
because it is founded on a rock. 
(The Spiritual rock is Christ.) 

Some people are very forgetful 
about what they read in the Scrip- 
tures. They ought not to be for 
holy men of old wrote as they were 
moved by the Holy Ghost. 



If we have forgotten what we 
have read let me tell you where he 
has put it so we can't forget it, and 
that is in the heart of all His chil- 
dren. It is written, I will put my 
law in their inward parts and in 
their hearts will I write it. So they 
that cannot read have no excuse, 
and they that can read have none. 
They all alike have the teachings 
of the spirit to guide us. 

The apostle gives us the reason 
why we ought to give earnest heed 
to the things we have heard, for if 
the things spoken by angels was 
steadfast and every transgression 
and disobedience receives a just 
recompense of reward, "How shall 
we escape, if we neglect so great 
salvation," which at the first began 
to be spoken by the Lord and was 
confirmed unto us by them that 
heard him? 

Now, my beloved, what have you 
heard Him say? He has said unto 
us, "Little children, love one an- 
other." "By this may all men 
know that ye are my disciples if ye 
have love one for the other." 

Paul says, "We know we have 
passed from death unto life because 
we love the brethren." Love is a 
wonderful gift, and is stronger 
than death. Love thinkest no evil, 
love worketh no ill to his neighbor. 
We cannot love the brethren and 
hate them too. "Love hides a mul- 
titude of sins." If we love our 
brethren we will watch over them 
for good, and admonish them with 
the truth in love, and so fulfill the 
law of Christ. 

The scripture says, "be not de- 
ceived, for God is not mocked, for 
whatsoever a man soweth, the same 
shall he reap, as ye measure unto 
men, it shall be measured unto you 
again." 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



67 



The golden rule is "Do unto all 
men as ye would that all men 
should do unto you." If we reap 
good fruits, we must sow good seed. 

Take heed brethren what you 
sow. Self-presumption and preju- 
dices, are bad seed to sow, and it 
makes no difference how rotten 
these seed are- they will come up, 
and the crop or harvest will be so 
great one man can't reap the har- 
vest. You will have to get your 
neighbors to help you. Did you 
never see troubles arise in churches 
and in neighborhoods and they 
would have to get other churches 
and neighbors to settle it. 

When ever a brother becomes 
self presumptuous and prejudiced, 
he is sure to sow evil seed, and it 
will be a case of Hamon and Mor- 
decai. How evil was the work of 
this Hamon against Mordecai. 

Brethren, I believe you are about 
to forget what you have heard, and 
have even let it slip. What have 
you heard? If thy brother tres- 
pass against thee "go and tell him 
his faults, between him and thee 
alone. If he hears thee thou hast 
gained him. If he does not hear, 
take with thee one or two more, if 
he hears them, you have gained 
him. If he wont hear, then tell it 
to the church." 

"If he hears the church thou 
hast also gained him, and saved 
him from error's chain." 

The selfish brother will say to the 
one that offended him, "You ought 
to come to me, and instead will go 
and tell some one that don't know 
anything about it, and has nothing 
to do with it. 

Behold what a big fire a little 
matter kindles, and if you don't 
watch all the brethren and some of 



the friends will have to go to fight- 
ing fire.. 

Paul said, if there be no resur- 
rection of the dead, why are we in 
jeopardy every hour? Yes, dear 
ones, we are in jeopardy all the 
time there are foes without and 
fears within. We have to come to 
Jesus for aid. 

Take heed, brethren. What 
makes it so bad it is not an enemy 
that troubles us but our own family 
friends that eat bread at our house 
that has lifted his heel against me. 

What have you heard him say? 
As God for Christ sake has forgiven 
you your trespasses ye ought to 
forgive one another their trespasses. 

One of the surest marks of a 
child of God is a forgiving heart. 

What else does he say? "Blessed 
are the merciful for they shall ob- 
tain mercy." 

Some of our presumptuous breth- 
ren make up church rings, to sup- 
port themselves, and they will 
bring charges against a poor hum- 
ble brother, and deal with him with- 
out mercy. Brethren this ought 
not to be, for "know ye not if ye 
bite and devour one another, you 
will be consumed one of another." 

Jesus did not come into the world 
to destroy men's lives, but to save 
them, and if we have not the mind 
of Christ we are none of His. 

We had better take more earnest 
heed. He says "blessed are the 
peace makers for they shall be call- 
ed the children of God, and if chil- 
dren then heirs and joint heirs with 
Christ." 

"The fruit of the spirit is love, 
peace, long suffering, gentleness, 
goodness, faith, meekness, temper- 
ance against such there is no law." 
Galatians 5 ch. 22-23 v. 



68 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



"Now the works of the flesh are 
manifest which are these, adultry, 
fornication, uncleanness, lacivious- 
ness, idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, 
variance, emulations, wrath, sedi- 
tion, heresies, envying, murders, 
drunkenness, revilings, and such 
like of the which I tell you before 
as I have also told you in time past, 
that they which do such things 
shall not inherit the kingdom of 
God.— Gal. 5 c 19, 20, 21 v. 

With these scriptures in consid- 
eration, we ought to take heed and 
give the more earnest heed to the 
things we have heard. 

"On this hang all the law, and 
prophets." "Thou shall love thy 
neighbor as thyself." 

The scripture at the head of this 
article is a wonderful text and it 
seems the matter is left with us be- 
cause it says we ought to give the 
more earnest heed. He doesn't say 
we shall or shall not; but says we 
ought to, and, brethren, don't you 
think we ought to heed all of God's 
divine instruction. When we con- 
sider our own joy and happiness? 
He says we ought to wash one an- 
other's feet, and I believe we ought 
to do it. 

It seems to me, beloved brethren, 
that some of us treat the commands 
of our God with contempt, for some 
of us act as though we have never 
tasted the goodness of the Lord, nor 
received any of His mercies. Our 
place is at the feet of Jesus and 
clothed in our right minds. The 
noblest and greatest man on earth, 
to my mind, is the one that confess- 
es his faults (sins) and asketh for- 
giveness. We all sin, we stagger 
out of the way, and the. soul that 
sins shall die. Paul says, "we die 
daily." Said he was crucified to 



the world, and the world was cru- 
cified to him. 

The apostle said "I bear in my 
body the marks of the Lord, Jesus." 
Elder P. D. Gold was one of the 
noblest of his age. It seemed to 
me he walked with Jesus all the 
time. I, your poor unworthy ser- 
vant, lost more in the death of El- 
der Gold than in any one that has 
ever died since I've been in the 
church, if I am in it. I believe El- 
der Gold loved me. I don't have 
to reckon about it, I know he did 
love me, and I know I loved him. 
And to my mind he is or was a won- 
derful example to me. The apos- 
tle says, mark the upright, for the 
end of that man is peace. He was 
my instructor for about 40 years. I 
remember the walks of that saint- 
like man, Sylvester Hassell. 1 
knew him all of his ministerial life. 
He was also my Christian instruc 
tor. I mention these two men be- 
cause we were associated together, 
and we all loved each other. You 
know, the man that is the most 
loved by the Christian is the man 
that is the most like Jesus. If my 
poor heart deceives me not, I love 
all the brethren. After the death 
of Elder Gold, I met that dear Chris- 
tian hearted brother. Elder C. F. 
Denny and asked him if he would 
help me in the way and manner, 
like Elder Gold had done. He told 
me he would and he did so and 
about the time we were getting 
more and more united, the blessed 
Lord took him away, to his eternal 
heavenly home to live with Jesus 
forever, where they will rest from 
their labors and their works do fol- 
low them. 

Brother Denny, I have written 
very much more in this article, than 
I expected to write, but this is such 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



69 



a necessary subject to write on; 
after I got to writing my mind kept 
broadening until it has swelled it 
very largely, and, perhaps, too 
large. 

Brother Denny look this all over 
and if you think it is worth a place 
in the Landmark, you will let it be 
published after you have corrected 
all mistakes. This was written by 
request of some lovers of truth. 

I still remain your poor, weak and 
unworthy and imperfect brother, if 
one at all. 

George Robbins, (Col.) 
907 Elizabeth St. 
Durham, N. C. 



A READER SINCE CHILDHOOD. 

Dear Mr. Gold, and to the 
Household of Faith: 

I have felt impressed for some 
time to write something for the 
Landmark, whether of the spirit, I 
do not know. I have been a reader 
of it almost since childhood, but 
have only been a subscriber since 
the death of my companion. 

I pray that the good Lord will so 
direct my thoughts, and give me 
something to write that will com- 
fort the blessed children of God. 

Although I feel my dependence 
upon God for every good and per- 
fect thought that comes out of this 
corrupt heart of mine. How good it 
is that we are not left alone. I of- 
ten think what a world this would 
be if man could rule, but what a 
blessing it is that no one can rule 
this boundless universe, but God the 
Father, who worketh in us both the 
will and to do of His own good 
pleasure. 

How I love the courts of the Lord 
and her solemn assemble. In my 
view I see a grand, a glorious pro- 
cession marching toward Jerusa- 



lem, the heavenly city, with the 
banner of love over her such love 
no man has ever known, save 
through the precious blood of the 
cross of Christ. What a sure and 
solid foundation is the doctrine of 
revelation, Jesus Christ the rock up- 
on which the Christian hope is 
founded? How dare weak man, 
claim any honor for the salvation of 
sinners? 

Surely he who does has never felt 
himself to be "the chief of sinners." 
As the Great Apostle declared him- 
self to be, when brought to a knowl- 
edge of his helplessness and de- 
pendence upon God. 

The Lord's eyes are ever over His 
people, let their circumstances be 
what they may. He was with Dan- 
iel in the lion's den, the Hebrew 
children in the fiery furnace, Jere- 
miah in the pit, Joseph in the 
prison. Oh, the mighty hand of 
our God ! who can stay his hand that 
His rich blessings shall not abound 
to those He loves! If He loves them 
He will so reveal that love in them 
that they will surely love Him and 
rejoice in His salvation. If I could be 
still and know that He is God. But 
I am brought to that place every 
time before there is any deliverance 
that comes to me. I am glad David 
said the Lord led him by his right 
hand, and that Isaiah said that He 
would lead the blind in paths they 
had not known. These things make 
me hope more in His love and con- 
tinual Fatherly keeping. 

Dear brethren and sisters, I have 
a little hope of Jesus Christ being 
my Saviour, but it seems at times 
that surely I am yet mistaken. How 
hard and rugged is the way to some 
poor pilgrims' feet. Sometimes I 
feel there has been no light shown 
me in the way of my travel. I am 



70 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



afraid, that if there is any, it is hid- 
den. But with all my downsittings 
and uprisings, I hope I am thankful 
that I do believe that there is a God 
of all power, and that all honor and 
glory does belong to Him. The 
thought often comes into my mind, 
how can the Lord so abundantly 
bless me, and I so vile and disobed- 
ient; but bless His holy name. He 
has been a merciful God to me. The 
older I get, the more I am made to 
feel my weakness and sinfulness. 

The thought occurred to me some 
few days ago, if the Lord had for- 
given me, what was his motive for 
doing so? I know there is nothing 
good in me. Sometimes I feel so 
cast down, so weak, so sinful and 
discouraged, I feel like giving up 
and then again, I am made to re- 
joice with rejoicing which cannot 
be expressed. And then I can 
think of the many sweet promises 
that I hope has been given me. He 
surely must be a merciful God. 

Father I am weak and sinful, 
Ever prone to go astray. 
Like a wayward child of error, 
I so often lose my way. 

Lord keep me from sin, show me 
thy ways, teach me thy paths, for 
thou art the God of salvation. Oh, 
yes, many times I have feasted on 
the gospel. Salvation by grace, and 
then again, there is not a crumb for 
poor me. And when I get so low, 
can remember all these sweet prom- 
ises, but they will not reach my 
case. Oh, the depth of riches, both 
of the riches and knowledge of God. 
How unsearchable are his judg- 
ments and his ways past finding 
out. Often when I read, in the 
dear old Landmark some good 
piece that a dear saint of God has 
written, then it is I feel, though we 



are many miles apart, we are taught 
by the same teacher, and that I am 
with them in the spirit. 

But so often I fear I am deceived, 
but if I know my poor heart, I be- 
lieve I do know I love the dear peo- 
ple of God. I have no mother liv- 
ing, but a dear good father to ad- 
vise me. He is such a dear good 
father, never will I repay him for 
what he has done for me. 

Christ is our salvation, whether in 
time or eternity and I trust he is iny 
obedience as I find none in self 
only,as is worked in me by His good 
pleasure. 

Lord bless Zion everywhere, for 
the Lord reign eth. 

Your humble sister, I hope, 

(Mrs.) Elgie Lee Williams, 
Willow Springs, N. C. 



A GOOD TRIP. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

I have just returned home from 
where I have been visiting some 
churches on the coast and despite a 
deep bronchial cold, I have enjoyed 
the trip real well. 

Several, whom I visited, request- 
ed that I let them hear from me 
when I reached home and I am tak- 
ing the liberty to let them hear from 
me through the Landmark for most 
all among those churches read its 
pages. 

I left home on Thursday night, 
Nov. 20, 1930, to attend my regular 
appointment at Kitty Hawk, N. C., 
a lovely church which I have been 
trying to serve nine years. After 
visiting among them, I left on the 
27th, for Grantsboro, the place of 
my old home church and here on 
Saturday and 5th Sunday, we had a 
good meeting with Elder W. W. 
Styron of Roe, N. C., to preach for 
us. His preaching was good and 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



71 



all seemed to enjoy him. Here I 
stopped over a few days at the 
home of my oldest daughter, Mrs. J. 
L. McCotter. After resting awhile, 
on Thursday, Dec. 4, 1 went down in 
Carteret County to Davis Shore and 
spent the night with brother Clif- 
ford Davis then next morning went 
on bus to Atlantic and took mailboat 
to Lola. Here I was met by Elder 
Styron. From here I went to his 
home and spent three nights with 
him. While here I attended the 
regular meeting of Cedar Island 
church, which was a pleasure to 
again meet with the members of 
this church. I spent two nights 
each with Brethren Bernice Good- 
win and J. W. Daniels, visiting the 
homes of others during Sunday. Af- 
ter preaching, the church commem- 
orated the death and sufferings of 
our risen Lord. I greatly enjoyed 
the hospitality of the brethren and 
their meeting. I have always felt 
strongly impressed with the noble 
qualifications of the two deacons of 
this church, and besides they both 
have the same name, "John Smith." 
I again tried to fill an appointment 
at this place on Monday night. 
From here I went to the home of 
brother D. W. Gillikin at Otway, en- 
joyed being with him, his son and 
family. On Wednesday, the weather 
was cold and rainy but I went over 
near North River church to the 
home of Deacon Bedford Lawrence 
whose wife was sick in bed and 
very feeble. She requested that if 
there were not too many present, to 
come over and have preaching in 
her home, and for her benefit we 
went across the road and services 
were held in her home. Bro. Gilli- 
ken then sent me to Beaufort to the 
home of Brother G. W. Ireland. 
While here I visited the home of 



Sister Ida Goodwin and other 
friends in the city. Bro. Ireland is 
a Bible reader and other religious 
works with deep and well settled 
ideas on points of doctrine. 

On Saturday, Dec. 20, Bro. Ire- 
land and myself went over to More- 
head City to attend the regular 
quarterly meeting at Ruhama 
church, where I once served a long 
time as pastor and is now served by 
Elder Styron. We had a good meet- 
ing with all in peace and loving 
fellowship. The church invited 
visitors to seats and agreed to com- 
mune. On Saturday night the pas- 
tor was called away to hold burial 
services of a departed sister. The 
services were conducted on the 
next day with fear and trembling, 
by the unworthy writer, and in the 
administration of the Lord's supper 
I was made glad to mingle and par- 
take with them as lovely a band in 
true gospel order. The sovereign 
rights of this church have been as- 
sailed, but outside of this distress, 
her members have stood together in 
peace and are sound in the faith. 
All during my service and monthly 
visits among them, I was expected 
to see every member every time I 
went to the church and so punctual 
were they that if any failed to ap- 
pear, then after service, some one 
volunteered to go at once and see 
them, fully believing such were sick 
or in some way seriously hindered. I 
would like to have visited more of 
the homes at Morehead City than I 
did but owing to my short stay 
there, I could not. 

All these churches I have found 
strong in the faith and doctrine, 
with good order and loving fellow- 
ship prevailing among them and 
with their pastor. 

I have visited several other places 



72 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



which I have not mentioned, trust- 
ing no one will take any exceptions, 
for to mention every place and 
name would make this article rather 
lengthy. In all this trip I tried to 
speak 21 times with the sweetest 
liberty I ever enjoyed. My mind 
has since fallen dull and cold, 
wondering will the Lord be gracious 
to me any more. "The Lord giveth 
and the Lord taketh away, blessed 
be His name." 
Yours in hope, 

J. P. Tingle, 

Raleigh, N. C. 



GIVE UNTO THE LORD THE 
GLORY DUE UNTO HIS NAME. 

"Give unto the Lord the glory due 
unto His name ; worship the Lord in 
the beauty of 'holiness." 

Thus we find David rendering un- 
to God true allegiance and admon- 
ishing us who have been regener- 
ated and born of the holy Spirit to 
worship God in deed and in truth, 
for David also says, "Sing unto the 
Lord, O ye Saints of his, and give 
thanks at the remembrance of His 
holiness." How wonderful and 
marvelous to have evidence of a 
hope so sublime. To feel that God 
for Christ's sake has pardoned all 
our sin, yes to have living and trust- 
ing hope, that Christ Jesus has ran- 
somed us and saved us from the law 
of sin and death, becoming our 
Surety and Saviour, redeeming us 
from all sin. Indeed, we should 
give unto the Lord the glory due 
unto His name and worship Him in 
the beauty of holiness. I am hop- 
ing and trusting in God alone for 
Salvation and into his hand I com- 
mit my spirit, for thou hast redeem- 
ed me, and my greatest desire is to 
love thee more and serve thee bet- 
ter. Much past experience has 



taught me, that vain is the help or 
works of man. I must confess and 
know that the word of the Lord is 
right; and that all his works are 
done in truth and righteousness and 
that his counsel shall stand forever, 
and that he will do all his pleasure. 
This is contrary to the mind of na- 
ture, but God's work is above and 
subdues the haughty spirit of the 
flesh and humbles us to the extent 
that all our former trust is destroy- 
ed and then we can and do confess 
all our transgressions unto the Lord 
and beg for his mercy to deliver our 
soul from death. Then when the 
Lord in such gracious and unmerit- 
ed mercy has pardoned our sins and 
given us a hope, we are most cer- 
tainly prepared and willing to "give 
unto the Lord the glory due unto 
his name," and also wish with all 
our heart, mind and soul to worship 
the Lord in the beauty of holiness. 
Dear reader can you, or will you for 
a moment, return with me to the 
time and place of deliverance and 
remember the calmness and sweet- 
ness of that blessed hour, when the 
praise of God filled every fibre of 
your being, at peace with God and 
man, when even the little birds flit 
from bough to bough in the then 
most beautiful forest, when every 
thing was praising God and your 
soul so full it could hold no more; 
but in anthems of praise, burst forth 
singing, 

"Amazing grace, how sweet the 
sound, 

That saved a wretch like me. 
I once was lost but now I'm found. 
Was blind, but now I see." 

Also praise the Lord, O my soul, 
and all that is within me, praise His 
holy name. Then after all of this 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



73 



rapture and peace of mind, to find 
the tempter ready to follow and tell 
as that we are deluded and through 
the weakness of the flesh, we are 
made to mourn, doubt and fear that 
we have caught the shadow and 
missed the substance, but the Lord 
is our refuge and strength and will 
never leave nor forsake us. He is 
our God and will be our shield and 
protector. Then let us give unto 
the Lord the glory due unto His 
name, and beg him to restore unto 
us the joy of his Salvation and keep 
us from evil. The carnal nature 
leads to sin, but David prayed to 
God for deliverance and the Lord 
assures us of divine protection, and 
tells us that, as far as the east is 
from the west, so far hath he re- 
moved our transgressions from us. 
And that like a father pitieth his 
children, so the Lord pitieth them 
that fear Him. O, how sweet and 
blessed is such assurance. 

Then let us exclaim and say, 
"Blessed be the God and Father of 
our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath 
blessed us with all Spiritual bless- 
ings in heavenly places in Christ, ac- 
cording as He hath chosen us in 
Him before the foundation of the 
world." Those so blessed are call- 
ed out of darkness unto His mar- 
velous light and should walk wor- 
thy of such heavenly calling and 
keep ourselves from idols, and not 
continue in sin, but in such way, 
that we show forth the praises of 
Him who has been so merciful to 
us. The more we behold the glory 
of God in the face of Jesus Christ, 
the more will we realize our own 
sinfulness and vileness as men and 
women in the flesh. Then, the 
more we grow in the knowledge of 
truth and righteousness the more 
sensible we are of our own corrup- 



tions and imperfections here in our 
mortal bodies. Then let us pray 
often to our Heavenly Father for 
grace to enable us to serve Him 
with reverence and godly fear. 
Now, for quite awhile, yes for forty 
four years since I became a member 
of the church, I have regularly 
attended upon church services be- 
sides many other general and Asso- 
ciational Meetings and very painful 
to relate, but I have observed a 
num.ber of men, as I understand, 
who could and did preach the letter 
of the word eloquently and firmly 
but yet seemed to know nothing of 
the gospel of peace, for confusion 
and strife has followed such men 
and for my very life, I cannot feel 
that they are sent of God, for a good 
Shepherd certainly does not scatter 
the flock. Before closing, I want 
to ask an interest in the prayers of 
the Lord's humble people. I trust 
no evil motive prompted this letter. 
So give unto the Lord the glory due 
unto His name and Him in the 
beauty of holiness. 

Yours in hope, 
J. W. JONES. 
Peachland, N. C. 



EXPERIENCE. 

(A letter written by Mrs. Speight 
before she died.) 

Dear Sister Melissa Tyson: 
At your request I will try to give 
you some of my pathway. I feel 
embarrassed in the attempt but you 
know my weakness, both spiritually 
and physically and I know you will 
forgive. 

At the age of nineteen I was mar- 
ried to Josiah Bennett Speight, dur- 
ing the year of 1877. In the course 
of three years my health began to 
fail from nervous affliction. I 
grew worse until I was bedfast. My 



74 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



tribulations were many. I felt to 
be a stumbling block to all around 
me, but I was well cared for. I 
knew there was something going on 
within me but I knew not what. I 
had always loved the old Baptists 
but had no idea that I ever would 
unite with them. I felt that they 
would not even want my name 
among them. When I had been in 
bed eighteen months my husband 
took me to his father's for a change. 
I was soon asked if I did not want 
to hear preaching. I was surprised 
and knew not what to answer but 
said "yes." They sent for Elder D. 
A. Mewborn to come and preach 
for me. He came Monday after- 
noon. While he was opening up 
his sermon the Lord appeared to me 
in the form of a cloud about three 
feet above my head, sent His spirit 
into my heart, and forgave me my 
sins. I felt easy, happy, and light. 
It was a Heaven below, my Re- 
deemer to know. I loved every- 
body. I felt I had been changed in 
the twinkling of an eye. Old things 
had passed away. Behold, all 
things had become new. I felt that 
I wouldn't see any more trouble and 
remained in that condition for nine 
days, wearing my golden slippers. 
I was then impressed with baptism. 
My trouble returned. I did not see 
how I could be baptised as I could 
sit up but little. On Wednesday 
night I was tempted to start praying 
to the Lord to deliver me from bap- 
tism as I felt so unworthy. But the 
rod grew heavier and heavier until 
I was made to promise the Lord, If 
He would spare me until day, to 
make an attempt. I found relief 
and went to sleep. My father-in- 
law got up before day to smoke his 
pipe. I asked him if he would go 
to see Elder Mewborn and tell him 



I wanted to see him again. He 
came that night. I told him some 
of my feelings. He told me to send 
for Bennett to come and carry me to 
Meadow Church Saturday. He came 
and placed me in the foot of the 
buggy like a dog and I felt like a 
dog. Eld. Mewborn, and Eld. Jesse 
Baker preached my . feelings. I 
felt that someone had told them my 
troubles. I was received and 
placed in a chair and baptised at 
once by Elder Mewborn. I return- 
ed home improved and visited the 
churches, but was soon confined 
again where I remained for twelve 
years with satan to tempt and mo- 
lest me. 

Dear sister, I feel that I have had 
some sweet visitations from on high. 

"I will pass on until the first Sun- 
day in September, 1922. While I 
was at the dinner table the Lord 
visited me. I felt his spirit hover 
over me. I was made happy with 
his presence. I felt like singing, 
"How happy are they who their 
Saviour obey." I am happy in the 
Lord and don't want to stay forever 
here. I remained in this condition 
for seventeen years and then He 
went away. I have since craved 
that sweet manifestation of His 
holy spirit to return and remain 
with me, that my prison would be 
a palace. 

Some of these things were writ- 
ten in my mind, and printed in my 
heart thirty-eight years ago. You 
must excuse me as it is hard for me 
to dictate for someone else to write. 
I am still a great sufferer, but trust- 
ing to the Great, I am, 

Your unworthy sister, 
Mrs. Winnie Speight, 
Winterville, N. C. 
Sept. 10, 1925. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



75 



A GOOD LETTER. 

Mr. John D, Gold, 
Dear Friend : 

Here is a good letter from a pre- 
cious brother and sister, Elder D. S. 
Webb and wife. I hope you will 
give it space in the dear old Land- 
mark. 

I am old and afflicted in body 
and in mind. At times I cannot 
have a righteous thought, while at 
other times my soul is filled with 
praise and adoration to my God; 
the God of the whole earth who 
gave me nobler birth, free from sin, 
shame and degradation, born of 
God who is pure and holy without 
sin in any sense. He that is born of 
God doth not commit sin, for His 
seed remaineth within him, that is 
Christ formed in you the hope of 
Glory and He never has nor never 
will sin. He is love; born of God 
who is love everlasting and it is im- 
possible for Him to sin. He is too 
wise to err. Guile was never found 
in His mouth. God said He was be- 
fore the world. He was God then, 
is now, and ever will be. His is un- 
changeable in all His ways, or in 
His divine attributes and we should 
walk in them, blameless before Him 
in love, as much as possible. 

Of course this flesh is vile and 
corrupt. It is with the flesh we 
serve the law of sin, but with the 
spirit we serve the law of God. He 
seeketh such to worship Him as do 
worship Him, in spirit and in truth. 
Christ is the way, the truth and the 
life and when Christ, who is our 
life, doth appear, we shall also ap- 
pear with Him in glory. We often 
feel a foretaste of that glory as we 
journey along here in the world, 
and if it be thus glorious here, what 
must it be to be there where all is 



joy, peace and love; all in the spirit 
of our God; in praise and adoration, 
eternally to His great, grand and 
glorious name. 

Yours in hope and with love, 
J. R. JONES, 

Rockford, N. C, 
Route 1, Box 74. 



The Letter. 

James R. Jones, 

Rockford, N. C, 
Dear and precious brother: 

On my return from Pine Grove 
church Lula said, "Received a let- 
ter from Bro. J. R. Jones." I am 
glad you are able to write. I would 
have written you before now if I 
had known your address. Have 
continually thought of you since 
you left the mill, and have felt anx- 
ious about you lest we might hear 
you had passed away." However, 
we should have felt — "He rests 
from his labours and is at rest — in 
the blessed Saviour." Which is 
far better; to be delivered from all 
sorrow and pain, to be present with 
the Lord whose throne is in heaven. 
"And what must it be to be there!" 
We sometimes have a longing desire 
to know what the joys will be? 
Whilst we are feeding on the rich 
and sweet foretastes of God's love 
now. The rich fountain of God's 
love is a living spring flowing in 
the heart of his people. And thanks 
to His Holy Name, this well of liv- 
ing water never runs dry, and al- 
ways remains pure. It may be ob- 
scured and hid for a time by gross 
obstructions of the flesh and the 
devil. But, it will come again with 
its purity. 

Our faith and hope is in the Lord 
who is able and will keep his prom- 
ises. And I hold God's word above 
all the whims of men, let them be 



76 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



who they may. Some in writing 
give no credit to God's word, and 
prophecy "that the Catholic gets in 
legal power, and rule out the 
church" — when the blessed word 
of God declares that He will set up 
His kingdom that shall break in 
pieces all other kingdoms and to the 
peace, and increase of "His king- 
dom" there shall be no end. False 
teachers can enter in and mar the 
peace of the church. The church 
of God is one in Christ. And all 
other kingdoms are of men and 
these kingdoms are broken in 
pieces, one piece is denominated, 
one thing and another is called by 
another name, on, on and on in bro- 
ken denominations. Even so, we 
see the church of the one faith that 
God set up by Christ Jesus and de- 
livered unto it or us all the ordi- 
nances and examples to follow in 
whilst these broken factions of 
kingdoms of men do not — nor will 
not accept the things the Lord did 
set apart that his people should do. 
The denominations are divided 
against what Jesus set apart. Dear 
brother, may the Lord give you 
strength for the day and bless you 
with every need. I often think of 
dear brother Thomas Jones. Greet 
him with our love in Christ. 

May God bless you both is the 
fruit of our heart. 

Your brother and sister in hope, 
D. Smith and Lula Webb, 
Woodlawn, Va. 



EXPERIENCE OF SISTER 
GOODWIN. 

Dear Mr. Gold : 

I feel like I want to write a few 
lines for the Landmark. I have been 
reading it for 50 years. I have 
never written anything for it and I 
feel this lonely Sabbath morning 



like I want to write some and tell 
what I hope the Lord has done for 
poor me. I can't tell how long it 
has been, but somewhere between 
45 or 50 years ago I was burdened 
with my sins. I could not rest. I 
had a dream. I thought I was out 
in the yard and all at once two 
large fires sprung up by me and the 
flames went higher than my head 
and it went out and left a bed of 
coals and I thought the Lord came 
and put His hands on my shoulders 
and said, "Look," and He pointed 
towards the west and I saw the 
prettiest tree I ever saw in my life 
and He said, "it is the tree of life." 
I awoke, and it is just as fresh in my 
mind today as when I saw it. I 
was burdened all day. I went to 
the supper table and sat down but 
could not eat. I got up and went in 
the woods and got in a bunch of 
bushes where I thought no one 
could see me. I fell on my knees 
and tried to pray. I got up and 
went to the house, feeling no bet- 
ter. That night I went to bed bur- 
dened so bad I could not go to sleep. 
A voice spoke and said, "Arise, 
many daughters have done virtu- 
ously, but thou dost excel them 
all." I felt so good I wanted to 
get up and tell mother, but did not 
then. It came to me that I wanted 
a home with the Old Baptists. I al- 
ways thought I loved them. They 
all looked so good to me. 

Saturday, before the third Sun- 
day in July, 1884, my mother join- 
ed. I thought I could not stand for 
her to go in the water and not go 
with her. I joined Sunday morn- 
ing at the water and was baptised 
by our pastor, John R. Rowe. All 
the next day these words rang in 
my mind, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



77 



"With thoughts of Christ and things 
divine, 

Fill up this foolish heart of mine." 

If you see fit to print this, correct 
all mistakes. I am a poor speller, 
and a bad writer. 

I want to live and die with the 
old Baptists. They can live with- 
out me, but I don't feel like I can 
live without them. I have not got 
much longer to stay here. I am in 
my seventy fifth year. - 1 am saved 
by grace if saved at all. 

From a sister in Christ, I hope, 
Martha R. Goodwin 
Lowland, N. C. 



A FINE EXPRESSION OF LOVE 
AND SYMPATHY. 

Mr. E. A. Standfield, 

Farmville, N. C. 
Dear Bro.: 

I have just read in the paper that 
your daughter has recently died, 
and I have no words to express my 
sorrow for you in your advanced 
age and physical infirmities. 

I still have a picture of her in my 
mind, noble, handsome, sweet, 
cheerful, composed and promising. 
I have lost many of our children, 
but none of them were grown, and 
my heart goes out in deep sympathy 
for others who have lost their pre- 
cious children, but let's not say they 
are lost; for while their inanimate 
bodies lie before us and we take a 
last glimpse at their mortal remains, 
we 'should not forget that the dead 
man lies before us but the living 
man has gone to God. Christianity 
came from the tomb. Jesus rose 
triumphant over all things that tend 
to keep our bodies in the tomb. I 
wish I could tell you how the Lord 
impressed a sweet promise from the 
prophecy of Isaiah : "Thy dead men 



shall live, together with my dead 
body shall they rise." "And if we 
believe Jesus died and rose again, 
so they that sleep in Him will God 
bring with Him." Jesus says, "I 
am the light of the world, he that 
believeth in me shall not walk in 
darkness, but shall have the light 
of life. And again "he that believ- 
eth in me shall never die." 

Dear brother, may the God of all 
grace comfort, keep, strengthen 
and reconcile you to every dispensa- 
tion of His providence, enabling you 
to say "The Lord has given, the 
Lord has taken away, blessed be 
the name of the Lord," also to say 
with Paul that "I am exceedingly 
joyful in all my tribulations." 

May God sustain you is the pray- 
er of one who still holds you in 
sweet remembrance, and loves you 
as a precious brother in Christ. 

Remember me in your prayers. 

B. S. COWIN. 



ENJOYS THE LANDMARK 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

Please find enclosed check for 
$2.00 which pays for the Landmark 
another year which will end April, 
1930. For if I am not deceived, I 
love the doctrine it contains. I en- 
joy reading the good writings of the 
brethren. Although we may be 
strangers in the flesh, I feel we 
have relationship in the spirit, for 
their experiences and feelings seem 
to be mine. I believe salvation is 
of the Lord, not of man nor by man, 
for by Grace are ye saved, through 
faith and that not of yourself. It is 
the gift of God. If I am not de- 
ceived this is the doctrine I believe 
in. 

J. F. Hamlett, 
Charlotte, Court House, Va. 
Route 2, Box 89. 



78 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ONE OF THE BEST EVER READ. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Wilson, N. C. 

I hastily run over the Landmark 
for Dec. 15, and except my letter it 
is one of the best numbers I ever 
read. Elder M. L. Gilbert knew 
what no man can know only by ex- 
perience. 

For days I have thought upon the 
short text to be found in John 
21:12. 

"Come and dine." 

And it is the experience I have 
had that causes me to appreciate 
this more than I would, for owing 
to the long affliction of my wife; 
I don't often hear this "Come and 
dine," as many hear it. I have 
thought that this is one of the great- 
est blessings of times to be called to 
partake of that meal prepared by 
another. When the Saviour com- 
manded these fishermen to "Come 
and dine," there is no doubt but 
what they obeyed His voice for 
they were His sheep. He did not 
provide the great variety many do 
now, but bread and fish was whole- 
some, and then the one who had 
prepared it was tlie loving Saviour, 
and it is truly contained in the scrip- 
ture that "better is a dinner of 
herbs, where love is, than a stalled 
ox with hatred." 

"Again it is written — "Eat what 
is set before you; asking no ques- 
tions for conscience sake." Since 
it has suited our children to go from 
home, and my wife's affliction has 
continued, many times I prepare 
that which we call refreshment, and 
though I am submissive to this, our 
fate, yet I sometimes tire, and think 
it hard that I can't sit still in the 
house like thousands of others and 
listen for the bell to call me; to, 
"Come and dine." I remember 



now that the Saviour asked the 
question, "Which is the greatest, he 
that sitteth at meat, or he that serv- 
eth but behold I am among you as 
he that serveth." 

This was the third time Jesus had 
spoken Himself to these disciples, 
after he was risen from the dead, 
and it is so plain He did not call any 
of the world to "Come and dine." 

"Eat O My friend, the Saviour cried, 
The feast was made for you. 
For you I groaned, and bled, and 
died. 

And rose and triumphed too." 

Elder Gilbert well says — "Condi- 
tions change, but principles never," 
and it is the great change in condi- 
tions that I write of, and now the 
children are away, and wife and 
myself are lone, and she is still held 
in the same state of afflictions she 
has been in for more than fifty 
years. I have eaten at as many 
homes as any man, I have slept on 
as many beds as any one, but condi- 
tions are such now that I must give 
up and can't go as I once did and 
hear the good mothers, or good ser- 
vants, or lords say — "Come, for all 
things are now ready." 

J. T. SATTERWHITE. 
LaFayette, Ala. 



BEEN TAKING THE LANDMARK 
SIXTY THREE YEARS 

Elder N. H. Harrison informs us 
that he has been taking the Land- 
mark since the beginning of its pub- 
lication, November the 15th, 1867. 
He is again renewing for the paper. 

Elder Harrison has been preach- 
ing for more than fifty years and 
is still vigorous, while his mind is 
alert, and his enunciations as clear 
and distinct as they were when he 
was a much younger man. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



79 



Zion^s Landmark 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, WiriSton-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
Elder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 

Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. No. 5 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C, JAN. 15, 1931 



BAPTIZED FOR THE DEAD. 

"Else what shall they do which 
are baptized for the dead, if the 
dead rise not at all ? Why are they 
then baptized for the dead." — 1 
Cor. 15:29. 

A number of times have I been 
asked to give my understanding of 
it. While in N. C. some weeks ago 
a brother asked me to give my views 
through Zion's Landmark. While 
its wording is vague and its mean- 
ing has never been clear to me, I 
will say a few things respecting it. 
It seems evident that some of the 
Corinthian disciples had been bap- 
tized for some who were dead, hav- 
ing never been baptized. Being 
taught that baptism was a figure of 
death and resurrection, some pos- 
sibly entertained the theory that 
"baptism for the dead," should be 



administered or the doctrine of the 
resurrection would have no signifi- 
cance. Paul did not commend or 
condemn this practice, but shows 
conclusively that he did not sanc- 
tion such practice by his question, 
"What shall they do which are bap- 
tized for the dead?" By the pro- 
noun "they" he indicates a separa- 
tion from his teaching by such prac- 
tice. Neither is there a warrant in 
any scripture for the custom. Other 
heretical practices arose or crept in- 
to the church at Corinth in the days 
of the Apostles. Then why be sur- 
prised when false theories are pro- 
mulgated in our ranks today? Be 
assured that every false teacher and 
false doctrine shall be rooted out of 
the church. No baptism with water 
or in tribulation, literally or meta- 
phorically, can be of any virtue to 
the dead; for they know nothing. 
Neither can such practice create 
and regenerate one, or put away the 
filth of the flesh; but these acts 
will be an answer of a good con- 
science to the subject of the ordi- 
nance, or ordeal, as every believer 
in Christ will testify. No unbap- 
tized persons, dead and in their 
graves, can derive any life, salva- 
tion or resurrection from the act of 
a believer, neither can his work be 
reputed or imputed to them. But 
as the Son of God died for your sins 
and arose from the dead for your 
justification, dear believer, "God 
now accepts thy works," — works of 
repentance, works of love, works 
of faith done by virtue of His grace 
and power; and by these fruits of 
the Spirit he lives joyfully and care- 
fully upon the gracious provisions 
God has provided for him today, to- 
morrow and forever. 

M. L. GILBERT. 



80 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

It is with an unworthy feeling that I at- 
tempt to write of the deatli of Sister Mol- 
lie Davis, who was born October 27, 1863 
and died September 11, 1930, making her 
stay on earth 66 years, 10 months and 14 
days. She was married to Brother Devers 
Davis, November 27, 1892 and to this un- 
ion was born three sons and one daughter. 
She was a dutiful wife and a loving mo- 
ther, always willing to lend a helping 
hand whenever needed. 

Sister Davis delighted in discussing her 
hope in Christ and in a godly conversa- 
tion about the goodness and mercy of the 
Lord. She was truly a mother in Israel, 
with an orderly walk and a dear sister in 
the Lord to the writer of this sketch. 

Sister Davis united with the Primitive 
Baptist Church at Flat River, Roxboro, N. 
C, on Saturday before the fourth Sunday 
in April 190 2, and was baptized by the 
pastor. Elder David R. Moore. She re- 
mained a devoted and consistent member 
until death. We feel that our loss is her 
eternal gain; therefore we humbly bow to 
the will of the Lord. 

She leaves a husband, four children and 
two brothers and a host of friends and 
relatives to mourn her passing. May the 
Lord reconcile the bereaved family to His 
will, is the wish of the writer, humbly sub- 
mitted. 

Done by order of the Church in Confer- 
ence at the November meeting, 1930. 

Elder A. L. Holloway, Moderator 
W. R. Blalock, Church Clerk. 



MRS. FANNIE FRANCES JACKSON 

Mrs. Fannie Frances Jackson, wife of 
A. R. Jackson, was born April 6, 1860, 
and died November 11, 1930. Before she 
was married she was Fannie Frances Tur- 
ner of Rocky Mount, Nash County, the 
daughter of Henry Turner and Romandy 
Turner. She was married to A. R. Jack- 
son, July 28, 1881. To this union were 
born six children, 3 boys and 3 girls, one 
boy and one girl died in infancy. The old- 
est son died at the age of 25 years. She 
leaves behind to mourn her loss a heart 
broken husband, one son and two daugh- 
ters, R. J. Jackson, Mrs. J. J. Joyner, 
Mrs. P. J. Turner, seventeen grandichldren 
and one great grandchild, five brothers 
and two sisters, to mourn the loss of a 
good woman. 

She united with the church at Pleasant 
Hill, Edgecombe County, Saturday before 
the fourth Sunday in May, 189 7, and was 
baptized Sunday by Elder W. H. Fly. She 
remained a member there as long as she 



to go to preaching every time there was a 
meeting there, and if she did not go was 
always talking about it. She took her 
b(d Dec. 29, 19 29; with that dreadful dis- 
ease, bowel consumption. The doctors 
and all the family did all they could, but 
none could stay the hand of death. The 
Lord loved her and took her home to rest. 
We believe she is asleep in Jesus. Her 
age was 70 years and 6 months. 

We loved her, yes we loved her, 
But the angels loved her best, 
And they have sweetly called her, 
To yonder shining shore to be at rest. 

You are gone but not forgotten, 
Nor shall you ever be, 
As long as life and memory last, 
We shall always remember thee. 

She was a smart woman, to help work 
and raise her family and would always 
lielp night or day when they were sick. 

All our days are dark and dreary 
Lonely are our hearts today. 
For the one we loved so dearly. 
Has forever passed away. 

May her husband and children and 
grandchildren lead the life she led, and 
meet her in the world to come, where 
there will be no sorrow, sickness, pain 
or death, all to be as one in Christ. 

Written at the request of her husband, 
by her loving grand daughter, 

MRS. EFFIE RILEY. 



MRS. B. C, CRAWFORD, 

Again the angel of death has visited our 
home and taken from our midst our dear 
mother, age 70 years. The final sum- 
mons came on the 28th of April nine-thirty 
p. m. Heart failure was her trouble. She 
professed a hope in Christ many years 
ago. She has told us many times that 
her peace was made with God, and she 
was ready and only waiting for Him to 
fall her home to rest. She was a kind 
mother and industrious woman. At all 
(imes ready to plead the cause of the 
poor and needy. We could not wish her 
back in a sin tried world. But we can say 
sleep on, mother. And ask an interest in 
l)rayers of the people of God that some 
sweet day we may meet her in the blessed 
forevermore. 

We would now thank our many friends 
for their kindness bestowed on us in those 
hours of trouble. And may God's bless- 
ings rest upon them. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

^^^^^^^^^^ AT ^^^^^^^^^^ 

WILSON. NORTH C ^ ^LINA 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOc ^' :^APTIST 

VOL. LXIV. FEBRUARY 1, 1931 S No. 6 



GOD PILLS THE COUNTRY WITH WATER. 

"And it came to pass in the morning, when the meat offering was offer- 
ed, that behold there came water by the way of Edom, and the country 
was filled with water. 

And when all the Moabites heard that the kings were come up to fight 
against them, they gathered all that were able to put on armor, and up- 
ward and stood in the border. 

And they arose early in the morning, and the sun shone on the water, 
and the Moabites saw the water on the other side as red as blood: 

And they said this is blood: the kings are surely slain, and they have 
smitten one another: now therefore Moab to the spoil. 

And when they came to the camp of Israel, the Israelites rose up and 
smote the Moabites, even in their country. 

And when the King of Moab saw that the battle was too sore for him, he 
took his eldest son that should have reigned in his stead and offered him 
for a burnt offering upon the wall. — 2 Kings, 3:20-27. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



©evoteJ) to the clause of ^esus Cbdst 



CHRIST IS THE WAY. 

Dear ReaJers of Zion's Landmark 
and all lovers of the Truth : 

For some cause it has been my 
mind to write some for the paper 
for quite a while, but feeling my lit- 
tleness and unworthiness I have re- 
frained from doing so until now. As 
I make this attempt I still feel unfit, 
but I come, I hope, trusting in the 
Lord who is His people's fitness and 
their hope. 

Jesus has said, "I am the Way, 
the Truth and the Life" and I de- 
sire to write something concerning 
this great and wonderful Way, if it 
be the Lord's will, and I feel that if 
one is blest to write or to speak 
about this "Way," the Way must be 
in him or her, and him or her must 
be in the "Way," that is Jesus in us 
and us in Jesus. 

Now we are poor helpless beings, 
and that being the case, we cannot 
get in the "Way," but God who is 
rich in mercy, and having all power 
both in Heaven and Earth, was, and 
is able to place us in the"Way," and 
this was His will and purpose even 
before the world was. We feel in 
the great fall of Adam and it was by 
that transgression that we became 
sinners. Then for this cause God 
sent the "Way," that we through 
and by the "Way might be redeem- 
ed from all sin, and not a part of it. 

This mighty "Way" came in the 
likeness of sinful flesh, being born 
of the virgin Mary as God said 
through the mouth of the prophet: 



"Behold, a virgin shall be with 
child, and shall bring forth a Son 
and they shall call His name Em- 
manuel, which being interpreted is, 
God with us." Matt. 1 :23. The 
"Way" was with God the Father 
even before Adam was, but never 
(iid make His advent in the world 
until hundreds of years afterward. 
The "Way" came in to this world 
at God's time — the proper time, be- 
cause this was God's "Way". It 
was His only begotten Son, the 
ONLY Saviour of sinners. 

He says that He is the "Way," 
and then He says, "I am the Door." 
He is the "Way" — the Door to the 
sheep fold — the Church. Now 
since He is the "Way" and the 
"Door," He is the "Head and the 
church is the body. Therefore He 
loved the body (the church) be- 
cause it is His Bride, the Lamb's 
Wife. 

O, how wonderful it is that this 
"Way" is the Church and the 
Church is in the "Way". God, in 
His infinite wisdom fixed this mat- 
ter, and He fixed it right. He has 
given unto them eternal life and 
says "They shall never perish." 
They cannot perish, because they, 
the (Church) is His body and He is 
the "Head". The "Head" cannot 
be separated from the "Body" lest 
the body die and the "Head" also. 
And He has said: "I am He that liv- 
eth, and was dead, behold I am 
alive forever more." I do love to 
think of this wonderful entangle- 



82 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ment, "I in you and you in Me, and 
I in the Father." This is the pre- 
destination of God and the will of 
Him. Paul says: "Having predesti- 
nated us (the church) unto the 
adoption of children by Jesus Christ 
(the Way) to Himself (God) ac- 
cording to the pleasure of His will, 
to the praise of the glory of His 
grace, wherein He hath made us ac- 
cepted in the beloved." Eph. 1 :5, 6. 

I was told by a lady once that she 
did not believe in predestination 
and said it was indeed a dangerous 
doctrine. I feel like she told 
me the truth, in part, and the reason 
she did not believe in the eternal 
fixing of God, was because she 
knew nothing about God in the 
pardoning of her sins. "The wis- 
dom of the world is foolishness with 
God, not subject to His laws; nei- 
ther indeed can be." And this being 
the case the doctrine of salvation by 
grace though the predetermined 
will of God is foolishness to the 
world. They cannot see it, because 
their eyes have never been opened. 
There is a class of people that have 
eyes and see not, ears and hear not 
and hearts that do not understand, 
and it does take the righteous law 
of God to show them that they are 
poor lost sinners without God or 
hope in the world. This, the holy 
law of God is the lesser light, but is 
the shadow of good things to come 
It is the shadovs^ of the wonderful 
subject that is under consideration, 
"The Way, the Truth and the 
Life." This great law, the lesser 
light shows us what we are, and 
and hence we become sick. Then 
"they that are whole need not a 
physician, but the sick." When 
this law of God shines forth in a 
poor sinner's heart, he or she be- 
comes a beggar — a mourner, poor 



and needy. Then, "Blessed are they 
that mourn, for they SHALL be 
comforted." Matt. 5:4. "When the 
POOR and NEEDY seek water and 
there is none, and their tongue fail- 
eth for thirst; I, the Lord WILL 
hear them: I, the God of Israel will 
not forsake them." Isa. 41 :17. They 
beg Gcd for His mercy, because 
they are taught that in Him all full- 
ness dwells, and that He, and He 
alone is able to reach such a vile 
sinner. It is then that they are 
taught that Jesus is the "Way," and 
they do seek Him, and they do find 
Him. "Seek and ye shall find, 
knock and it shall be opened unto 
you." The world thinks this ap- 
plied to every member of Adam's 
race, but No! It ONLY applies to 
the sick, the one that thirsts and the 
poor mourner, and they are the chil- 
dren of God. It is such individuals 
that were embraced in the cove- 
nant of grace, and that covenant is 
the will of God, and to me that Will 
was the "Way," to-wit Jesus. 

Brethren, now let our writing and 
preaching be concerning the things 
that we have seen and handled with 
our hands, for our "me thinks" and 
"I reckons" may not be in line with 
the Way" and thus cause confus- 
ion. Let us strive for the things 
that make peace, and not be back- 
biting nor criticising one another 
for this is not faithfulness! But 
"Faithfulness becometh the house 
of the Lord." May the God of all 
grace bless us all and give us un- 
derstanding, and may we leave the 
things that we do not understand 
ALONE. It is not what we under- 
stand that causes confusion, but 
that which we do not. 

May God's richest blessings rest 
and abide with us all, both now and 
forever. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



A poor sinner saved by grace, if 
saved at all, 

Frederick W. Rhodes, 
102 Youngs Ave., 
Durham, N. C. 



DUTY. 

Elder S. B. Denny, 

Dear Brother in hope of Heaven: 

From some cause I cannot tell 
why, for sometime I have felt im- 
pressed to v^^rite some on the sub- 
ject of duty. While I feel that I 
cannot do justice to the subject, but 
merely to relieve my mind, and per- 
form a duty which I sometimes feel 
is mine, for if my impressions to 
write for publication are of the 
Lord, I know it is my duty, though 
my effort be ever so weak. Once 
while meditating over the thought, 
I was trying to decide whether it 
was all imagination with me, but 
sighed deep down in my heart. 

Oh! if I could write like others, I 
know I would love to write all the 
lime. Something like a voice spoke 
to me. "You should not covet the 
gift of others, but should make 
usury of the one meted out to you." 
This dear brother made me more 
vviliing to make an effort when a 
subject bears on my mind. I have 
rebelled from time to time until I 
have felt that my heart would burst 
if I did not tell some one my feel- 
ings. But seeing and feeling my 
own weakness and imperfections so 
vivid and hoping some one else who 
was more able to treat the subject 
than myself might write. 

Though ,1 have learned that no 
one else can perform my duty, 
though they do greater justice to 
the subject than I. They are mere- 
ly using their own gift, not mine. 
But, however, whether the impres- 
sion of my mind is of the Lord I can 



not tell, but I trust in Him to guide 
my mind, for if He does not I know 
I shall make an utter failure. I 
have made several efforts prior to 
this, to write on this subject, but 
cast it aside and said within myself, 
if I would do my duty as I should, I 
wouldn't have any time or cause for 
lebuking my brethren. However, 
the impression does not depart. The 
question often arises in my mind, 
what is my duty? What is church 
duty collectively and individually? 
Surely every member of God's king- 
dom has a duty. God has a pur- 
pose in laying every stone in build- 
ing this great temple or kingdom. 
He fits every one in its proper place 
and at His own good time. In every 
one He places a gift. To some one, 
and to some two, and to some even 
five. Now, is it not the duty of 
every one from the smallest to the 
greatest to make usury of their gift, 
that the gift may increase? 

Some one may say. How am I to 
do this, seeing that I have but one 
talent? I am poor and weak in the 
spirit, and am poor in this world's 
goods. I would say to you dear 
ones, so long as we look at it that 
way, we are burying our talent and 
therefore making ourselves weaker 
stones. 

If we should be numbered with 
God's children, He has a use for us 
in His kingdom, and our reward is 
as great as those who have five 
talents. I feel to know that I am 
the very least, if one at all. But 
we must not wither away and die 
because of this scorching heat. If 
God has seen fit to pluck us out of a 
barren wilderness and planted us in 
His kingdom. 

We should read His holy word, 
and learn what our duty is and 
pray without ceasing, that He may 



84 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



guide and direct us in our duty. We 
are commanded to search the scrip- 
tures for in them ye think ye have 
eternal life. Eternal life is not 
gained by reading scriptures, but 
the way of life is taught in them 
and aided by their teachings we 
may grow in the knowledge of the 
truth. I feel that it is the duty of 
the church to watch over one an- 
other for good, not for evil. I see 
so much coldness in Zion at this 
present time that I feel distressed 
and mourn on account of it. What is 
the cause? Have we, as church 
members failed in our duty. Many 
of the dear children of God have 
been bewildered and tossed about 
by different winds of doctrme. 
Though thanks be to God, and let 
His name ever be praised, there are 
still a few landmarks who, though 
meek as lambs, yet bold as lions, 
that are holding up the blood-stain- 
ed banner and are trying to wave 
the banner of peace among the in- 
habitants of Zion. There will still 
be some to bear the staff as long as 
time shall last, for God has prom- 
ised not to leave Himself without a 
witness. 

I would greatly appreciate a 
word from any that have a mind to 
write me. 

Oh, may the dear Lord, v/ho call- 
ed us by His grace, keep us hum- 
ble, obedient, ever abounding in the 
work whereunto He has called us, 
is my humble prayer. 

In hope, 
Mrs. Elgie Lee WilHams, 
Route No. 1, Garner, N. C. 



JESUS THE WAY, THE TRUTH 
AND THE LIGHT. 

Jesus gave his theory of life to 
the small group of plain people who 
. his Father gave him. They were 



the ones that could listen, and gave 
much time to explaining to them 
what this meant in practical life. 
We avoided all theological and phil- 
osophical discussion and adapted 
his teaching to the capacities of 
those who would learn. His speech 
were expressions of the life thai 
they understood, and his language 
Avas simple and direct. He made it 
plain to the small group of his fol- 
lowers that they were to go out and 
preach his gospel. They were to 
preach the new kingdom and lead 
men to become citizens of this new 
•kingdom. No doubt they thought 
it was a great undertaking, a great 
responsibility laid on the shoulders 
of this small group of unlettered 
men. How shall we proceed was 
doubtless the question in every 
heart, on what shall we rely for 
success? Jesus did not leave them 
in the dark on this point. He made 
it clear to them that his kingdom 
was not to be established by force. 
This kingdom was to be different 
from all the kingdoms that had 
gone before. There is nothing in 
the teaching of Jesus to indicate 
that he would approve of compul- 
sion in any form, only his loving 
kindness to draw men to him. He 
gave no recognition at all to com- 
pulsion as an efficient force in 
drawing men to spiritual ideals. In 
his dealing with individuals he al- 
ways showed the greatest respect 
for the individual's personality and 
freedom to go his own way and he 
never exercises any sort of compul- 
sion to draw men to him only with 
his love, and as he saw others de- 
serting him he turned to them as if 
to make it easier for them to go also 
if they so desired and said, "Will 
you go also," this was a hard les- 
son for them to learn. It has been 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



85 



a hard lesson for Christians to learn 
and practice in all ages. 

It has been hard for the different 
churches to accept this philosophy. 
From time to time the churches 
have tried to advance the cause of 
Christianity through compulsion, 
sometimes by physical force. All 
of these have failed and every case 
the church has lost ground through 
the use of such weapons, notwith- 
standing the plain teachings of 
Jesus and the failure that has fol- 
lowed every experiment with force 
and compulsion as spiritual wea- 
pons, there are still people who per- 
sist in these attempts to drive peo- 
ple into the kingdom of God. The 
temptation to resort to compulsion 
as a mean of advancing the king- 
dom is due to several causes. Per- 
haps it indicates a lack of faith in 
the power of spiritual conviction. It 
must come from a failure to appre- 
ciate the truth that every real 
change in a man's life must come 
from within and must be the result 
of God's choice, to wit: "You have 
not chosen me, but I have chosen 
you." The lack of faith in the 
power of spiritual forces on the 
part of the people who followed 
Jesus when he was in the world led 
Jesus to rebuke them. Again the 
average man wants to see quick re- 
sults from his efforts. He wants to 
see men change before his eyes. He 
has not the patience to wait on the 
slow process of spiritual evolution 
in the soul. He is not spiritual 
enough himself to appreciate the 
qualities of spiritual growth. 

Then, the average person seems 
to have instinctive mania to compel 
people to go his way. He prizes 
freedom for himself but he does not 
believe in it for others. He believes 
he knows that which is best for the 



other man and he is doing him a 
favor in making him do as he 
should. But this is not the teach- 
ing of Jesus. 

Submitted with love, 
Mrs. Nettie Ellis, 

132 Pollock St. 
New Bern, N. C. 



CHARGE GOOD AND TIMELY. 

Elder M. L. Gilbert. 

Dade City, Fla., 
Dear Brother Gilbert: 

I have just read with great inter- 
est your fatherly charge to the 
young preacher which is so good, 
sound and timely. All are so sub- 
ject to mistakes. We are poor, im- 
perfect beings and so much need 
the mercy of God continually and 
also the tender nursing of our good 
brethren. I talked to some able 
young preachers last fall and told 
them that I so much appreciated 
the gift in them, but not to be puff- 
ed up or think of themselves more 
highly than they ought to think. 

A preacher once said there are 
three phases in a preacher's life, 
1st., they idolize him; 2nd they crit- 
icize him; third, they scandalize 
him. I guess this is about true. 

We so much need our preachers. 
In some sections they are very 
scarce, but somehow I want to be- 
lieve that God will not leave him- 
self without true faithful witnesses. 
Surely the old church will remain 
on earth. They may decrease like 
the moon until almost gone out, but 
will revive and shine brilliantly 
again. Her light, like that of the 
moon, is not an original light, but a 
borrowed light. Her light is in the 
Lord. David said, "The Lord is my 
light and my salvation." It is good 
to feel the truthfulness of this. 



86 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



We are having good meetings. 
Our people are dwelling together in 
unity. We are to ordain three 
worthy men of God to the office of 
deacon next Sunday at my home 
church. I feel more hopeful for 
better days among our dear people 
most generally. I see more peace 
and fellowship abounding than for 
nearly forty years, in sections at 
least. I love peace. I appreciate 
it, but I fear that some of our good 
brethren in the west are a little over 
zealous and seem to want us to 
compromise with the progressives. 
There is no repentance among 
them in Georgia. They still have 
their organs, Sunday Schools, 
Ladies' Aid Societies, secret orders, 
etc. I do not know of any here 
that want any such compromise. 

About eighteen associations in 
Georgia are now in loving harmony, 
satisfied with the goodness of the 
Lord's house. 

The financial depression has been 
fearful here, but sometimes I can 
believe there will be meal in the 
barrel and that the righteous will 
not be forsaken, nor His seed beg- 
ging for bread. I spent much time 
of late in humble prayer to God for 
deliverance. No matter how dark 
the night, the sun is shining some- 
where. We shall see it again. 

We have had colds. I have suf- 
fered from heart failure. I trust 
you and yours are well. 

With kindest regards. 

Yours in love, 
Lee Hanks. 
1800 N. Decatur Rd. 
Atlanta, Ga. 



GOD RULES IN RIGHTEOUSNESS. 

Dearly beloved of the Lord of glory : 
It is by the imputed righteousness 
of Christ Jesus, the Lord, that we 



have been blessed to be partakers 
of the goodness and mercy of our 
God, the Lord of the whole earth 
who rules and reigns in righteous- 
ness to the pulling down of the 
strongholds of satan and to the up- 
building of His dear little ones in 
the faith of our Lord and Saviour, 
Jesus Christ, who doeth all things 
well for those who love Him, who 
are called according to His own pur- 
pose and grace given us in Christ 
Jesus before the world was and are 
being made manifest to his dear lit- 
tle ones as fast as time rolls on and 
will continue until the last one of 
His little ones are brought into the 
fold where there shall be one shep- 
herd and one fold, all to the glory 
of God and to the everlasting com- 
fort and consolation of His dear 
people who are in Christ Jesus, the 
Lord. 

Yours with an humble hope of 
everlasting life, 

J. R. JONES, 
Rockford, N. C, R. 1. 



SUBSCRIBER TO FIVE PRIMI- 
TIVE BAPTIST PAPERS. 

P. D. Gold Publishing Co. 
Dear Mr. Gold: 

I am a subscriber to 5 Primitive 
Baptist papers, including Zion's 
Landmark. It is in line with my 
other papers and in line with the 
teaching of Respass, Gold, Mitchell 
and too many others to mention, 
who in my childhood days as a Bap- 
tist I was permitted to know and 
hear teach in the name of Jesus. 

Of all the sinful mortals ever 
born on earth, I feel the most won- 
derfully blessed. My mother was 
baptized three months before I was 
born. She prayed earnestly to Al- 
mighty God for her unborn child. 
My father was a deacon and loved 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



87 



his Jesus. I am 78 years old, have 
lived with the Baptists 58 years, but 
I am not a Baptist on account of my 
association with them. By the 
grace of God I am what I am. 

As brother Ambrose says he does 
not believe what the preacher did 
who said, "That all were saved be- 
fore Adam was formed of the dust." 
I believe they were saved before the 
dust was even made. In the mind 
of God they were saved before the 
dust was formed. God is omnipo- 
tent, omnipresent. He saw the 
end with the beginning. He is not 
the author of sin, neither can he 
commit sin. 

I liked Joshua T. Rowe's letter 
until he gets near the bottom of the 
first page. He says, "That man 
being a creature of dust, lustful and 
weak." My understanding is con- 
trary to his. Man being created or 
being a creature made of dust did 
not make him lustful or weak. He 
was good and very good. He was 
not lustful until he violated God's 
holy and righteous law. He vio- 
lated God's law knowingly and be- 
came a sinner and lust was the re- 
sult of sin. There were no children 
born until after his violation, and 
Eve associated with Adam naked 
before they sinned. 

Jesus said, "My peace I give un- 
to thee." Now, if we spend our 
lives in fear and trembling that we 
will be forever banished from the 
presence of God, where is our 
peace? 

Jesus says, "You must be born 
again." I know I was conceived in 
my mother's womb, afterwards I 
I was born naturally. I have no re- 
membrance or knowledge of these 

i things but spiritually I do remem- 
ber the day I was conceived, be- 
gotten, and of all days of my life, 



the day I was born spiritually, do I 
remember. My burden of condem- 
nation was taken away. A new 
song was put in my mouth, even 
praises to God and to the Lamb. 
Until I was born I saw no light, but 
when I was born I saw light. I saw 
how poor, vile wretched sinners 
could be saved. Jesus, Jesus, He 
died in our stead and just as sure 
as He died, that sure we will live 
with him in Heaven. Do I live to- 
day because I was born 58 years 
ago? No. I live on the gospel tes- 
timony of the Lord Jesus, his dis- 
ciples, and his teachers of today. 

On one occasion I heard M. F. 
Gilbert and E. J. Devane preach 
and positively I ate so much I did 
not think I would ever want another 
morsel the remainder of my life. 

W. F. BRITT, 

Arcadia, Fla. 



READING IT SINCE FATHER 
WAS EDITOR. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co., 
Wilson, N. C., 

Enclosed you will find check for 
two dollars ($2.00) to pay for the 
Landmark from Jan. 1931 to Jan. 
1932. I've been reading it ever 
since your father became editor of 
the Landmark. 

I remember seeing your father ; 
baptized when he came to the 
Primitives. He and Sister Peters i 
and her mother were baptized at ' 
the same time. | 

He preached in Kehukee Church I 
the same day. I don't remember 
the date but was in the early seven- ^ 
ties. ; 

My husband, W. R. House, took 
the Landmark for thirty years or , 
more. i 

Th good Lord saw fit to call him I 
home the 13th of last February. 



88 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



We took the Landmark so long I 
would like to contiue the paper as I 
like so much to rad it, if it continues 
in love and peace and the true doc- 
trine as I see it. Salvation by 
grace and grace alone. 

Wishing the Lord may bless you 
and yours, 

Mrs. Lydia A. House, 
The address was W. R. House, 
Box 360, Scotland Neck, N. C. 
And now the new address is, 
Mrs. Lydia A. House, 
502 South Main St., 
Scotland Neck, N. C. 



PAYING FOR LANDMARK 
50 YEARS. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C, 
Dear Friend : 

You will find inclosed one dollar 
to pay on my subscription to the 
Landmark. You can give me 
credit for that as far as it will go 
and if I don't send more then you 
can stop the paper. I hate to do 
this. I would love to send the 
whole amount but I am not able to 
work as I am now in my 73rd year. 

I have been reading the Land- 
mark ever since I could read and 
have been taking and paying for it 
about 50 years, but I am not now 
able to do as I have done. I have 
no one to call on now. I should 
have paid you October 1st but was 
not able. 

Your friend, 

Mrs. R. E. Adams. 

Selma, N. C. 



NEED HELP TO REPAIR 
CHURCH. 

To the Zion's Landmark: 

The Primitive Baptist church at 
Norfolk, Va., resolved at its Decem- 
ber quarterly meeting to ask the 



more fortunate churches and friends 
for help to repair our church house, 
which is in great need. Being few 
in number and not financially able 
to make the repairs which will re- 
quire three or four hundred dol- 
lars, every one that has the means 
and spirit will please send to the 
clerk and we will be very grateful. 

May the Lord be very gracious to 
you all. 

Mrs. Bertha Jorden (Clerk) 
221 W. 29 St., Norfolk, Va. 
Mrs. A. P. Lindsey Asst. Clerk, 
1410 W. 48 St., Norfolk, Va. 



REGRET THE OMISSION. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

I have just received the Jan. 15 
number of the Landmark and notice 
my article of a trip among certain 
churches of Eastern, N. C, and find 
that on page 71 in the first column, 
between the name, "J. W. Daniels" 
and the closing word "Sunday," of 
that sentence, a large portion of my 
letter, giving an account of other 
meetings, including the church at 
Hunting Quarters, with some re- 
marks concerning its pastor and the 
late Elder L. H. Hardy, have all 
been omitted, which makes my let- 
ter appear very erroneous to those 
who know the facts. For fear some 
might think I had purposely mis- 
stated things, I desire this notice to 
appear in the Landmark that all 
may understand. 

I am as ever yours, 

J. P. TINGLE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 



We regret the omission which evi- 
dently was made by the printer in 
making up the forms. None of the 
copy was stricken out by any one 
connected with the office. 

J. D. GOLD. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



89 



Zion^s Landmark 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Llder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 
Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. No. 6 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C, FEB. 1, 1931 



THE LAW OF THE LORD IS 
PERFECT. 

As we contrast the laws of man, 
with our limited conception of the 
perfect law of the Lord, we say of a 
truth. Thy ways, oh Lord are equal, 
just, holy, true and righteous, but as 
for man, his ways are unequal and 
fail in all respects to measure up 
with the standard of truth, and 
holiness of the Lord. 

The laws of men, may restrain, 
and punish; but they do not change 
the heart or renew the will. 

The law of God, which came by 
Moses, condemns the guilty, and 
justly so; but the Law of the Lord 
which came by Jesus Christ, truly 
sets the guill^ free and keeps him 
unto the final day. Though a par- 
doned sinner may feel to be justly 
cast down, he is never destroyed. 

The law of the Lord is just in all 
of its findings, judgments, and 



ministrations. David said the 
"Judgments of the Lord are true 
and righteous, altogether." 

Man, and man made laws, and 
Courts often fall short of finding 
true facts or in meeting out Justice. 
Sometimes men suffer wrongfully 
and at other times the guilty are 
not brought to judgment and there- 
fore escape their just punishment. 

The Judgments of God are to the 
line, not short of justice nor do they 
overstep the line of right and true 
justice. All having sinned and 
having fallen under the curse of 
the broken law of God, are justly 
condemned and none can escape 
the search warrant that will bring 
them to the Judgment Bar of God. 
When they are brought before God, 
in their feelings they all confess 
that they are guilty and justly con- 
demned. 

We read. "That God loves the 
broken and contrite spirit and He 
turneth not the needy empty hand- 
ed away." 

The Judgments of God are not 
only to the line and just; but His 
righteousness, is to the plummet, or 
in other words, the righteous sacri- 
fice for sin, made by the sacrifice of 
the sinless blood of Jesus meets ev- 
ery demand of the law of God. 

I'he law of God, serves as a 
Schoolmaster, to bring us to Christ, 
but not into Christ. Just where the 
law of Moses ceases to lead, the law 
of Christ leads through Jordan into 
the land of promise. 

We should be charitable one to- 
ward another, seeing that all are 
imperfect and that God has been 
merciful unto us. If we obtain 
mercy, should we not be charitable 
toward all. 

In hope, 

O. J. DENNY, 



90 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



COMPROMISES. 

Of late there have been a number 
of entreaties by Banner-Herald ad- 
herents, a paper published by the 
Progressive Baptists, and here and 
there, some Primitive Baptists are 
crying for a peace meeting, to be 
staged for a get-together of the 
churches of the Primitive Baptists 
with the Progressive Baptists. 

Such a meeting can never make 
peace, for no compromises can be 
effected, and they who advocate 
such means have more zeal for 
numbers than they have for unity 
and strength. These tell us we are 
all agreed upon the essentials, the 
fundamental principles of the doc- 
trine; and as the church is a sov- 
ereign, we should agree to aWow 
each church to manage her own 
affairs and internal matters. But 
no church that continually departs 
from the order of the Apostolic 
church, either in doctrine or prac- 
tice, can maintain her identity as 
the church of God. How inconsis- 
tent with true faith would it be to 
bring into the house of God worldly 
aids, societies and institutions of 
men. 

About the year 1792 some un- 
scriptural things began to be in- 
troduced into the Apostolic church, 
and for a number of years new 
things crept into her ranks, and 
the innovators gradually grew in 
number. But in 1832 the loyal 
members declared non-fellowship 
for all the new things, which had 
been brought into the church and 
expunged from her ranks all that 
would not give them up. At that 
time that element of the Baptist 
that was cut off, that is now known 
as new-school or Missionary Bap- 
tist, were in manner sound in doc- 
trine. But after long conformity to 



the institutions of the world and 
the doctrines and commandments 
of men becoming so full of Armin- 
ian doctrines as to lose all identity 
of the church. It is evident that if 
the church had compromised in- 
stead of withdrawing from them at 
that time she could have no more 
proved her identity with Apostolic 
church than could the popular de- 
nominations of this day. 

While the Progressive Baptists 
have not functioned as long, since 
they w'ere expelled from the church 
as the new-school Baptists, and to 
their credit, it can be said that 
many of them are sounder in doc- 
trine than some Primitive Baptists; 
but they are nearly abreast v/ith 
other religious orders when it comes 
to aids, societies and worldly insti- 
tutions; as in their protracted meet- 
ings, the evangelist has his choral 
singing, the organ of Cathedral is 
heard, introduced into the Christian 
service by the Pope of Rome in 666; 
the humdrum of voices of the chil- 
dren recite their lessons in the Sun- 
day school, before preaching ser- 
vice, introduced not by Christ or an 
apostle but by Robert Rakis in 
1792; then follows their aid socie- 
ties, etc. The regular Primitive 
Baptists of the south are not dissat- 
isfiiid with the Old Landmarks, and 
are glad to hear a, "Thus saith the 
Lord, stand ye in the ways, and see, 
and ask for the old paths, where is 
the good way, and walk therein, 
iukI ye shall find rest for your souls. 
But they said, (the Progre.- sives now 
say) we will not walk therein." 

While this new order of Baptists 
had its birth in Georgia many years 
ago, it has not grown and spread 
abroad like many ^\'orldly institu- 
tions, because it i - l.;o s .rnJ, in doc- 
trine to be pleasing to the world. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



91 



Having so many good people among 
them it is the more strange that the 
Lord should let them remain so 
long as a cake unturned. 

Elder C. H. Cayce, editor of the 
Primitive Baptist, says, "The mat- 
ter of adjustment of the differences 
between the Old Liners and the Pro- 
gressives is something that more 
directly concerns the brethren 
vi'here they are troubled v^ith it 
than the brethren in other sections." 
As no repentance has been mani- 
fested by the Progressives for their 
innovations, and departures from 
Church order, surely the editor 
would not be willing for the church- 
es of the south to accept them, 
"warp and woof," when they have 
gone much further off than when 
the churches first rejected them. 

Elder Lee Hanks, says, I love 
peace, I appreciate it but I fear 
some of our good brethren in the 
west are a little over zealous and 
seem to want us to compromise with 
the Progressives, their organs, Sun- 
day Schools, woman's aid societies, 
secret orders, etc. I do not know 
of any here that want any such 
compromise. About eighteen asso- 
ciations in Georgia are now in lov- 
ing harmony; satisfied with the 
goodness of the Lord's house." 
What Eld. Hanks says of Georgia 
Baptists will voice the regular Prim- 
itive Baptists elsewhere. If those 
"peace lovers," want to "compro- 
mise" by a union with the progres- 
sives I am sure our people will let 
them alone, as they have the "Pro- 
gressive Baptists." 

M. L. GILBERT. 



THOUGHTS ON PORTIONS OF 
THE 5TH CHAPTER 1ST. 
PETER, 1ST VERSE. 

"The elders which are among 



you I exhort, who am also an elder, 
and a witness of the sufferings of 
Christ, and also a partaker of the 
glory that shall be revealed." 

"I understand that Peter is ad- 
dressing his brethren in the minis- 
try and he is talking to them out of 
his own experience as he is also an 
elder, and a witness of the suffer- 
ings of Christ. Peter was an eye 
witness of the actual sufferings of 
Christ, not only on the cross, but in 
all of his life, for he was a man of 
sorrows and acquainted with grief. 
His word was disputed. He was 
accused of blasphemy. His name 
was cast out as evil. His enemies 
said that the good He was doing 
was prompted by an evil spirit. That 
he cast out devils by the Prince of 
the Devils, and who could be a wit- 
ness to all this suffering by one 
whom he knew to be a good man 
and not be in sympathy with him. 
The Father of Jesus had revealed 
to Peter that he was the Son of God, 
and then he saw him suffer on the 
cross, the bodily pain it caused, and 
he heard him cry, "My God, my 
God, why hast thou forsaken me," 
and he understood that all this suf- 
fering was to redeem and save sin- 
ners from their sins. Is there not 
great reason why Peter should love 
and desire to honor him who wil- 
lingly took on himself such suffer- 
ing and shame, rather than that 
those he loved should suffer the 
punishment justly due their sin? 
So those who by faith are given to 
see Jesus and his sufferings for 
their sins love him and desire to 
serve him. The first thing Saul of 
Tarsus asked after Jesus was re- 
velaled to him, was "Lord what wilt 
thou have me to do?" Peter, Paul, 
and those of today who have had 
Jesus revealed to them not only wit- 



92 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ness his sufferings, but they also 
partake of the glory that shall be 
revealed. The apostles were 
blessed to see and hear the risen 
Jesus and also to see him go into 
heaven, and the same Lord now gra- 
ciously assures his loved ones as no 
other power can assure them that 
he is theirs, and they are his. 
Jesus while in the flesh ate natural 
food, and angels ministered unto 
him. And he said, "I have meat to 
eat that ye know not of." Now he 
satisfieth the desire of every living 
thing, his children are living crea- 
tures. "If any man be in Christ he 
is a new creature." And there is 
no food of a worldly nature that 
will satisfy this new creature and so 
he has given them the true bread 
from heaven, which is himself, and 
it pleases God by the foolishness of 
preaching to save them that believe. 

And hence Peter's admonition to 
the elders to feed the flock of God 
among them, but no man taketh this 
honor unto himself, neither can 
they confer it upon another. It is 
only those who are called of God, 
as was Aaron. Therefore brethren 
and churches should be very care- 
ful whom they license and ordain to 
the ministry. Those whom God 
has called will be an honor and a 
comfort to the church, but those 
called by men will be a failure and 
a disgrace to the blessed cause that 
we all love so much. The exhor- 
tation is feed the flock of God. No 
one can do this unless he has the 
food, and no one but God can give 
it to him. He is to feed, and take 
the oversight of the flock where he 
is, and not by constraint but willing- 
ly. No one having submitted to or- 
dination has the right to refuse to 
serve the brethren in whatever way 
they call upon him and not for 



filthy lucre but of a ready mind. 
The God that called him to feed his 
flock will put it in the hearts of 
those called to eat the gospel food 
to minister to him of their carnal 
things, and there will be mutual 
love and care for each other, and 
God will be praised. These elders 
are not to be lords over the church 
but ensamples to her, that is his 
manner of life is to be such as is 
worthy of imitation by those he 
lives among. It is not meet that 
they should serve tables, the gov- 
ernment of the church is in the 
church, and the distribution of the 
finances of the church should be by 
her deacons, and the preacher or 
pastor should give himself to the 
ministry of the word. 

Now to the church. 5th verse. 
"Likewise ye younger submit your- 
selves to the elder, the elder here 
means the older. It was the cus- 
tom in Israel when important mat- 
ters were to be decided to call the 
elders, that is the older ones who 
had experience in the affairs of the 
nation. How nice it is to see the 
youger in the church disposed to 
leave matters to the judgment of 
the older ones, but this is no reason 
why the older should not hear and 
fully weigh the thoughts of the 
younger. Yea, all of you be -sub- 
jected one to another, and be cloth- 
ed with humility. Clothing is put on 
the outside. Therefore let us so 
deport ourselves as to show the 
church that we do willingly submit 
to her judgment. When we come 
together to attend the business of 
the Lord's house, let each one old 
and young freely and fully in a bro- 
therly manner give their views of 
the subject before us, then put it to 
a vote and let the majority rule, and 
let each of the rest of us submit as 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



93 



cheerfully and brotherly as if it had 
gone our way. Of course this does 
not apply when and where the 
principles of the doctrine of Christ 
are at stake. In such cases those 
who hold the doctrine of the Bible 
are the chuixh, be they majority or 
minority. Since serving churches I 
have advised them always in ordi- 
nary affairs of the chui-ch to sub- 
mit to the majority. It is under- 
stood, among all Primitive Baptist 
churches so far as I know that in 
receiving members to fellowship, 
choosing a deacon or pastor, also in 
ordaining a brother to the ministry 
it should be only by the consent of 
all the members. Also I feel and 
have advised that when a church 
proposes to take up some new prac- 
tice, change or drop some old prac- 
tice it should be by unanimous 
vote. For instance, I was serving 
a church whose custom had been to 
commune once a month, and it was 
proposed to change to once in three 
months. All voted for the change 
except one sister. She wanted to 
continue the old custom. I advised 
that we not make the change. The 
church agreed, and we are all glad. 
After a time the sister was willing 
to make the change and so it was 
made and all was well. As each 
could see that all were clothed with 
humility and were not seeking their 
own but the peace and happiness of 
others. Do we love one another? 
Jesus said by this shall all men 
know that ye are my disciples if we 
have love one to another. Love is 
of God, and he that loveth not his 
"brother v/hom he hath seen, how 
can he love God whom he hath not 
seen. God resisteth the proud. Am 
I not proud when I will not submit 
to my brethren? But must have 
my own way even to the disturbing 



of the peace of the church. We 
are told to avoid them that cause 
divisions. So God resists them, but 
he giveth grace to the humble. They 
have charity toward their brethren 
and though they may feel that they 
have made a mistake, they believe 
them honest lovers of the Lord. 
Dear brethren these are perilous 
times. Let us love one another and 
labor together for the peace of our 
beloved Zion. Provoke one another 
to love and to good works, and I 
know of no way to do this, so well 
as for each of us to be found walk- 
ing in love and good works, con- 
tending earnestly, honestly, loving- 
ly and uncomplainingly for the 
faith which was once delivered to 
the saints. God will be praised 
and his church and his people bene- 
fited. 

Your brother in hope, 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



JAMES A. MANESS. 

James A. Maness was born Feb. 5, 1858, 
and died April 14, 1929 making his stay 
here on earth 71 years, 2 months, and 9 
days. 

He was married to Nancy L. Leach, on 
the 24th day of January, 1883, and to this 
union were born, 8 boys and 5 girls, all of 
whom are living except one boy. 

He united with the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Sugg's Creek on September 11, 
1908. The church being 12 miles away, 
he, and 10 other members of Sugg's Creek 
Church got letters of dismission and on 
Oct. 3, 1914, organized the Church at Cot- 
ton's Creek, the presbytery being com- 
posed of Elders Samuel McMillan, C. A. 
Davis and deacons A. P. Leach, N. Tucker 
and others, and on the same day, J. A. 
Maness was ordained deacon of Cotton 
Creek Church. He was not a man of 
many words, but he always stood for the 
doctrine of salvation by grace, and for 
predestination and election as set forth 
by the Apostles and Prophets, and defend- 
ed by such able elders as P. D. Gold, 
James D. Draughn, Samuel McMillan and 
others. 

Brother Maness was a kind and affec-- 
tionate husband, a firm, but loving father, 
and always commanded the respect of his 
children as well as his neighbors and all 
who knew him, in fact he lived his relig- 



94 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ion and we feel he died in the full knowl- 
edge of the triumph of "Redeeming 
Grace." 

Written by request, Jan. 3, 1931. 

L. A. Wright, Star, N. C. 

Biscoe, N. C. 



MRS. MINNIE E. LYON. 

Mrs. Minnie E. Lyon, daughter of J. B. 
Green and wife A. P. Green of Granville 
County, North Carolina was born March, 
1856 and died Dec. 24, 1930. 

She was married to Mr. A. A. Lyon in 
18 88 and helped him to raise the three 
children of her sister Mary, his first wife. 
In all the duties of life as wife, mother, 
relative, friend and neighbor she was 
true and faithful. 

In the years 1875 and 1876 she was a 
student at Wilson Collegiate Institute un- 
der the charge of Elder Sylvester Hassell 
and Mr. J. B. Brewer. While there she 
frequently attended the Primitive Baptist 
Church and often visited in the homeof 
E Ider P. D. Gold. 

She loved the Primitive Baptists and 
believed the doctrine they preached, al- 
though she never united with the church. 

She was a subscriber to Zion's Land- 
mark for many years. 

The funeral services were conducted by 
Elder J. A. Herndon in her home, after 
which her body was laid to rest in the 
cemetery at Dutchville. 

Bettie Green, Sister. 



W. M. PULLEY. 

The subject of this notice, W. M. Pulley, 
was born June, 15, 1858 and died Dec. 20, 
1930, making his stay on earth 72 years, 
6 months and 7 days. He was married to 
Sally Ann Mitchell, April 12, 1880, and to 
this union were born 9 children, the old- 
est William Sidney, who married Penina 
Petiford; Luerinda who married Gran- 
ville Drewry; William, Mary Ednor who 
married John Rudd; James Gordon who 
married Dosha; Benjamin Chufey, 
who married Margaret Johnson; Luther 
Williams who married Molly Wiggins; 
Sally, Eva and Michael, are unmarried; 
Urchey M. Pulley who married Eula John- 
son; Ella Pompy Pulley unmarried. His 
wife and his wife's sister Ella Mitchell, to- 
gether with 2 7 grandchildren are left to 
mourn their loss, but they have a bright 
hope that their loss is his eternal gain. 
They mourn, but not as those without 
hope. 

He united with the Church at Spring 
Hope about 35 years ago and was baptized 
by the writer and died in the faith of 
God's elect and in peace and love with all 
the members of that and all other 
churches. 

Brother Pulley was a noble man in 
business. He was broadminded and paid 
all his just and honest debts. 

He raised a noble family of children. 



Truly he was a good husband and father, 
and a good neighbor and we may say the 
Lord blest the work of his hands. His 
children obeyed him as long as he lived, so 
he provided a nice little inheritance for 
them all after his decease. His children 
were reared in such a way they command- 
ed the respect of all good law abiding citi- 
zens of their community. Oh! could we 
have retained this brother with us. We 
shall miss him, but the Lord called his 
spirit home in heaven. We trust after a 
prolonged duration of illness his physi- 
cian. Dr. H. Brantley and family and 
friends did everything for him that loving 
hands could do. 

So sleep on dear brother and take your 
sweet rest, we loved you, but God loved 
vou best, and took your soul to rest. 

His body was laid to rest in the new 
cemetery near the home of his son, L. W. 
Pulley. 

The funeral services were conducted in 
a simple but impressive way by the 
writer. 

Elder George Robbins, 
Durham, N. C. 



S. B. MIZZELL. 

I will try to write a short notice about 
the death of my husband as he was so very 
precious to me. I feel like I am almost 
alone and withoul a friend. He was born 
November 24, 1869, and died August 28, 
1930, making him nearly 61 years old. 
He was a great sufferer but bore his suf- 
ferings with much patience and never 
complained but very little. He said he 
wanted to do all his suffering here. I be- 
lieve he did. He prayed and rejoiced in 
his Saviour. He said only a few hours be- 
fore he died that his Saviour would soon 

be with him. He died suddenly, only 

one struggle and he was gone. Oh, I 
felt like I could never bear to part with 
him. God has made me able to bear it. 
He has promised to put no more on us 
than we can bear. 

How I do miss him. He was so good 
and kind, was a good neighbor, was hon- 
est, a smart industrious man and believed 
in treating his fellowman right. He be- 
lieved in paying his honest debts and had 
a hope in Jesus for a long time. He never 
joined the church because he thought he 
wasn't good enough. I have no doubt but 
that he is at rest and I only hope that I 
will meet him with my Saviour. 

He left his wife, one daughter and lots 
of friends to mourn their loss but we 
mourn not as those without hope for we 
believe that he is asleep in Jesus. 

Asleep in Jesus, blessed sleep, 
From which we never wake to weep. 

May God bless us all and save us in 
Christ Jesus is my prayer. 

Mrs. S. B. Mizell. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



95 



MRS. CUSSY HAYES 

By i-pqui st I wi!) I ry to write in memory 
i ll' '.• .!)• V r.'. Cussy Hayes. She 

; he twentieth eigh- 
married to Junius 
lie' writer, September 
ihu 1 liii ic'fiil ii, i',;;iiiufn eight-seven. To 
this union are one son Lloyd Hayes of 
Lucama and two daughters, Mrs. Viola 
Bass and Mrs. Mamie Matthews, also of 
Lucama. 

Cussy joined the church at Lower Black 
Creek on Septemlter the thirteenth nine- 
teen and eisht. Was baptized by Elder 
(ionr^o Boswell. She lived a faithful 
111 inber until the last which came Septem- 
li' I inili nineteen thirty. Cussy was a 
meat sutterer, never well, but always 
fillms, her seat at church, and seemed to 
enjoy it so much. Her funeral was con- 
ductor; at Lower Black Creek by Elder S. 

iiiKl I don t think I ever heard 
:;i > i 1 liite words used on such an 
spoke so comforting to the 
. i ; . s. Cussv lived the lonely 
III >:i a widow lor more than fourteen' 
years, but stayea at home with her duti- 
tul children, and made an honest living. 
She lived to see both her daughters to be- 
loiii; to the same church that she loved 
( lierished. It is hard to give up 
we love, chough it is better to de- 
aud be with Jesus than to dwell here 
.11 iiaui and attliction. But we believe 
our loss IS her eternal gain. 

Precious mother you have left us, 

Left us, yes, forevermore. 

But we hope to meet you 

On that bright and happy shore. 

Dearest mother you have left us. 
In this world to mourn, and sigh; 
Buc beyond this world of sorrow, 
We hope to meet you in that sweet by 
and by. 

Mother your face is hidden. 
And your voice is still; 
A place is vacant in our home, 
Which never can be filled. 

I feel my inability to do her justice, but 
have done the best I could. 

Written by one who loved her for 
Christ's sake. 

Mrs. S. P. Strickland. 



RESOLI TIONS OP RESPECT 
BROTHER R. D. MALONE 

Whereas it pleased God on December 
8th, 1930, to remove from our church an- 
other of our oldest members, Brother R. 
D. Malone. age (85) eis'hty-five years hav- 
ing been a member of tho church at 
Whceicis a space ot (40) forty yeais, and 
alwajs filling his seat if not providentially 
hiiKhived. The cuurch is made sad over 



th loss ol so many or! our o'.dev members, 
hoping that God who is rich in mercy will 
guide the younger members and keep us 
in the old paths and will not let us depart 
from the old Landmarks which have been 
set by our forefathers. 

Therefore be it resolved. 

First. That the church at Wheelers 
bow in humble submission to the will of 
our heavenly Father. Though we will 
miss his presence, we feel our loss is his 
eternal gain, and he is resting from his 
labors, his memories will ever live with 
us. 

Resolved, Second. That the church at 
Wheelers extend to Sister Malone and 
family their heart felt sympathy in their 
bereavement, hoping that the God of all 
grace will comfort them. 

Resolve Third. That a copy of these 
resolutions be sent to sister Malone, and 
a copy be placed on our church records, 
and a copy be sent to Zion's Landmark 
for publication. 

Done by order of Church in conference, 
January 10th, 1931. 

Elder B. F. McKenny, Mod. 
F. L. Moore, Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 
ELDER J. J. HALL 

Whereas on July the 24th, 1930, it 
pleased God to remove from this earth of 
troubles and sorrow our dearly beloved 
Pastor Elder J J. Hall, who went in and 
out before us as pastor for (25) twenty- 
five years, preaching the doctrine of sal- 
vation by grace and grace alone for time 
and eternity after expressing that he had 
no confidence in any other, and often 
speaking of that rest that awaits the peo- 
ple of God. 

And we feel that he is now in full reali- 
zation of that rest, and that the church at 
Wheelers will miss his wise councils and 
that he was a pastor in deed and in truth 
always looking after the peace of the 
church preaching peace and doctrine that 
did not divide the flock. 

Therefore be it resolved. 

First. That the church at Wheelers 
ijow in humble submission to the God of 
all grace, though we miss his presence and 
the church is grieved much at his passing. 
But we feel that he is resting from all his 
troubles and our loss is his eternal gain. 
We hope that God who guided him the 
many years that he served us will continue 
to guide our pastor to preach peace and 
our church may continue in same. 

Resolved, Second. That the church at 
Wheelers extend to the bereaved family 
their heart felt sympathy that their loss 
is irreparable, hoping that the God of all 
grace will comfort them and cause them to 
try to pattern after his Godly walk. 

Resolved, Third. That a copy of these 
resolutions be sent to the bereaved family, 
a copy be placed on our church records. 



96 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



and a copy be sent to Zion's Landmark 
for publication. 

Done by order of Church in conference, 
January 10th, 1931. 

Elder B. F. McKenny, Mod. 

F. L. Moore, Clerk. 



MRS. ALICE ANN KENLEY 

Mrs. Alice Ann Kenley, wife of Mr. F. 
M. Kenley, a farmer near East Radford, 
Virginia, died on November 26th., 1930, at 
the age of 67 years. 

She was a daughter of James Alfred and 
Usaby Surratt of Little Vine Section in 
Carroll County, Virginia, and was born on 
October 15, 1863. 

She was married to Mr. Kenley Novem- 
ber 11, 18 79. She joined the Primitive 
Baptist Church at Indian Creek in Floyd 
County in 1910 and was a consistent Chris- 
tian all of her life even through all her 
sickness from a bad case of Inflammatory 
rheumatism from which she suffered for 
thirty seven years and was confined to her 
room all the time during the last two 
year.<^ of her life, yet her faith in the Lord 
did not fail. 

She leavfcs a family to mourn her loss 
as follows: Hii'^lnnd, Francis Marion Ken- 
ley, four sons, P of Christiansburg, 
John and Oakley it Kn^t Radford and Ev- 
erett of Lynchburg, ai.a ^wo daughters, 
Mrs. Nora Semones and Miss Belle Kenley 
of East Radford, eleven grand children 
and one great grandchild. 

She was buried in Christiansburg Cem- 
etery after the funeral, which was con- 
ducted at the home of the deceased by El- 
der John Sumner, at her request. 

The six pall bearers were here grand 
sons, Evans, Lee, Garnett and Kermit 
Kenley and Thornton and Neeve Semones. 

Flower girls were her grand daughters, 
Mrs. H. C. Haden, Gladys Kenley and 
Mark Semones. 

The family loses a true, faithful and 
loving wife and mother, the church a con- 
sistent member and the community an up- 
right and a true and faithful friend. 

May her example of womanly culture 
and upright living be a pattern for those 
who follow after her. 



sliiped and loved for comfort. Third, 
that a copy of these resolutions be sent to 
his family and a copy be spread upon our 
church book and a copy be sent to Zion's 
Landmark for publication 

We know the family has lost a good 
husband and father, the church has lost 
a loving brother, and we shall miss his 
council. 

Done by order of Saints Delight Prim- 
itive Baptist Church in conference Satur- 
day, December 15, 1930. 

Eld. J. A. Flagg, Mod. 

H. Z. Williard, Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 
BROTHER JOE P. LONG 

Resolution of respect of our dearly be- 
loved Brother, Joe P. Long, who departed 
this life January 18th, 1930, in his pass- 
ing the Church at Wheelers lost one of its 
olders members who always filled his seat 
if not providentially hindered. 

He was a man that was blessed with a 
spiritual mind for you seldom saw him 
that he didn't mention some passage of 
scripture, and loved to talk on them. 

Resolved, First. 

That the Church at Wheelers has lost a 
faithful member and one of its oldest. We 
feel to bow in humble submission to the 
God of all grace who doeth all things well. 
Though we are grieved at his passing, nol 
as we would for those that are without 
hope, for he was blessed to live to a ripe 
old age and we feel that our loss is his 
eternal gain. 

Resolved, Second. 

That the church at Wheelers extend to 
the bereaved family their heart felt sym- 
pathy, hoping that God who is rich in 
mercy will comfort them. 

Resolved, Third. 

That a copy of these resolutions be 
placed on our church records and a copy 
be sent to the bereaved family and a copy 
sent to Zion's Landmark for publication. 

Done by order of Church in conference, 
January 10th, 1931. 

Elder B. F. McKenny, Mod. 
F. L. Moore, Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas God in His wisdom saw fit to 
visit our little flock since our last meeting 
and removed our dearly beloved brother, 
B. X. Linville by death, he united with 
Ihe church here Saturday before the sec- 
ond Sunday in May, 19 29, and lived a 
most devoted brother until death. 

Therefore be it resolved, first, that we 
bow in humble submission to this dispen- 
sation of Divine Providnece feeling that 
our loss is His eternal gain. Second, that 
we extend to his wife and children in this 
sad bereavement, our heartfelt sympathy 
and we point them to the Saviour he wor- 



THREE DAY MEETING AT PILOT 
MOUNTAIN. 

P. D. Gold Publishing Co., 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Mr. Editor: 

Please publish in Zion's Landmark our 
three days meeting, to be held with the 
church at Pilot Mountain, beginning Fri- 
day before fifth Sunday in March, 1931. 
A general invitation is extended to our 
sister churches and Associations to be 
with us. 

Respectfully, 

Elder Geo. Denny, 

Pilot Mountain, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

= AT ^^^^^^^^ 7,-= 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLi; 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAP'rV. ^ 

VOL. LXIV. FEBRUARY 15, 1931 No. 7 



WHEN HER FAITH GAVE OUT THE OIL STAYED. 

"Now there cried a certain woman of the wives of the sons of the 
prophets unto Elisha, saying, Thy servant my husband is dead; and thou 
knowest that thy servant did fear the Lord: and the creditor is come to 
take unto him my two sons as bondsmen. 

And Elisha said unto her, what shall I do for thee? tell me what hast 
thou in the house? And she said, Thine handmaid hath not anything in 
the house, save a pot of oil. 

Then he said, Go, borrow thee vessels abroad of all thy neighbors, even 
empty vessels; borrow not a few. 

And when thou art come in, thou shalt shut the door upon thee and 
upon thy sons, and shall pour out into all those vessels, and thou shalt 
set aside, that which is full. 

So she went from him, and shut the door upon her and upon her sons, 
who brought the vessels to her; and she poured outc 

And it came to pass, when the vessels were full, that she said unto her 
son. Bring ms yet a vessel. And he said unto her. There is not a vessel 
more. And the oil stayed. 

Then she came and told the man of God. And he said. Go, sell the oil, 
and pay thy debt, and live thou and thy children of the rest." 

— 2 Kings, 4:1-7. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EOITOflS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Zion'^ Xan6marh 

Bcvotcb to the Cause of S^esus Cbdst 



THE SINFULNESS OF SIN. 

To The Household of Faith, 
Beloved of the Lord, Greeting: 

I would write of the exceeding 
sinfulness of sin: I feel to know 
more about this subject than any 
other, seeing that sin is mixed with 
all I do. 

It seems to have a part in my ev- 
ery waking thought, my very soul 
is sick of it, it has become to me a 
cankerous sore, a leprous thing, a 
thing abhorred. As we see the 
pure rays of sunshine sometime fill- 
ed with innumerable particles of 
germ-laden dust, so do I feel that 
when the blessed rays of the sun- 
shine of the presence of my dear 
Saviour shine in my poor heart, 
there is so much sin there that its 
brilliance is beclouded thereby, and 
I cannot feel its warmth as I would. 

But Paul says, "When the com- 
mandment came, sin revived and I 
died.' Now with him I can say that 
"I die daily," for the "command- 
ment which was ordained unto life, 
T found to be unto death. For sin, 
taking occasion by the command- 
ment, deceived me, and by it slew 
me. Wherefore the law is holy — 
and the commandment is holy and 
just and good. Was then that 
which is good made death unto 
me? God forbid. But sin, that 
it might appear sin, working death 
in me by that which is good; that 
sin by the commandment might be- 
come exceeding sinful." I^omans 
7:9-13. 



I feel so vile, so sinful, so beneath 
every one who claims a hope in the 
Saviour this morning, that I feel 
-surely not one of you can have fel- 
lowship for me — tbat any one of 
God's dear children would iiave to 
loan very low and stretch their 
hand a great ways to touch my out- 
stretched hand with their linger 
tips. 

This sin, that is a part of my 
every-day life! what shall I say? 
Paul further says, "There is there- 
fore, now no condemnation to them 
which are in Christ Jesus, who walk 
not after the flesh, but after the 
spirit," which only proves to me 
that I am continually walking after 
the flesh for I am condemned and 
made to mourn and beg for mercy. 
"Behold I'm vile." I believe I know 
right today how Peter felt when he 
went out and wept bitterly. For 
does not my daily life deny my 
Lord? Have not I this day shed 
bitter tears because of sin? I know 
that my Saviour is merciful — I be- 
lieve I know something of the look 
in His eyes that caused Peter to 
weep, that look of unutterably ten- 
der compassion that pitied rather 
than condemned the poor, weak 
apostle who followed a long way 
off. And a long way off is the way 
I follow if indeed I follow at all. 
And how I long to follow in His 
footsteps, to go the way the Saviour 
went, to walk in Wisdom's ways, 
"whose ways are ways of pleasant- 
ness and all her paths are peace." 



98 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



— ?rov. 3:17. 

But I see another law in my mem- 
bers, warring against the law of 
my mind, and bringing me into cap- 
tivity to the law of sin which is in 
my members. "O ! wretched man 
that I am! who shall deliver me 
from the body of this death?" I 
know there is One "Who delivered 
us from so great a death, and doth 
deliver: in Whom we trust that He 
will yet deliver us." 

O ! may He turn His hand upon 
me who feels to become of the least 
of the little ones, and comfort me, 
and lead me beside the still waters, 
and restore my soul. 

Again, behold I'm vile! But I 
know that His mercy endureth for- 
ever and in this is my hope and all 
my salvation. Is there, I wonder 
a little one somewhere who feels as 
I do? Then you have fellowship 
for the least in the Father's house. 

Mary J. Thigpen, 
Greensboro, N. C, R. 4. 



SELF RIGHTEOUSNESS. 

There is such a thing as one ap- 
pearing over-righteous. When you 
find one of that type you will find a 
meddler in other people's affairs 
and things that do not concern him. 
For he feels his own self-righteous- 
ness of which no true Israelite ever 
has too much, and often feels that 
he has none. If he has it is all in 
and of God and not of and in self. 
It justifies him to set up his stand- 
ards by which he feels that it is suf- 
ficient to govern others by and he 
goes about, giving orders, dictating, 
usurping, commanding thus and so, 
shall be and not be. Such med- 
dlers are in the minority, among 
the sisters as well as among the 
brethren. They feel that they 
themselves are patterns, whereby 



others shall follow — yes, feel to be 
examples for their own righteous- 
ness has placed them as superiors 
that others should follow, not know- 
ing that their righteousness is as 
filthy rags, and if they could see 
and know themselves as they are 
known of God they would feel 
abashed and forever keep silent as 
far as telling others what they 
should do. But this righteousness 
has blinded them to their own true 
selves so that they are forever judg- 
ing and looking on the other fellow, 
trying to keep him straight and 
feeling that they are doing God's 
service. I guess they are, for it is 
greed, popularity and notoriety that 
they are seeking by such meddling 
and they get it but only in their es- 
timation, and in that they glory. 
They feel exalted that they are ap- 
pearing to be smarter than others, 
that they are seeking to teach and 
instruct in the paths of duty and 
righteousness, not knowing that 
they are ignorant and unlearned as 
pertains to the righteousness of 
Christ, and are weak in the faith. 
That is why they are thus. If they 
were fully established in the faith 
they would be strong enough to 
attend to their own affairs which 
would be all they could do and 
more. They do not have time to 
meddle and confuse their minds 
with the affairs of others. That 
has been and is no concern of 
theirs, and why it should be, is a 
question I cannot solve. For it is 
nothing to them that is not theirs. 
It is just a smart act, at first appear- 
ing wise. Yes, they are full of 
wisdom. They know so much, are 
full and running over with knowl- 
edge. They must import some of it 
by instructing and teaching — but 
they only expose their folly, and 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



99 



show what they truly are — med- 
dlers, and that is a poor job, and 
one that should make those that 
are, hang their heads in shame and 
ask God to have mercy upon them 
and deliver them from such a curse, 
shame and disgrace, for it is noth- 
ing more and God will strip them of 
their own righteousness and clothe 
them in His own spotless righteous- 
ness, and that they may be in their 
right mind. So that they may be 
at the feet of Jesus and learn of 
Him. 

When there you will esteem them 
all your superiors, all better than 
you are, and you will see that you 
will have enough to do to look well 
to your own house and keep it in 
decency and order. When you 
learn to do that you will be in your 
own calling, and not before. 

Effie H. Carrawan. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

Elder D. M. Vail, 

My dear brother in Christ: 

I want to write you a few lines 
to let you know that I still love you 
and will not cease to love you so 
long as I remain in this world. Lit- 
tle did I think when I received your 
last precious letter that it would be 
so long before I would reply to it, 
and yet, if you could know the dark- 
ness and the sins that have beset me 
since I received your letter you 
would rather pity me than score me 
through your sweet fellowship. 

I have said to myself many times 
in the past few years that I would 
lay my pen down forever and never 
write again, or make an effort to 
write — not even a line, to God's 
precious children, but alas! it is 
written: "The ways of man are not 
in himself, for it is not in man that 
walketh to direct his steps," and 



you and I know that we can never 
direct our own thoughts. The 
Apostle writes, or has written: 
"Work out your own salvation with 
fear and trembling for it is God 
that worketh in you, both to will 
and to do of His own good pleas- 
ure," and again it is written : "It is 
not of him that serveth nor of him 
that willeth but of God that show- 
eth mercy. He will have mercy on 
whom he will have mercy and 
whom He will He hardeneth." 

Dear Brother Vail, I had not 
thought of calling attention to the 
above named scriptures when I sat 
down to write but thought that I 
would try and tell you that I hope 
I still continue to love you for the 
truth's sake. Still, while I am writ- 
ing I feel so dark and downcast, so 
much so, that I fear that I have no 
hope at all and it seems to me like 
hope against hope. I attended the 
corresponding meeting in Virginia 
two days last week and I did not 
see a face that I saw 45 years ago 
last August. All the dear minis- 
ters and brethren and sisters that 
were there then have passed over 
to the better land. The Heavenly 
Land, where they have no sorrow 
and afflictions. 

One of the dear old poets said: 
"O Land of Rest, for thee I sigh. 
When will the moment come? 
When shall I lay my armor by. 
And dwell with Christ at Home?" 

And again he said in conclusion 
of his song: 

"Weary of wandering, 'round and 
'round 

This vale of sin and gloom, 

I long to leave unhallowed ground 

And dwell with Christ at home." 

My precious brother and sister 
Vail, this may be the last letter that 
1 shall be enabled to write you, for 



100 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



I fee^- that my days are far too short 
for letter writing, yet when I re- 
ceive a sweet, brotherly letter from 
you I am made to weep that you 
can think so sweetly of me who feels 
to be the greatest sinner on God's 
green earth. 

My wife and I are still living 
alone and wo ars both feeble and 
weak with totterin^j steps, not know- 
ing one hour what a day may 
bring forth. I do hope when you 
receive this scribble it will find you 
and dear sister Vail in better health 
and a better frame of mind than I 
feel myself to be in. 

Pray for me, dear brother, while 
at the throne of grace, and don't 
forget to remember that we still 
love you as a dear brother and sis- 
ter and a true servant of the most 
high God. 

Lovingly, your poor brother who 
feels to be a worm and no man. 

John F. Oliver. 

P. S. — I have been reading your 
letters published in Zion's Land- 
mark and have enjoyed reading 
them very much, I subscribed to 
the Landmark a few days ago for 
six months. I like reading the 
Landmark for it gives us good 
news from a far country. May 
God bless the editors and publish- 
ers of this medium of correspend- 
ence. — J. F. O. 

You may publish this letter of 
brother Olivers any time you 
choose. We have been life long 
friends. His home has been my 
home for about 50 years. I love 
him and his dear wife. 

D. M. Vail. 



ST. JOHN 1:10. 

"He was in the world, and the 
world was made by him, and the 
world knew him not." He came 



unto his own, (nation) and his own 
received him not. He was in the 
world, and first appeared as a babe 
in Bethlehem, but he was unknown 
to some then, and we may trace 
Him from the "cradle to the grave" 
and see this same truth. "Who is 
it Lord," was the question put by 
one who was raised in the "lap of 
learning," and he said — God reveal- 
ed His Son in Him. The shepherd's 
must be guided by a star which 
stood over him, "When they saw 
the star, they rejoiced with great 
and exceeding joy." "They are 
dead which sought the young child's 
life." These quotations show how 
different ones felt about him. 

This change being absolutely of 
God, all boasting is done away, and 
God is the potter who shapes the 
vessel as he desired it to be. "He 
was in the world," but is not now, 
for he ascended far above the 
heavens, and now holds the glory 
he had with the Father before the 
world began. 

And this leads us to say that ev- 
ery word of his prayer in John, 
17th Chapter, was head of the 
father and answered. 

"They have known surely that I 
came out from thee." I pray for 
them: I pray not for the world, but 
for them thou hast given me out of 
the world. "He was in the world, 
and the world was made by Him, 
but the world knew Him not. Even 
His disciples took him for a stran- 
ger, and Mary thought he was a 
gardener. "He opened their under- 
standing that they might under- 
stand the scripture," and none from 
then until now know him only in 
the same way. "It is the master," 
said Peter, after he had seen how 
Jesus broke down the middle wall 
of partition between Jews and Gen- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



101 



tiles, and made both one. "I pray 
that they may be one" and they are 
one. In Gal. 3rd chapter, and 26th 
verse, we find the following: 

"For ye are all the children of 
God by faith in Christ Jesus." 
"One faith, one Lord, and one bap- 
tism." The world was made by 
him, and without him was not any- 
thing made that was made, and by 
him all things consist. 

J. T. SATTERWHITE. 



A LETTER FROM A SCHOOL 
GIRL. 

Mr. John Gold, 
Wilson, N. C. 

Dear Friend and I hope brother: 

In looking over some old letters 
there is one I am sending you and if 
you feel like this letter is worthy of 
space in Landmark I am sure that 
the writer would not object to it 
being published. I saw this little 
sister's experience in print and I 
wrote her and this was her reply. I 
was glad to receive such a good let- 
ter personally and I just think there 
are many more that would be glad 
to read such a good letter from just 
a school girl. I will leave it with 
you as to it's being put in print. 

Very respectfully, 
L. W. TEMPLE, 

Lake View, S. C. 



Mr. L. W. Temple, 

Lake View, South Carolina, 

Dear Brother: 

I received your letter a long time 
ago, it is now, and I am honestly 
ashamed to write you now, but I 
would not let such a good, encour- 
aging letter pass by. It did en- 
courage me a great deal and I will 
just write without any explanation. 

Soon after I received your letter 
my beloved grandmother died. Of 



course I was so upset I hardly knew 
enough to prepare my lessons at 
school. She was not just "grand- 
ma" associated with cookies, etc., 
like most other grannies are. She 
was far from fantastical. She was 
77 years old; a devout old-Baptist 
and worried a great deal on my be- 
half. She encouraged me every 
day I was with her. When I wrote 
the little article to the paper she 
was living and well. When she 
read it she wept and said she was 
satisfied about me and that she 
would like to go "home" knowing 
her last days were nearing their 
end. That was Saturday. Mon- 
day she dropped dead. No one 
but my own self knows my loss. It 
is hard even yet to give here away 
though often I see her very pres- 
ence and feel her and hear her 
speak to me. The last words she 
spoke to me were, "Be patient" — I 
must! 

I could not bear to write then for 
awhile and just about two weeks 
ago we journeyed back to the same 
cemetery and laid near-by my in- 
fant brother. With all the work 
bestowed upon me and being a sen- 
ior in high school you see — maybe 
you can see and pardon me. 

You said in your letter that you 
hoped I would write again to the 
paper. Perhaps I shall when I can 
feel that I'm not utterly desolate 
and am not entirely surrounded by 
trouble, because I know that with- 
out Him I am as a tiny beetle, with- 
out ability to swim, upon the rolling 
waters of the great, high seas; en- 
tirely upon the mercy of the waves 
and can without Him write nothing 
to the comfort of one little child of 
God. If you enjoyed the experi- 
ence in any way, please do not give 
me one atom of praise. I am only 



102 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



too glad that I can say and feel that 
the praise is all due my Saviour. 

You said God had been wonder- 
fully good to you but surely you can 
not feel the goodness as keenly as I. 
I had been so rebellious and mean 
and cold-hearted that his goodness 
can not even be told, written, or in 
any way expressed. Since I have 
come home to my friends and loved 
ones I have been happy — supreme- 
ly happy when I could look beyond 
my trials and sorrows. I hope that 
when other trials come I can re- 
member that I am suffering for His 
sake and that He has promised 
"never to leave me alone." 

As you also stated, the longer I 
live with Old Baptists the more 
I will love them. I have already 
found that statement true from my 
little bit of experience in that line. 
On my last meeting day it seemed 
that my cup was running over with 
love. I was made to forget all sor- 
row and bask in the arms of my 
saviour's love — for a little while. I 
was made to wonder why I was 
blessed with the love of these dear 
people when others are so much 
more worthy. They have been more 
than precious to me and I am sure if 
it were not for their tender love and 
care over me, I should sometimes 
fall. Our dear pastor is so loving 
kind, self-sacrificing — oh, these 
little words do not do justice to him. 
He is so humble with it and has the 
sincere love and interest of every 
child of God who knows him. I 
know that if he knew that I had 
written these words in his behalf he 
would say, "Do not give me any 
praise. I am but a weak man. 
Christ deserves the praise." And 
I always add that by the grace of 
God he is what he is and know that 
will satisfy him and also be true. 



Also I have learned • to add to my 
own self; if I have ever been the 
slightest comfort to any one it is 
through the love and grace of God 
and for His own divine purpose. 

I can only endorse all you have 
said, dear brother, and wish I could 
know you in the flesh and clasp 
your hand in fellowship and Chris- 
tian love. 

Please do not forget me as a lit- 
tle girl; tempest-tossed, cast among 
much temptation in school life and 
worldly peoples though happy in 
my Lord, and trying to do right and 
hold His banner high — high! I 
would ask an interest in your pray- 
ers — that this troubled breast be 
eased — and the favor of another in- 
spiring letter. 

I beg you to consider that I'm but 
a school-girl just learning and par- 
don all mistakes as well as the pa- 
per and "scribbling" thereon 

Yours in Christian love if I know 
it's meaning, 

Fay Roberts, 
35 South Main St., 
Amory, Miss. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

Dear Friend in the Lord: 

Here is a good letter from a pre- 
cious sister, Bertie Harris William- 
son of Greensboro, N. C, from my 
old home church where my mem- 
bership is. I am too feeble to visit 
them at present, though many are 
the times that I have spent many 
precious moments with some of 
those dear children of God. They 
love the Lord and live in peace and 
sweet fellowship. As unworthy as 
I feel to be at times, there is noth- 
ing sweeter in this life than the gos- 
pel of the Son of God and the love, 
peace and fellowship of His dear 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



103 



children — the children of the true 
and living God. Dear ones, please 
remember me at a throne of grace. 
May God bless you and yours in a 
sweet hope of Heaven. 

J. R. JONES, 
Pilot Mountain, N. C. 



The Letter 

706 Walker Ave. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

Dear Bro. Jones: 

You may receive several letters 
telling about the meeting last Sun- 
day, all of which will be more in- 
teresting than mine; however, I 
will tell it in my way. 

Brother King read from the pul- 
pit your interesting and comfort- 
ing letter' which we all enjoyed, 
and instructed brother Neal to an- 
swer in behalf of the church. 

I am glad you are able to be up 
and around some, and hope you can 
come and be with us at our meeting 
before long. We still miss you in 
your seat. 

I have been blessed to go to 
preaching this summer more than 
usual Mr. Williamson and I went 
to Lick Fork to the Association the 
4th Sunday in July. We were there 
Saturday and Sunday and heard 
Brother Key on Saturday. It was 
sweet to me for I had not attended 
our Association in about eight 
years, I think. Just could not get 
there, it seemed. We also went to 
Prospect Hill last Sunday. I was 
never there before and I enjoyed it 
all around. The preaching was so 
good. I don't remember it well 
enough to tell it, but I know it was 
pleasant to listen to. 

They missed brother Pink War- 
ren who died the week before. I 
suppose you have heard of his 
death. 



Our meeting last Sunday was just 
a feast of fat things. Others will 
tell you about it. The communion 
service at sister Belle Benton's was 
sweet, too. 

Mr. Williamson and I are both 
well and send greetings. Mama 
writes me often. She has been 
going to good meetings, too. 

Best regards to brother and 
sister Key, 

Bertie Harris Williamson. 



"THE VERY HAIRS OF YOUR 
HEAD ARE ALL NUMBERED." 
Matt. 10:30. 

"I believe that every particle of 
dust that dances in the sunbeam 
does not move an atom more or less 
than God wishes — that every par- 
ticle of spray that dashes against 
the steamboat has its orbit as well 
as the sun in the heavens — that the 
chaff from the hand of the winnow- 
er is steered as the stars in their 
courses. The creep of an apis over 
the rosebud is as much fixed as the 
march of the devastating pestilence 
— the fall of seer leaves from the 
poplar is as fully ordained as the 
tumbling of an avalanche. 

"He that believes in a God must 
believe this truth. There is no 
standing point between this and 
Atheism. There is no halfway be- 
tween a mighty God that worketh 
all things after the sovereign coun- 
sel of his will and no God at all. 

"A God that cannot do as he 
pleases — a God whose will is frus- 
trated, is not God, and cannot be* 
God, I could not believe in such a 
God as that." 

— From a published sermon of 
Charles Haddon Spurgeon, preach- 
er of Christ's Gospel at "Metropoli- 
tan Tabernacle," London, England. 



104 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



A GOOD LETTER. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

I am sending you a letter written 
to me by my nephew, brother J. W. 
Jones. The sentiment contained 
in this letter so much accords with 
my own feelings, perhaps others 
vould like to read it. 

With his consent, you may pub- 
lish same in Landmark if you think 
proper. If not all will be well with 
me. 

Fannie Safley, 
Wadesboro, N. C, R. 3. 



Sunday evening. 

Dear Aunt Fannie: 

Something most unusual for me, I 
did not attend church service any- 
where or go to town yesterday or 
today. I did visit some sick 
friends and carried corn to a coun- 
try mill yesterday, but have not 
been out of sight of my home today. 
Have read some religious papers 
and much in the Bible. Wonderful 
to read of the creation of this earth 
and of bow God formed or created 
man and how He has spoken to His 
people by the prophets of old and 
then of the birth, life and character 
of His holy Son and of His humble 
and obedient sacrifice of His pre- 
cious blood on the cross at Gol- 
gotha, for the sins of those whom 
He came to save, the elect of God 
chc)SGn in him (Chrisl Jesijs) be- 
fore the foundation of the world, 
that He (Christ) could present 
them to the Father in iove and 
without spot. How meekly this 
precious One (Jesus) submitted to 
the scourgings, rebuffs and false ac- 
cusations v-^f his accusers and tlien 
how He died on that rugged cross, 
net for H]s sins, but for ours, as He 
was sinless, but our sins required 
just such an offering, as nothing 



loss would suffice. Then to read 
on and be blest to believe and hope 
in His blessed resurrection and as- 
cension. Yes, to feel that His great 
mercy and loving kindness has been 
revealed to us to the extent that we 
have hope of the life that now is 
and also that eternal life beyond. 
To feel to be a sharer of his dear 
mercies and sweet promises. O, 
how wonderful to hope in Christ 
for Salvation, as He is all in all. 
Then, I read the impressive descrip- 
tion of how Paul and Silas were 
cast into prison, even put in stocks 
and bonds and how at midnight 
they prayed and sang songs and 
how the earth quaked and the jail 
doors were opened and these dear 
men of God became loosed from 
their bands of confinement and then 
how their tormentors had to come 
and fetch them out. This all shows 
the wonderful works of God and 
should teach us as a people to trust 
in the Lord and not man, for vain is 
the help of man. Just imagine, 
what would have resulted had the 
friends of Paul and Silas tried to 
have released them before mid- 
night on this occasion referred to. 
How much better to wait upon the 
Lord. He certainly most miracu- 
lously delivered the Hebrew chil- 
dren from the fiery furnace and the 
faithful Daniel from harm in the 
Lion's den. My meditation through- 
out his day has been solemn and 
serious and for some cause you, 
dear aunt, came on my mind and as 
I believe you know and understand 
me possibly well as any one, I have 
thus written you, in the hope that 
you can witness with me and agree 
that in the Lord alone is all our 
trust and hope. 

J. W. JONES, 
Peachland, N. C, R. 2. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



105 



ZioD^s Landmark 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
Elder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rovi^e, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. No. 7 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C, FEB. 15, 1931 



LET US REASON TOGETHER. 

There seems to be a world wide 
tendency, in both church and world, 
to discredit those in authority and 
to rail against or criticise each 
other, man against man, minister 
against minister, class against class, 
faction against faction and church 
against church. 

One man, faction, class or school 
of thought, in political or religious 
life, may argue that nothing is right 
except their views and conten- 
tions; but others, of our political or 
religious organizations, may be just 
as honest and sincere in holding 
their views, not fully in accord with 
each other in the same political or 
church organizations. 

We should be honest and sincere 
in our religious beliefs and convic- 
tions — but in the language of the 
late Elder P. G. Lester, "Let us be 
slow to condemn, too rigidly, for we 



might be wrong sometimes our- 
selves." 

It is not our purpose to compro- 
mise with known error, nor do we 
advise others to do so; but it is 
well that we examine ourselves to 
see if we be in the faith and that 
our contentions are clearly in ac- 
cord with the teachings of Holy 
Writ; remembering that all do not 
have the same dispensation of the 
Spirit, some being called as teach- 
ers; some to exhortation, some are 
set for a defense in the gospel and 
etc., and yet all to profit with all, 
and all of the same spirit. 

The eye, we are told, has no right 
to say to the ear "I have no need of 
thee, the hand to the foot I have no 
need of thee, and etc. All are 
members of the same body and all 
to profit; but some are known as 
the more honored members of the 
body, and so with the gifts and 
callings of the Lord, all are profit- 
able in abiding in their respective 
callings, and most of us are misfits 
if we try to preach the other man's 
logic or in his manner. 

It is well for us to remember the 
admonition, "Remove the beam 
from thine own eye, before being 
too much concerned about the mote 
in thy brother's eye." 

During the past years of our 
recollection of Primitive Baptists, 
and their ministry, we have had 
able men, godly men, men of the 
highest character, who have been 
great preachers and yet not fully 
agreed on the doctrine of predesti- 
nation. 

Ministers like Elders John C. Hall 
of Virginia, Silas H. Durand of 
Pennsylvania and others, were 
known as advocates of the predesti- 
nation of all things, and yet as El- 
der Durand said to the writer, "Not 



106 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



to the point that it made God the 
author of sin." 

These men were of the highest 
character, men who lived godly 
lives and it could not have been 
justly said of them, that their ad- 
vocacy of the doctrine of predesti- 
nation was for the purpose of cover- 
ing up their own shortcomings or 
as an excuse for unholy deeds. 

We have had others, such men 
as Elder E. Rittenhouse, Sylvester 
Hassell and many others who were 
men of unquestioned character, and 
ministers of highest standing, who 
were not so fully established in the 
predestination of all things and yet 
both schools of thought, (often call- 
ed extremes) lived peaceably and 
lovingly as brethren and ministers, 
esteeming each other as ministers 
of the Word. In saying that some 
were not fully established in the 
doctrine of predestination as others 
we do not wish to be understood as 
meaning that either of the ministers 
mentioned by name were unsound. 
Each had his calling and faithfully 
and lovingly abided in the same. 

One class dwelt much in the 
Wills and Shalls of Jehovah, firm 
as the everlasting hills in their con- 
viction that God ruled supremely in 
Heaven and in earth and that sin, 
though of the Devil, was over-ruled 
to the glory and honor of God. 

Others dwelt much on the out- 
ward manifestations of the Chris- 
tian walk and character, holding 
fast the doctrine of grace; but ad- 
monishing the people of God to. put 
off the old man and his deeds, and 
to earnestly endeavor to lay aside 
the weight, and the sin that doth 
so easily beset us, ever looking to 
the Lord the author and finisher of 
our faith, for every help in the time 
of need. 



Such men were not afraid to ad- 
monish their hearers to abstain 
from evil deeds, and unholy and un- 
clean conversation, and were es- 
teemed by all as being men of the 
highest integrity. 

Peace be to the ashes of such a 
ministry. The day is sufficient un- 
to the evil thereof, and the Grace 
of God is sufficient for every day 
and trial. 

We all need His Grace to sustain 
us in all our trials. All are sinners 
by nature, and by practice, unless 
restrained by the goodness and 
mercy of God, therefore let us all 
be found looking over each other 
for good and not for evil. 

During the coming years, may we 
not live, and serve as did our able 
and worthy ministers, many of 
whom have gone to their eternal 
home, each abiding in his own 
calling and each esteeming others 
as better than ourselves. 

When time has wafted us on to 
the eternal beyond, may it be said 
of us, as of so many of our able 
ministers gone before, "They were 
humble followers of Christ and use- 
ful servants of the household of 
faith." 

In hope, 
O. J. DENNY. 



MARY, THE MOTHER OF JESUS. 

Next to Eve, the mother of all 
living, Mary is the most extoled wo- 
man in all the annals of time; and 
not only so, but is worthy of all 
Christian consideration. Still there 
is very little recorded of her in the 
scriptures, and what is said, for the 
most part, is in brief utterances; but 
if for nothing more than being the 
mother of Jesus her memory will be 
ever cherished by the Lord's people 
while they remain on earth. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



107 



Most people judge the beauty of 
a woman by her outward appear- 
ances, and these Mary may have 
possessed in a marked degree, but 
her outstanding beauty consisted in 
the gracious soulfulness of her 
bearing. It is through the expres- 
sion of the quality of her soul that 
one may see a picture of the rare 
charm and lovely beauty of this wo- 
man. No other woman ever came 
so prominently into marvelous his- 
tory as did the Virgin Mary. While 
Isaiah the prophet of the Lord, had 
declared 742 years before, saying, 
"Behold a virgin shall conceive, and 
bear a son, and shall call his name 
Immanuel"; but no human being 
could know who this virgin should 
be until "the angel Gabriel was sent 
from God, unto a city of Galilee, 
named Nazareth, to a virgin, es- 
poused to a man whose name was 
Joseph, of the house of David; and 
the Virgin's name was Mary, and 
the angel came in unto her, and 
said, Hail, thou art highly favored, 
the Lord is with thee: blessed art 
thou among women" What did this 
mean? It meant that she was wor- 
thy of the closest relationship with 
God, — to be the mother of the long- 
looked-for Messiah. Only think that 
this woman was to be the matrix out 
of which the physical form, God 
manifest in the flesh, should come. 

Doubtless, this Virgin Mary had 
received eternal life and salvation, 
but these divine gifts made her no 
more highly favored than any other 
blessed mother in Israel. To be 
blessed of God does not exalt his 
'services in nature, but humbles them 
iGodward. Mary made no ado 
; about this promise from God, but 
jmeekly accepted the trust in a quiet 
dignity: "Behold the handmaid of 



the Lord; be it unto me according 
to thy word." 

Furthermore, "and Mary said, 
My soul doth magnify the Lord, 
and my spirit hath rejoiced in God 
my Saviour. For he hath regard- 
ed the low estate of his hand- 
maiden; for, behold, from hence- 
forth all generations shall call me 
blessed. For he that is mighty hath 
done to me great things; and holy 
is his name." Let all the saints in 
every generation bless Mary, the 
mother of Jesus ; for by his birth 
was manifested to them a flesh, 
blood and bone relationship to the 
God-man, conjoined in a covenant 
of grace unity. God forbid that 
they should ever serve and worship 
the Virgin Mary the mother of 
Jesus; but who afterward became 
the mother of sons and daughters 
by Joseph, her husband. The scrip- 
tures nowhere intimate that she 
should be worshipped; and what 
sacriligious idolatry to do so, as 
well as vain to teach as do the 
Baptists that the testimony of scrip- 
ture in Proverbs 8:22-31 refers and 
applies to the heir, which unques- 
tionably refers to the Son of God. 

This true Mary loved her son and 
every true man loves his mother. 
Before Jesus ascended to glory he 
commended his mother to the care 
of John, the loving apostle. 

At the marriage feast of Cana, 
which Jesus and his mother attend- 
ed, who is there that cannot see her 
domesticity, the obedience com- 
manded, her happy disposition and 
watchful care of others? It is 
the wine was wanted, Jesus, at his 
obedient to Mary and Joseph.When 
the wine was wanted Jesus, at his 
mother's request, had the water 
pots filled with water, and then 
made wine out of it, and had the 



108 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



servants bear it unto the governor, 
vi^hich when he had tasted declared 
that they had "kept the good wine 
until now." By the way it is a good 
thing that Jesus is not here in this 
fanatic age, for then Jesus and the 
ruler and his company would be 
cast into prison. It was a religious 
people, not followers and lovers of 
Christ, that had put him to death, 
crucified. 

Parents should teach their chil- 
dren to respect the true doctrine of 
God, to be honest, moral, truthful 
and obedient. Not send them to 
religious schools where all the false 
theories and doctrines are taught. 
It is true no Christian parent can 
make his children love the Bible or 
the Lord. I allow none but God 
can do that. But by loving, kind 
admonition a Christian parent will 
not make his children hate these 
good teachings. Obedience, as a 
habit, becomes natural faith. No 
habit over the lives of children is 
worth more than this. Early obed- 
ience has all scripture on its side. 
It is said to Abraham's praise, not 
merely that he trained well, but "he 
will command his children and his 
household after him." Paul severe- 
ly condemns disobedience to par- 
ents. He also says that deacons 
should have their own children in 
subjection with gravity, ruling them 
and their house well. This injunc- 
tion would be good advice to all 
heads of families. 

Now, I find I am about to turn 
aside from history of the Virgin 
Mary, to obedience, which I am 
sure if all should follow teaching 
of the scriptures, most things would 
be far better than they are now. 

M. L. GILBERT. 



ENJOY HIS LETTERS. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 
Dear Sir: 

You will please publish inclosed 
letters. Pardon me for being so 
lengthy, but I am getting old and 
will not bother you much longer. 
Think it strange I have never met 
you. Your father has been my 
guest many times, and how I did 
love and respect him. 

Respectfully, 

R. L. DODSON. 



I trust you will be spared many 
years in the service of your Master. 
It would give me a great deal of 
pleasure to have the privilege of 
meeting you. I have always en- 
joyed your letters and wish you 
would write often. 

J. D. GOLD. 



My Dear Brother Dodson: 

I feel like I want to talk a little 
with you this morning, and I do not 
know of anything so important for 
those who have made the profes- 
sion you and I have to talk about, as 
the greatness of the God we wor- 
ship, and the blessed hope he has 
given us in his dear son, Jesus 
Christ. Is he not indeed a wonder- 
ful God? His being and nature is 
too high and mysterious for our fin- 
ite minds to search out. But we 
can, if he gives us grace, talk a lit- 
tle about this high and holy one. 
There was a beginning to all ma- 
terial things on earth and all that 
pertains to it. Our God made them. 
He is before all things. How won- 
derful that when there was nothing 
but empty space, there was an holy 
all wise and all powerful being 
that was present throughout all the 
universe who was powerful enough 
to create out of nothing this huge 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



109 



ball with all its attendant elements, 
and wise enough to shape it in its 
present form. Sea and land and 
mountains, valley, with all its min- 
erals and metals all for the use of 
man whom he was going to place 
upon it, and then he formed man of 
the dust of the ground and 
breathed into him the breath of life 
and placed him into a beautiful gar- 
den which his own hand had made, 
where there was everything neces- 
sary for his comfort except he was 
without an helpmate, and the Lord, 
seeing that it was not good for him 
to be alone, took one of his ribs and 
made a woman, and brought her to 
him. O how good the Lord was to 
man. What more could he ask, a 
beautiful earth to live upon, a beau- 
tiful garden to live in, and a most 
charming companion who was a 
part of himself, to live with him and 
help him and yet with all these won- 
derful blessings he was so base as 
to transgress his Maker's law and 
thus become a vile sinner worthy to 
be cast out of the garden to till the 
ground which should bring forth 
thorns and thistles to him. O how 
unworthy he has proved himself of 
the many blessings his Creator has 
given him, and yet how long suffer- 
ing his God is. He made them 
coats of skins and clothed them, lest 
the thorns and thistles should tear 
their flesh. By the disobedience of 
this one man sin entered into the 
world and death by sin and so death 
has passed upon all men for that 
all have sinned and now the whole 
race is utterly unworthy of the 
least of God's mercies. And yet 
He bestowed His very greatest fa- 
vor in that he has provided in Jesus 
Christ who is one with His Father 
for the eternal salvation of sinners. 
And though sinners are exceeding 



sinful, Jesus is able to save even to 
the uttermost all that come to God 
by him. As Adam had all needful 
things in the garden together with 
communion with his Creator and 
yet sinned, so we, though we have 
all fullness in Christ who has cre- 
ated us anew, and walking in the 
spirit we have sweet fellowship with 
him. Yet we are so base as to sin 
in lusting after the things of the 
world. And as Israel of old, our 
sins separate between us and our 
God. But oh, listen, Jesus says of 
the Shepherd that has an hundred 
sheep and one has gone astray. He 
goes into the wilderness and search- 
es for it till he find it, and laying it 
on his shoulder and brings it home, 
for it is not his will that even one 
of his shall perish. 

Over and over again this Saviour 
proves his unchanging love for his 
bride, and each individual member 
of his body in convicting us of sin, 
and bringing us to a confession of 
the same, also giving us evidence of 
para'Mi. -ihus reminding us tha: his 
mercy endureth forever. Are we 
not glad that our God is not as the 
God of the heathen, who has feet 
but walks not, hands but handles 
not, eyes but sees not, ears but 
hears not, mouth but speaks not. 
But he is the living God. He sees, 
hears, and speaks to his poor and 
needy ones, comes to them with his 
hands full of rich blessings for 
them even to the extent of giving 
them joy in tribulation, and when 
he comes, darkness, hunger, pain 
or even death cannot keep his saved 
child from rejoicing in him whose 
countenance is as the sun shineth in 
his strength. The saved are men 
and women of Adam's fallen race, 
and so see questions from different 
o:; sauii:}9uios pu'B *M8ta jo s:}uiod 



110 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



the point of falling out and non- 
fellowshiping each other, but 
when they talk of what the Lord 
has done for them, each abiding in 
his calling, then they agree, and 
love each other for Jesus sake. We 
have been blessed to keep very well 
so far this winter and while all 
tings are not as we would have 
them, we feel that we have much to 
be thankful for. We hope you are 
well and enjoying needful blessings. 

Sister Mamie and I wish to be re- 
membered to Uncle Henry and 
Uncle Charlie and also the aunties, 
and all who you think would care 
to hear from us. The children are 
doing well. 

Your brother in hope, 
JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



Danville, Va. 

Elder J. T. Rowe, 
Dear Brother: 

Will now write a little as I wish 
to have your good letter to me pub- 
lished in Landmark that others may 
enjoy it, also have been reading of 
The Children and The Children's 
Bread, recorded in 7th chapter of 
Mark, where a certain woman ask- 
ed Jesus to cast a devil out of her 
daughter, when he says, let the 
children first be filled, for it is not 
meet to take the children's bread 
and cast it to the dogs. Now, 
my dear brother, Jesus, when on 
earth spoke of his dear ones as 
children, sheep, lambs and so on. 
Who are they, and how shall we 
know them. Jesus knows them, 
has his mark upon them, and will 
feed and care for them, but what 
troubles us, are we one of them. 
Wewant some evidence that we be- 
long to the fold. I am thinking 



now of P. D. Gold and P. G. Lester, 
and of the present editors of Land- 
mark, and if I know my own heart 
I do love them. I believe for Jesus' 
sake and I am so glad of it. For 
this cause you know you have pass- 
ed from death unto life, because 
you love the brethren. I feel the 
children and the people in and 
around Danville are in great dis- 
tress caused by the drought and 
strike in the cotton mills that give 
employment to many of our people. 
Just think when the crops are de- 
stroyed nothing from the farms and 
then no pay roll from the mills, and 
then nearly every family is afflict- 
ed with flu. So many deaths, es- 
pecially of the aged. These trou- 
bles have put us to thinking, and 
we want to know what shall we do. 
We want some place of refuge, 
some where to hide from the storm. 

Brethren, let us take the matter 
to the Lord in prayer and have no 
confidence in the flesh. Remem- 
ber the prophet prayed that it might 
not rain, and it rained not for three 
years and six months, and he pray- 
ed again and the rain came. If the 
Lord give us the spirit of prayer, 
then at the Lord's time, the chil- 
dren will be fed. He doeth all 
things well, enables us to speak and 
hear. 

We remember Jesus multiplying 
the few loaves and fishes and feed- 
ing thousands and some left. Is He 
not the same God our father's wor- 
shipped? All povv^er is slill with 
him, and we believe the children 
will be cared for world without end. 

Your brother in hope of meeting 
you when all our trials and troubles 
are over. _ 
R. L. DODSON, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



111 



ELDKR W. A. GOURLEY 

Elder William Alfred Gourley was born 
in Rockingham county, NoVth Carolina on 
October 16, 1849 and departed this life 
on July 29, 1930. His time on earth was 
80 years, nine months and 13 days. He 
was married to Amy F. Turner in 1876 
and to their union were born ten children, 
six boys and four girls One died an in- 
fant and nine lived to be grown. Two 
daughters and one son preceded him to 
the grave in the bloom of life, while four 
sons and two daughters and his wife re- 
main to bear our grief and mourn the loss 
of our father. Yet God is too good to be 
unkind and too wise to err, so the Lord 
giveth and the Lord taketh away. Bless- 
ed be the name of the Lord. The chil- 
dren that remain are: D. L. Gourley, J. S., 
P. H., W. A., Jr., Mrs. Lillie Conner and 
Mrs. Grace Fulp. He also leaves 28 
grandchildren. 

Elders A. J. Fagg and S. H. Reid preach- 
ed his funeral in Sardis church in the 
midst of a large gathering of friends and 
loved ones. They both spoke in the high- 
est terms of father and by the many pre- 
cious and consoling thoughts they convey- 
ed I feel they will go with us to the grave. 
He was laid to rest in Sardis cemetery, at 
the church he loved. 

Father and mother joined the Primitive 
Baptist church at Sardis in 1881. Father 
served the church as clerk for many years. 
About 1905 or 1906 the church ordained 
him to the full ministry of the gospel to 
which he remained faithful to the end. I 
believe he could say "I have fought a good 
fight and have kept the faith and am now 
ready to be offered up." His life was an 
orderly walk and of a Godly conversation. 
His advice and example to his children 
and neighbor's children and to all whom 
he came in contact with was the heights 
and happiness of morality in the fear and 
admonition of the Lord. His motto was, 
"Seek ye first the kingdom of God and His 
righteousness." So may the grace of God 
lead us in the right way while we journey 
in this body of sin and death, so that when 
the summons comes we can say "it Is good 
to die." 

I hope our sorrowful parting here on 
(^arth is perfectly right and best and may 
(h's way of pain and grief we go through 
lead us to a home of rest 

Written by his sorrowing son, 
James S. Gourley, 
Route No. 2, Reidsville, N. C. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas it pleased God in His infinite 
wisdom to remove from us by death our 
beloved brother and Deacon, W. M. Dur- 
ham, therefore be it resolved: 

First, that we, believing our loss is his 
eternal gain, desire to bow in humble sub- 
misf5ion to an all wise God. 



Second, that we extend to his beloved 
family and friends our love and sympathy, 
desiring that the good God will comfort 
and sustain them. 

Third, that a copy of this resolution be 
sent to the family of the deceased, a copy 
to Zion's Landmark and to the Advocate 
and Messenger for publication and a copy 
recorded on our Church Book. 

Written by order of Mt. Zion Church in 
conference, Saturday before fourth Sunday 
in November, 1930. 

Elder Xure Lee, Moderator, 

R. D. Langdon, Clerk. 

Ella Whittenton, 

J. M. Whittenton, 

Clida Langdon, Committee. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 
BROTHER G. P. ALLEN 

Resolutions of respect of our dearly be- 
loved brother, and deacon G. P. Allen, who 
departed this life November 16th, 1930. 

Whereas we feel that in his passing that 
the church has lost a faithful member and 
deacon, and the family a good, wise and 
Instructive father and husband. 

Therefore be it resolved. 

First, That the church at Wheelers bow 
In humble submission to the will of our 
heavenly Father that doeth all things well 
that is too wise to err and too good to be 
unkind. 

Though we feel that we will miss his 
presence, we also feel our loss is his eter- 
nal gain. 

Second, That the church at Wheelers ex- 
tend to the bereaved family their heartfelt 
sympathy hoping that the God of all grace 
will comfort them and cause them to fee' 
that he is resting from his labors and that 
his works will follow him. 

Third, That a copy of these resolutions 
be spread on our church records, a copy 
be sent to the bereaved family, and a copy 
be sent to Zion's Landmark for publica- 
tion. 

Done by order of church in conference, 
December meeting 1930. 

Elder B. F. McKinney, Mod. 
F. L. Moore, Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT FOR 
SISTER LIZZIE SMITH. 

Whereas, it has pleased Almighty God 
to visit our little flock and call from us 
our dear sister, Lizzie Smith, who was 
born July 3, 1861, and died Dec. 31, 1930, 
making her stay on earth 69 years, 5 
months and 27 days. Sister Lizzie Smith 
was married to Mr. A. E. Smith, December 
19, 1888, and to this union were born 7 
children, and two preceded her to the 
grave. She leaves to mourn their loss 
her husband, A. E. Smith, three sons, 
Claude, Marlon and Oscar of Roberson- 
ville, N. C, and two daughters, Mrs. T. J. 
Robinson of Robersonville, Mrs. F. F. Cox 



112 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



of Winterville, N. C, and several grand 
children and a host of relatives and 
friends. She united with the church at 
Robersonville, N. C, the fourth Sunday, 
April, 1910, and was baptized by Eld. M. 
F. Lawrence. 

Resolved, first, It's with a sad heart we 
record her death. 

Resolved, second, that we send a copy 
to the Zion's Landmark for publication 
and same be spread on our church record. 

Done by order of Conference Saturday 
before the 1st Sunday in June, 1931. 
HATTIE ROSS, 
IDA E. BARNHILL, 

Committee for the church at 
Robersonvile, N. C. 



MRS. EASTER PAGE PARTIN, 

We, the church at Middle Creek wish 
to write a short sketch of the life and 
passing, in memory of our departed sis- 
ter, Easter Page Partin, who died from 
the infirmities of old age, on the fourth 
of November, 1930, in the eighty-fifth 
year of her age; at the home of her 
daughter, Mrs. Honeycutt, at Angier, N. C, 
with whom she had made her home sev- 
eral years. She united with the church 
at Sandy Grove in Johnson County, Sep- 
tember 15, 1877, and upon her request 
was granted a letter of dismission March 
16, 190 7, and was received by letter into 
Middle Creek Church, Wake County, April 
meeting, 1907. 

Sister Partiu's husband, J. H. Partin, 
preceded her to the grave, leaving her a 
widow many years and the mother of sev- 
eral children. She was a woman of noble 
traits, and endeavored to fulfill the du- 
ties of wife and mother, with becoming 
honor. She was a strong believer in the 
doctrine of salvation by grace, and satis- 
fied with the goodness of the Lord's 
house, and to be a peaceable, quiet mem- 
ber, a much coveted virtue. 

Sister Partin was useful and especially 
gifted in administering to the sick and 
needy, seemed to understand remedies to 
apply to relieve suffering, and she gave 
unstintingly to humanity of her knowledge 
and strength in this way, and we hope 
and believe she is now receiving plaudits 
of the faithful in Christ Jesus the Lord. 

Done by order of conference. 

Elder E. C. Jones, Mod. 
J. B. Britt, Church Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas God in His infinite wisdom has 
seen fit to remove from us our beloved 
sister, Mary Leah, Oakley, wife of Zacha- 
riah Oakley, in October 1930, making her 
stay on earth 81 years; sister Oakley was a 
faithful member of the Church at Storeis 
Creek for many years, always filling her 
seat, if not providentially hindered. We de- 
sire to bow in humble submission to our 



heavenly Father, feeling that our loss is 
■her eternal gain. 

Therefore, be it resolved in the passing 
of sister Oakley, the church at Storeis 
Creek has lost a faithful member, her hus- 
band and children a faithful and loving 
wife and mother, may the God of all 
grace comfort the bereaved family and her 
many brethren, sisters and friends. We 
desire that a copy of these resolutions be 
spread on our church record, and a copy 
sent to Zion's Landmark for publication. 
Done by order of the church in conference 
at January meeting. 

Elder L. J. Chandler, Mod. 
Ed Clayton, Clerk. 



LOWER COUNTRY LINE UNION. 

The Lower Country Line Union -will be 
held the Lord willing, r/ith the church at 
Roxboro, N. C, on the fifth Sunday and 
Saturday before in March, 1931. Brethren 
and sisters and friends are cordially In- 
vited to come and be with us, especially 
ministers. 

A. P. CLAYTON, 

Union Clerk. 



NEXT SHILOH UNION 

"The next Shiloh union meets with the 
Primitive Baptist church in Spray, N. C, 
fifth Sunday in March, 1931. 

Meeting will commence on Saturday at 
2:30 P. M. 

Brethren invited to meet with us. 

D. V. SPANGLER, Union Clerk. 
Cascade, Va. 



UPPER COUNTRY LINE UNION. 

The next regular session of the Upper 
Country Line Union will be held the Lord 
willing, with Bush Arbor Church in Cas- 
well County, N. C. on the 5th Sunday and 
Saturday before in March, 1931. 

The public is cordially invited to attend 
this meeting, especially ministers. 

This church is located on No. 6 2 High- 
way leading from Haw River to Yancey- 
ville. Good hard surface road. 

W. C. KING, Union Clerk. 



APPOINTMENTS. 

Elder J. W. Gilliam and D. V. Spangler 
will fill the following appointments: 

Simpson Creek Saturday and Sunday, 
March 7th and 8th. 

Mill Branch, Sunday evening 2:30 P. M. 

Pleasant Hill Monday, Mar. 9th., 11 
A. M. 

Peedee, Tuesday, March 10th, 11 A. M. 
Black Creek Wednesday, 11th, 11 A. M. 
Tabor Wednesday night, 11th, 7:30 
P. M. 

Bethel, Thursday, 12th., 11 A. M. 

Pireway, Thursday, 12th, 2:30 P. M. 

Thanks, 

D. V. Spangler 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 



AT 



WILSON. NORTH CAROL ^_ ^ 
PRIMITIVE oR OLD SCHOOL BA^Ho'^T 



GOD REWARDS WOMAN FOR TAKING CARE OF HIS SERVANT. 

"And it fell on a day, that Elisha passed to Shunem, where was a great 
woman; and she constrained him to eat bread. And so it was, that as 
oft' as he passed by, he turned in thither to eat bread. 

And she said unto her husband. Behold now, I perceive that this is an 
holy man of God, which passeth by continually. 

Let us make a little chamber, I pray thee, on the wall; and let us set 
for him there a bed, and a table, and a stool, and a candlestick: and it 
shall be, when he cometh to us, that he shall turn in thither. And it fell 
on a day, that he came thither, and turned into the chamber and lay 
there. 

And he said to Gehazi, his servant. Call this Shunemite. And when 
he had called her, she stood before him. 

And he said unto him. Say now unto her. Behold, thou hast been care- 
ful for us with all this care; what is to be done for thee? Wouldst thou 
be spoken for to the king, or to the captain of the host? And she an- 
swered, I dwell among mine own people. 

And he said, What then is to be done for her? And Gehazi answered, 
verily she hath no child, and her husband is old. 

And he said. Call her. And when he had called her, she stood in the 
door. And he said. About this season, according to the time of life, thou 
Shalt embrace a son, and she said, Nay, my Lord, thou man of God, do 
not lie unto thine handmaid. 

And the woman conceived, and bare a son at that season, that Elisha 
had said unto her, according to the time of life." — 2 Kings 4:8-17. 



VOL. LXIV. 



MARCH 1, 1931 




ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor 



Winston-Salem, N. C. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 



ELDER M. L. GILBERT 
ELDER S. B. DENNY __ 
ELDER J. T. ROWE ___ 



Dade City, Fla. 

Wilson, N. C. 
Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE I 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let hira send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuli are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



2)epote& to the Cause of S^esus Cbdst 



"ONLY JONATHAN AND DAVID 
KNEW THE MATTER." 
1 Samuel 20:39. 

The friendship of Jonathan and 
David, as portrayed in the scrip- 
tures, is wonderful; it is so touch- 
ingly beautiful. David slew the 
Philistine champion, Goliath, the 
giant king of Gath, and Abner took 
David and brought him before Saul 
with the head of the Philistine in 
his hand. And Saul said unto him, 
Whose son art thou, thou young 
man? And David answered, I am 
the son of thy servant Jesse, the 
Bethlehemite. And it came to pass 
when he had made an end of speak- 
ing unto Saul, that the soul of Jona- 
than was knit Avith the soul of 
David, and Jonathan loved him as 
his own soul. And Saul took him 
that day, and would let him go no 
more home to his father's house. 
Then Jonathan and David made a 
covenant, because he loved him as 
his own soul. And Jonathan strip- 
ped himself of the robe that was up- 
on him, and gave it to David, and 
his garments, even to his sword, 
and to his bow, and to his girdle." 
I Samuel 18:1-4. Years after this, 
when Saul and Jonathan were slain 
in battle, at the close of his lamen- 
tation over them David pours forth 
his heart and exclaims: "How are 
the mighty fallen in the midst of 
the battle! O Jonathan, thou wast 
slain in thine high places. I am 
distressed for thee, my brother 
Jonathan: very pleasant hast thou 



been unto me : thy love to me was 
wonderful, passing the love of wo- 
men. How are the mighty fallen, 
and the weapons of war perished!" 
2 Samuel 1:25-27. 

So, in the twentieth chapter of 
1st Samuel, we have portrayed, in 
scenes most dramatic, the loves of 
Jonathan and David. Saul, King 
of Israel, in his envious hatred 
sought to slay David, and David in 
consequence fled from the face of 
Saul. But he and Jonathan met 
and discoursed with one another 
over the trying providences that had 
come iipon the slayer of Goliath, 
the Philistine. I need not repeat 
the story, read it for yourselves. 
Jonathan promises, if he assuredly 
finds that King Saul, his father, is 
set upon David's destruction, he 
will let David know, and this was 
the agreement between them con- 
cerning this matter. "Then Jona- 
than said to David, Tomorrow is 
the new moon: and thou shalt be 
missed, because thy seat will be 
empty. And when thou hast stay- 
ed three days, then thou shalt go 
down quickly, and come to the place 
where thou didst hide thyself when 
the business was in hand, and thou 
shalt remain by the stone Ezel. And 
I will shoot three arrows on the 
side thereof as though I shot at a 
mark. And, behold, I will send a 
lad, saying, Go, find out the arrows. 
If I expressly say unto the lad. Be- 
hold the arrows are on this side of 
thee, take them; then come thou: 



114 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



for thore is peace to thee, and no 
hurt; as the Lord liveth. But if I 
say thus unto the young man, Be- 
hold, the arrows are beyond thee; 
go thy way : for the Lord hath sent 
thee away. And as touching the 
matter which thou and I have 
spoken of, behold, the Lord be be- 
tween thee and mo forever." 

Jonathan soon found out that his 
father was determined to slay 
David. Jonathan fasted and grieved 
for David because his father had 
done this shame. "And it came to 
pass in the morning, that Jonathan 
went to the field at the time ap- 
pointed with David, and a little lad 
with him. AnH he said unto the 
lad, Run, find out now the arrows 
which I shoot. And as the lad ran, 
he shot an arrow beyond him. And 
when the lad was come to the place 
of the arrow which Jonathan had 
shot, Jonathan cried after the lad, 
and said, "Is not the arrow beyond 
thee? And Jonathan cried after 
the lad, make speed, haste, stay not. 
And Jonathan's lad gathered up 
the arrows, and came to his master. 
But the lad knew not anything : only 
Jonathan and David knew the mat- 
ter. And Jonathan gave his artil- 
lery unto his lad, and said unto him. 
Go, carry them to the city. And as 
soon as the lad was gone, David 
arose out of a place toward the 
south, and fell on his face to the 
ground, and bowed himself three 
times: and they kissed one another, 
and wept one with another, until 
David exceeded. And Jonathan 
said to David, Go in peace, foras- 
much as we have sworn both of us 
in the name of the Lord, saying, 
The Lord be between me and thee, 
and between my seed and thy seed 
forever. And he arose and depart- 
ed: and Jonathan went into the 



city." All this covenant and its 
tokens and transactions were be- 
tween Jonathan and David; there 
were no eavesdropper, no tell-tale 
spy, no intruder, no one that had 
knowledge of the covenant between 
them. The lad with his nimble feet 
sought out and gathered the ar- 
rows, and came to his master. "But 
the lad knew not anything: only 
Jonathan and David knew the mat- 
ter." 

"You only have I known of all 
the families of the earth." Amos 
3 :2. As others are strangers and 
foreigners, with whom the Lord has 
no friendship. They are his enemies, 
alienated from the life of God 
through the ignorance that is in 
them because of the blindness of 
their hearts. The sworn covenant 
of ceaseless friendship with all its 
tokens only Jonathan and David 
knew, the lad knew not anything. 

Now, in the highest aspect let us 
view the matter, that is, the matter 
between Christ and his church. As 
only Jonathan and David knew the 
matter, so the matter between 
Christ and his church is only known 
by them, all others are utterly out- 
side, (Mark 4:11) and like the lad, 
they know not anything of the mat- 
ter. The matter between Christ 
and the church is of eternal import- 
ance, and happy are they that know 
the matter. There are multitudes 
who imagine they know the matter, 
but if Christ is not dwelling in our 
hearts by faith we know not any- 
thing. God hath called us unto the 
fellowship of his Son, Jesus Christ 
our Lord, and all carnal professions 
and hypocrites with their feigned 
faith and dissembled love and lip 
service are outside the matter. 
Christ says, "I will sup with him, 
and he with me." Rev. 3:20. This 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



115 



is union and communion, blessed 
intimacy. "When they were alone, 
he expounded all things to his dis- 
ciples." Mark 4 :34. 

To them it was given to know the 
mysteries of the kingdom of heaven, 
but to them that were without it 
was not given. Very frequently 
the children of God find their com- 
munion with Jesus interrupted, for 
so much intrudes itself between 
them and their beloved Savior. 

Jesus knows this, and Ah! we 
amidst our conflicts and burdens 
know it, too. But Christ can put 
an end of our apartness from him- 
self. How kindly he speaks in 
Mark 6:31-32. "He said unto them, 
"Come ye yourselves apart into a 
desert place, and rest avv^hile: for 
there were many coming and going, 
and they had no leisure so much as 
to eat. And they departed into a 
desert place by ship privately." 
There they are alone; they rest and 
eat and hold communion with Jesus. 
All around them is the desert; the 
one green spot, the oasis in this 
desert, is Jesus and his own resting, 
eating, and in intimate discourse to- 
gether. The world knows not any- 
thing of this; only Christ and his 
loved ones know the matter. 

Truly there is something of a di- 
vine secrecy between Christ and 
poor perishing sinners who are call- 
ed unto fellowship with him. He 
manifests himself unto them as he 
does not unto the world. "At that 
day ye shall know that I am in my 
Father, and ye in me, and I in you." 
"The love of Jesus, what it is none 
but his loved ones know." "For 
the Lord's portion in his people; 
Jacob is the lot of his inheritance. 
He found him in a desert land, and. 
in a waste howling wilderness; he 
led him about, he instructed him, he 



kept him as the apple of his eye. As 
an eagle stirreth up her nest, flut- 
tereth over her young, spreadeth 
abroad her wings, taketh them, 
beareth them on he'r wings: so the 
Lord alone did lead him, and there 
was no strange god with him." 
Deut. 32:9-12. From all our idols 
our God will cleanse us. Those 
who are called by his grace are so 
led about and taught of him that 
they are made to cast away all false 
gods, all vain confidences, all lying 
doctrines of men and devils. We 
find in the wilderness they fail to 
yield us sustenance, they can do us 
no good, they are miserable com- 
forters. 

God in our experiences of his 
teaching famishes all the gods of 
the earth, we cast them to the moles 
and to the bats, and the Lord alone 
is exalted in that day. Isaiah 2 :20. 
O how gracious is the Lord that we 
are led again and again to look to 
Christ our salvation, everything 
else is renounced, Jesus only can 
succor us, and so in our faith in Him 
we are coming up from the wilder- 
ness leaning upon Him alone. 
Solomon's Song 8:5. 'Only Jona- 
than and David knew the matter." 
There are many instances given us 
in the Scriptures setting forth the 
personal relations of Christ and his 
people. Let us look at a few *of 
these; perhaps in them we may see 
our experimental oneness with 
Jesus displayed. Look at the 
dreadful yet sacred scene presented 
in John 8:3-11. There comes a 
company of men, scribes and Phari- 
sees. I suppose they profess them- 
selves to be gentlemen. There is a 
woman in their midst, they are 
bringing her with them, a wretched 
prisoner, whom they have taken in 
adultery in the very act. Poor 



116 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



wretched woman! They bring this 
sinful one before the Son of God. 
There she stands, an adulteress. 
They said unto Jesus, "Master, this 
woman was taken in adultery, in 
the very act. Now Moses in the 
law commanded us, that such 
should be stoned: but what sayest 
thou? This they sa:."!, tempting him, 
that they might have to accuse 
him." Why did t'ley not drag the 
equally guilty man also before 
Jesus? Moses commanded that "the 
adulterer and the adulteress shall 
surely be put to death." Lev. 20:10. 
O the contemptibly cowardlyhypo- 
crites! She has no advocate to 
plead her cause, no one to pity her 
in that crowd; they are all her ac- 
cusers, and she answers them not. 
She does not attempt to palliate her 
offense by putting the blame upon 
the adulterer; she has no word to 
speak in her own defense, she is a 
sinner, and dumb. She knows 
what Moses' law saith concerning 
her, but what will the sentence be 
from the lips of Jesus? King Lem- 
uel in his prophecy that his mother 
taught him said, "Open thy mouth 
for the dumb in the cause of all such 
as are appointed to destruction." 
Prov. 31 :8. But there is no mouth 
opened in behalf of this sinner. 
"Jesus stooped down, and with his 
finger wrote on the ground, as 
though he heard them not" Was it 
her death sentence he wrote with 
his finger? O no. I am sure none 
of her accusers knew what he 
wrote, I do not know. Jesus knew 
what he wi'ote, and perhaps this 
sinful woman with her down cast 
eyes also knew the matter. "So 
when they continued asking Him, 
He lifted up Himself, and said unto 
them. He that is without sin among 
you, let him first cast a stone at 



her. And again he stooped down, 
and wrote on the ground." What 
Jesus wrote was surely for some one 
to read. Shall I say that the wo- 
man read what his finger wrote on 
the ground? May I say that only 
the woman and Jesus knew the 
matter? Christ did not come to 
destroy Moses' law. If Moses can 
stone her let her be stoned. The 
accusers, these professed witnesses 
of her guilt, who apprehended her 
in the very act of adultery, let them 
stone her. Jesus saith, "He that is 
without sin among you, let him first 
cast a stone at her." What silence 
there is in this court! No voice is 
heard. Their accusations are end- 
ed, they can say no more on that 
head. Not a dog shall move his 
tongue against this woman; they 
cease their barking. Exod. 11:7. 

No one takes hold of the guilty 
one to lead her forth to be stoned 
to death ; not one of them has any 
power to cast a stone at her. She 
is a "vessel of mercy," even though 
the law would show her none. But 
her accusers know not anything of 
this, and the woman as yet does 
not know the matter. "And again 
he stooped down, and wrote on the 
ground." While Jesus is writing 
on the ground, the prisoner, the 
woman stands there in her shame; 
and was not Jesus doing some writ- 
ing in this sinful woman's heart? 
The witnesses, her accusers, are 
leaving the court. They are all 
guilty, Christ knew them, they can- 
not stand before him. His uplifted 
face was upon them while he spake 
unto them. Ah, wretched men, 
they cannot look Jesus in the face. 
As the Egyptians, when the Lord 
looked upon them through the pil- 
lar of fire and of cloud, were trou- 
bled and fled. Exod. 14:24, so 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



117 



these scribes and pharisees, hypo- 
crites, when they heard what Christ 
said, being convicted by their own 
consciences, went out one by one, 
beginning at the eldest, even unto 
the last, and Jesus was left alone, 
and the woman standing in the 
midst. "When Jesus had lifted up 
himself, and saw none but the wo- 
man, he said unto her. Woman, 
where are those thine accusers? 
Hath no man condemned thee? She 
said, No man. Lord." The accusers 
are gone, the last one has left. Will 
Jesus accuse her? Will the holy 
child Jesus condemn her, cast the 
first stone at her? O what will He 
say to her, what will He do? It is 
now altogether a matter between 
Jesus and the sinful woman. All 
her accusers have had to give her 
case up to Jesus. "Jesus was left 
alone, and the woman standing in 
the midst." When Jesus lifted 
up Himself and saw none but the 
woman, did he look upon her with 
loathing? Was his face severe? 
Did she read her just doom in his 
looks? He said, "Hath no man con- 
demned thee? She said. No man. 
Lord." All the hateful, hypocriti- 
cal faces of her accusers are gone, 
net one of them is to be seen. 
Jesus sees none but the woman, and 
her eyes see none but Jesus; and 
while he looks upon her and she 
looks in his face, the lips of Jesus 
say, "Neither do I condemn thee: 
go, and sin no more." What court, 
what judge is this that sets the pris- 
oner free? This is not the court of 
the law of Moses, of the old cove- 
nant. For he that despised Moses' 
law died without mercy under two 
or three witnesses, Heb. 10:28. But 
Moses and Moses law are not pres- 
ent now, they have withdrawn. Un- 
ler the law this sinful v/omnn found 



only condemnation, it was the min- 
istration of death; but she now 
stands in another court, and before 
another Judge. This Judge is 
Jesus, the Son of God, the Mediator 
of the new covenant. This is the 
tribunal of our blessed Emmanuel, 
this is the throne of God and the 
Lamb. Here justice and judgment 
inhabit the throne, and mercy and 
truth go before his face; righteous- 
ness and peace have kissed each 
other. This woman stands before 
the throne of grace, and Jesus, the 
glorious Head of Grace, sits upon 
the throne. He is our Lawgiver, 
he is our judge, he is our king, and 
he will save to the uttermost all that 
come unto God by him. He will 
show mercy unto the foulest trans- 
gressors that are brought before 
his seat; for Christ is the end of the 
law for righteousness to every one 
that believeth in him. 0 the bless- 
edness ! The law of the Spirit of Life 
in Christ Jesus makes us free from 
the law of sin and death. This poor 
sinner before Jesus is now to ex- 
perience that she is not under the 
aw, not under its curse, but under 
the reign of grace in Christ Jesus; 
and though her sins have abounded, 
grace doth much more abound ; and 
that as sin hath reigned unto death, 
even so shall grace reign through 
righteousness unto eternal life 
through Jesus Christ our Lord. 
This woman has felt the terrors of 
the law, its curse was announced 
and the sentence passed upon her. 
Even Jesus said, "He that is with- 
out sin among you, first cast a stone 
at her." Christ has no quarrel 
with Moses' law, but there is no one 
to cast the first stone at this sinner. 
Christ is her Saviour, He came into 
the world to save sinners, to die for 
the nnTodlv. and from his lips 



118 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



comes unto this poor sinner the 
judgment (not of the law of Moses, 
but of God in the everlasting cove- 
nant of redemption), and this is 
what the woman heard from Jesus' 
lips, "Go, and sin no more." His 
lips are like lilies dropping sweet 
smelling myrrh, his mouth is most 
sweet. His words dropped into her 
aching heart. They were words of 
heavenly balm, words of pardoning 
love, words that set the prisoner 
free in justification of life. O 
Christ thou hast the words of eter- 
nal life, and this woman lives upon 
the words of Jesus' lips. The out- 
siders know not anything, only 
Jesus and the woman knew the mat- 
ter, "Go, and sin no more." A par- 
doned sinner goes forth. The Son 
of God hath set the prisoner free, 
and she is free indeed. "Who shall 
lay anything to the charge of God's 
elect? It is God that justifieth, 
who is he that condemneth? It is 
Christ that died, yea rather, that is 
risen again, who is even at the right 
hand of God, who also maketh in- 
tercession for us. Not one of Moses 
witnesses accosts her, not an accu- 
sation is hurled at her, not a finger 
of scorn is pointed at her, not a look 
of loathing is cast upon her, for she 
is justified freely by Jehovah's 
grace through the redemption that 
is in Christ Jesus. Go, and sin no 
more." O how those words were 
cherished in her heart. All her 
days Jesus' dear face, his eyes of 
pardoning grace were before her, 
his mouth so kind, so sweet, was 
ever saying to her, "Sin no more." 
Only she and the Saviour knew this 
matter. 

The apostle Peter while in the 
garden of Gethsemane was a valiant 
defender of Christ, and would have 
slain any one who would lay a fin- 



ger upon him, and did with his 
sword cut off the right ear of the 
high priest's servant, "The servants 
name was Malchus." John 18:10. 
But as Peter warms himself at the 
fire, in the palace of the high priest, 
when a maid challenges him, and 
accuses him of being one of Christ's 
disciples, where Peter, is thy brav- 
ery? There he is denying Jesus, 
denying him with oaths and curses. 
Are you, child of God, saying I 
would never have done that? O 
there is the precious Saviour know- 
ing, hearing all that Peter is, and 
is saying. Yes, amidst the revil- 
ings, mockings, insults, cruelties to 
which Jesus was subjected he has 
thoughts of Peter and turned and 
looked upon Peter. Only Jesus and 
Peter knew all this matter. When 
their eyes met, and Peter remem- 
bers that word, "Before the cock 
crows twice, thou shalt deny me 
thrice." What took place in those 
moments only Jesus and Peter 
knew, the rest, that wicked throng, 
knew not anything. That look! 
Was it a look of scorn, of utter 
loathing? O no! Words cannot 
portray what was in that look; it 
passes all telling. It went all 
through him ; so transformed the 
denying, cursing Peter. He leaves 
the fire where he was warming him- 
self; he went out a broken hearted, 
contrite sinner. "Peter went out 
and wept bitterly." Luke 22:62. 

Only Jesus and Peter knew this 
matter. 

Very many instances are given us 
in the scriptures of the intimacy be- 
tween the Lord and his chosen ones, 
as between the crucified thief and 
the Saviour. To this dying thief 
was given a vision that the cruci- 
fied Christ Jesus was the king of 
glory, the Lord of hosts, the King of 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



119 



Israel, through his sufferings, his 
blood his travail, entering his King- 
dom, soon to ascend into the 
heavens, and he is moved to cry, 
"Lord remember me when thou 
comest into thy kingdom. And 
Jesus said unto him, Verily, I say 
unto thee. Today shalt thou be v^ith 
me in paradise," Luke 3:42-43. 
Only the crucified Jesus Christ and 
this crucified thief knew this mat- 
ter ; that reviling mob knew not any- 
thing. When Saul of Tarsus was 
on his way to Damascus, and a light 
shone round about him above the 
brightness of the sun, and he fell to 
the earth, and heard a voice saying 
unto him, in the Hebrew tongue, 
Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou 
me? And he said. Who art thou 
Lord? And the Lord said, I am 
Jesus whom thou persecutest: it is 
hard for thee to kick against the 
pricks. Only Jesus and Saul of Tar- 
sus knew the matter, to the men 
that journeyed with him it was 
meaningless, they knew not any- 
thing. Acts 9:1-7. There are fre- 
quent experiences, dear children of 
God that are ours, between our God 
and our souls, so personal of which 
it can be described in the saying, 
"The lad knew not anything, only 
Jonathan and David knew the 
matter." 

FREDERICK W. KEENE, 
501 Cleveland Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

(A sketch of sermon preached 
by me at the Black Creek Associa- 
tion, October, 1939. — F. W. Keene.) 



FEASTING ON GOOD THINGS. 

Elder M. L. Gilbert, 

Dade City, Fla. 
Dear brother in hope : 



As I am still feasting on the good 




from Heaven last Wednesday and 
Thursday and Saturday and Sunday 
through God's humble servants; 
and as it has been raining all of yes- 
terday and today and I am having 
to stay in, I have just got to do some- 
thing in praising My Heavenly Mas- 
ter. I told you Sunday that I had 
a letter that I wrote to you several 
month? ago and had never mailed 
it, because it was like me, so imper- 
fect that I felt that it was not worth 
your notice. But feeling the desire 
so strong to write to you, and tell 
you of the goodness of God and his 
mercy, which he has bestowed up- 
on me, a sinner, that it has become 
a burden, and so I must try, in order 
to relieve my mind, trusting that I 
shall not worry you or take up your 
valuable time for naught. 

When I arose this morning it just 
seemed to me that every thing un- 
der Heaven was praising God, and 
my whole soul was overflowed with 
his grace and love and I have been 
so happy and just wondering if 
every body was not filled the same 
way. I don't see how they could 
help being so, for it has been so 
bright to me. I am like the poet 
that wrote, 

"Sweet rivers of redeeming love. 
Lie just before mine eyes, 
Had I the pinions of a dove, 
I'd to those rivers rise, 
I'd rise superior to my pain. 
With joy outstrip the wind 
I'd cross bold Jordan's stormy 
main. 

And leave this world behind." 

Yes if it could have been possible 
this morning I would have just liked 
to have gone out and met with some 
of God's humble poor and talked 
Avith them of the good things that T 



120 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



could see. I just wanted to sing his 
praise. Brother Gilbert I feel so 
rich today, because I feel like God is 
my Father, and He has been so mer- 
ciful to me all along through life's 
uneven ways, yet I am so poor in 
this world's goods, but today I 
feel like I could just sell my clothes 
off my back and give it to the poor 
and go on praising and following 
Jesus. 

Your sermon on Saturday was so 
gracious to a sinner like me, it 
seemed that it was for me only. Oh 
you told of that God that I love, the 
one who has all power in Heaven 
and earth, who in love works all 
things after the counsel of His own 
will. Yes, He works and none can 
hinder. He hinders and none can 
work; he opens and none can shut, 
shuts and none can open. It is so 
wonderful the way he has led you 
all through life and has manifested 
himself to you so many times, he 
has been your head and stay, your 
guide, your light and liberty. Oh, 
such a good humble servant he has 
made of you, a shepherd to go in 
and out before the sheep, a work- 
man that needeth not to be ashamed 
rightly dividing the word of Truth. 
I thank God through our Lord and 
Saviour Jesus Christ that he has en- 
abled you through grace divine to 
take heed of his commands and fol- 
low Jesus through duty and 
through trials too, always going at 
his command, comforting and con- 
soling his humble poor, yet I do 
know of a truth that some times 
you have been cast down and felt 
that there was nothing for you felt 
that God was not in the matter. It 
was at these times that you felt that 
your burden was more than you 
could bear, and you felt like just 
turninor back and civincr up. Oh the 



travailing pain, the untold agony 
that you have suffered and God 
only knew it, and he was the only 
one that could remove such bur- 
dens, but Oh how good it was when 
you got to his banqueting house and 
met with the saints and there Jesus 
made one in your midst. Oh then 
that light shone around you, the 
brightness of which was above the 
brightness of the noon day sun, 
every particle of darkness was then 
removed and every thing seemed to 
praise God, then you could see the 
love of God manifested. Yes, you 
have so many times been made to 
rejoice with the saints when love 
was flowing from breast to breast 
and from heart to heart, and you 
could return to your home, to your 
dear companion and children re- 
joicing in peace, feeling then that 
God's humble poor had been com- 
forted, fed on the bread of life and 
watered with the distilled dews 
from on high. 

The circumstance that you told 
us of last Saturday that happened 
to you many years ago when your 
child was stricken with fever and 
was so dangerously ill, and you had 
to leave him to go to your appoint- 
ment God was so good to you, so 
merciful. Oh the love he had for 
yoM, and his power he made mani- 
fest to you there. Oh how he was 
able to bless you and restore your 
child both at the same hour, al- 
though you were so many miles 
apart. My brother and father in 
Israel, this did strengthen me so 
much. It bears me up in my own 
trials, and the love and mercy he 
showed to me only last year in my 
afflictions. It just makes me feel 
like Jesus is here with me today 
with his healing balm, and I don't 
feel it but I know it. T kn(nv he did 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



121 



for you just what you said, and it 
does not look like that we would 
ever have reason to doubt again, 
but we do, it is so easy to give away 
to the flesh. But satan is ever on 
the job and is showing us so many 
of the beauties of this world and 
telling us like he told Jesus, all this 
will I give unto thee if only thou 
will fall down and worship me; and 
you know Brother Gilbert this fel- 
low is so cunning, he does us just 
like he did Jesus. He even quotes 
us Scripture, and sometimes we are 
so weak that we are unable to 
discern the difference; we have not 
the power that Jesus had, because 
He had all power and He knew the 
devil, and having that power and 
knowledge, could say get behind me 
Satan ; for it is written. Thou shalt 
worship God and Him only shalt 
thou serve. Oh such a wonderful 
Saviour, such a powerful God. He 
turns the earth upside down and 
scatters the inhabitants abroad, 
this is just what He did there. Oh 
the principles of the flesh warring 
against the spirit and bringing us 
into captivity to the law of sin, but 
how sweet it is, when we are able 
through the spirit to mortify the 
deeds of the body, and live, live in 
peace and fellowship with God, 
I am able to cry Abba Father; but 
so many times I am only able to say 
0 God, have mercy on me a sinner. 
It is so sweet when I can sing, 

"Amazing grace, how sweet the 
sound. 

That saved a wretch like me, 

I once was lost, but now am found 

Was blind, but now 1 see." 

and then we are made able to say 
in_praise and thanksgiving, to God 



"Through many dangers, toils and 

snares 
We have already come, 
'Tis grace has brought me safe 

thus far 
And grace will lead me home." 

Oh that home? Eternal, in Heaven, 
where Jesus is now on the right 
hand of God, the Father, making 
intercessions for the Saints. Yes, 
He is now making preparations to 
carry his redeemed home to glory, 
where they will for ever and ever 
sing praise to his holy name. Oh 
that home that blessed home where 
there will be no trials, no sin, no 
rain or snow, no death, no parting, 
but all will be joy, peace, thanks- 
giving, praise and glory without 
end. What a blessed thought, 
Brother Gilbert; 

"When we've been there ten thous- 
and years. 
Bright shining as the Sun, 
We've no less days to sing God's 
praise 

Than when we first begun." 

Oh, it seems incomprehensible to 
think of that Heavenly place that 
is without end, where the redeemed 
of God will shine as the stars. When 
we awake in his likeness we SHALL 
be SATISFIED. Oh Brother Gil- 
bert, won't that be Heaven? when 
we get there and meet all the re- 
deemed of God? and they all 
crowned with a crown of righteous- 
ness and have on those robes that 
have been washed in the blood of 
the Lamb and made whiter than 
snow, there to see Jesus as He is 
and be like Him. 

Brother Gilbert, I so often think 
of the poor little children of God 
who are wandering on the outside 



122 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



of the fold, who have received the 
implantation of life, yet they feel 
their unworthiness to come into 
the sheepfold and commune with 
the saints, I so often see them at 
the house of God, when the Gospel 
is falling from the lips of God's 
humble servants, I see the tears 
streaming down their cheeks, and 
they weep bitterly because of un- 
worthy feelings. How good it 
would be for them to come on in to 
the Lord's table and eat and drink 
with the saints, and get down and 
wash their feet. Yes there are some, 
I believe, that are in search of the 
church of the living God, they have 
to seek, and the holy spirit leads to 
the street called strait, there they 
meet some Ananias and he preach- 
es Jesus to them and the scales fall 
from their eyes, then they can sing 
Amazing Grace, in spirit and in 
truth, that Salvation is of the Lord; 
"For by grace are ye saved through 
faith; and not of yourselves, it is 
the gift of God; not of works, lest 
any man should boast." I am so 
glad my brother, that it is by grace. 
I know you are, for that is what you 
have always preached, knowing 
nothing among the saints, save 
Jesus, and Him crucified, for our 
sins, and that is what I want; for in 
me dwelleth no good thing, I real- 
ize that I am nothing and worse 
than nothing and altogether vanity. 

Brother Gilbert, I fear that this 
is growing wearisome to you, and 
I know it is growing lengthy. But 
I have some more to say to you, 
precious brother, if you can allow 
me to claim this relationship with 
you. I esteem you as a follower of 
the Lamb, a true servant of the 
most high God, and as a father in 
Israel. While I know that you feel 
your unworthiness. But I must tell 



you my brother, that I know that 
you have fought a good fight, you 
have kept the faith once delivered 
to the saints, and there is a crown 
of righteousness laid up for you be- 
yond this vale of tears. 

Brother Gilbert, I want to beg 
you as a servant of the most high 
God, to pray for me and mine, oh 
will you pray with me that God may 
open my understanding of His word, 
will loose the seals and open the 
book to me? Pray that I may have 
light and liberty. 

Brother Gilbert, for some reason 
I have wanted to visit you and your 
church for several years, but have 
been deprived of that privilege, but 
I trust that I shall be able to do so 
in the near future. I think it would 
be so much pleasure to me, al- 
though I feel unworthy to be there 
for fear I have deceived you in the 
whole matter. 

And now to your dear compan- 
ion whom I have not yet mention- 
ed, I wish to say, I praise God for 
such humble sister, and mother in 
Israel, as she has been so kind to 
us down here, stayed home alone so 
many times while her dear husband 
has come to us as the breast of con- 
solation and brought to us glad 
tidings of great joy from on high, 
and if I am never permitted to meet 
her on this side again, I hope 
through grace divine to meet her 
in that sweet home of the soul 
where we will never grow old. God 
be with you all 'till we meet again. 
Unworthily yours in hope, 
Riley Campbell, 

Sarasota, Fla. 



HELPING OTHERS TO READ 
THE LANDMARK. 

We wish to acknowledge $1.00 
from Mrs. Nannie Phillips. Route P. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



123 



Dandridge, Tenn., for some sister 
unable to pay for Zion's Landmark, 
together with her renewal and a re- 
newal for a friend. 



ERRORS IN HIS ARTICLE. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 

Care Zion's Landmark Dept., 

Wilson, N. C. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

In the Landmark for January 1, 
1931, page 53, you made some er- 
rors in the article published that 
I wrote you some time ago. 

Top line should be father (not 
fater) . In line 20 from top, it 
should read I had known Elder 
Lester for about 30 years (instead 
of 3 years) . 

I had forgotten writing this let- 
ter to you as it was so long in being 
published, and the main cause was 
this: I was in a serious wreck 15 
months ago, while on my route as 
Kural Carrier. Two boys in a car 
ran so close (or in) to the horse I 
was driving on the narrow moun- 
tain road that my horse became 
frightened, started to run, the har- 
ness broke and I was thrown some 
15 to 20 feet away from my mail 
cart, striking a large stone which 
caused concussion of the brain. I 
was picked up in a semi-conscious 
condition. Could talk but have 
no recollection to this day of ever 
leaving home or the post office that 
day. And for months afterwards 
I can't remember what happened. 
My recollection is not good yet; un- 
less I make notes it is impossible to 
keep things in my mind. I am yet 
unable to work. With some of my 
family, or some friend to carry me, 
I fill my appointments when provi- 
dence permits. But I don't feel 
like I will ever be as I was before 
this injury. However, I am glad 



and I hope thankful to the Lord for 
blessing me so far with grace to be 
resigned to His holy will. Realiz- 
ing I am as clay in the potter's 
hand, a sinner saved by grace if 
saved at all. You are requested to 
make this correction. 
I thank you, 

J. G. L. HASH, 

Endicott, Va. 



COMFORT IN ITS PAGES. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co. 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Editor: 

Please find enclosed a check for 
two dollars for which you will 
please renew my subscription to 
the Landmark another year. 

I have read Zion's Landmark 
from my childhood and find much 
comfort in its truths. 

I love the many good letters, ex- 
periences and editorials. 

Many of the names are familiar. 
It is a great comfort to me and I 
hope to read it as long as I live. 

Wishing God's blessings upon 
each reader and desiring the pray- 
ers of His people. 

I am. 

Yours in an humble hope, 
Mrs. K. E. ADAMS, 
Greensboro, N. C. 



AN ERROR 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Mr. Gold: 

In Oct. 1st was a letter written 
for Zion's Landmark by myself. 
Please correct an error in Jer. 13: 
17-20, which should have been 
shall instead of should. 

Respectfully, 
J. L. Perdue, 

Air Point, Va. 



124 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



A SUBSCRIBER 40 YEARS. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sir: 

I enclose two dollars ($2.00) to 
renew my subscription to the Land- 
mark beginning with February the 
1st., 1931. 

I have been reading the Land- 
mark and a subscriber over forty 
years I enjoy and believe the 
doctrine as set forth by the writers 
and editors. 

Some of our preachers go to the 
extreme on some points. This 
causes trouble and confusion. 

Respectfully, 
Mrs. G. W. Asten, 
Danville, Va., Route 6, 



FEW PREACHERS IN HER 
SECTION. 

P. D. Gold Pub Co., 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Mr. Gold: 

I am sending in my renewal for 
the Landmark. I always enjoy 
reading the Zion's Landmark, as I 
find many good articles in it, and 
besides the Bible it is all I have for 
our preachers are very few here, 
and I haven't been able to hear one 
preach for about two years, and I 
feel to be very much alone in this 
unfriendly world. Of course there 
are evangelists here almost all the 
time, getting up a great excitement 
among the people, and are claim- 
ing to convert hundreds of people, 
but I notice as soon as the excite- 
ment wears off, and the evangelist 
has left, most of them go right back 
into worldly lust again. In fact 
they have never been brought out. 
If I hear preaching at all, this is 
mostly the kind here, once and a 
while I will go to one of these meet- 



ings thinking perhaps I could get a 
few crumbs, but, alas! I return 
home wishing I had not gone. Oh ! 
I so often wonder why I had to 
leave Virginia and come here, 
where I am almost sure I will have 
to spend the rest of my days, let 
them be long or short. Pardon me 
for writing so much, and I must 
stop for I only intended to renew 
my subscription, with only a few 
words, and not take up so much 
valuable space in your paper, but 
I would like to ask the brothers and 
sisters to pray for this unworthy sis- 
ter. 

Mrs. Etta Weikel, 
Dillard, Oregon. 



ADDRESS CHANGED. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear Friend: 

I ought to have written to you 
before. I have been in so much 
trouble I have kept putting it off. 
Inclosed you will find check for two 
dollars to pay for the Landmark. I 
would have written you before but 
decided to wait and write some- 
thing in memory of my husband. 

I want you to change my address 
from Tarboro, N. C. County Home 
Route 3 to Mrs. S. B. Mizell, Pal- 
myra, N. C, R. 1. 

Mrs. S. B. Mizell, 
Palmyra, N. C, Route 1. 



CHANGE OF ADDRESS. 

Elder James S. Corbett has 
changed his address from Green- 
ville, N. C. to Tarboro, N. C, 814 
Andrew Street. Elder Corbett and 
Mrs. L. I. Harriss were united in 
marriage on the 18th of December 
and their many friends will wish 
for them a long life of happiness 
and prosperity. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



125 



SUBSCRIPTIONS TO HELP 
THOSE WHO CANNOT PAY 

We have received from Brother 
L. W. Temple of Lake City, Fla., 
$3.00 to be added to the fund to 
help send the Landmark to those 
who are unable to pay for it, and 
$2.00 from Brother J. H. Ballance, 
of Dunn, N. C, to be applied for the 
same purpose. We desire to express 
our appreciation for these amounts, 
and we are sure that we express 
the appreciation of the recipients. 
The money is sent to renew the sub- 
scriptions of some who have recent- 
ly expressed through the Landmark 
the necessity for having their paper 
stopped because of their inability to 
pay for the paper, and these 
brethren write they want these pa- 
pers to continue, and in accordance 
with their wishes their accounts 
have been credited and the papers 
will continue to them. 

J. D. GOLD. 



INCOMPLETE WITHOUT 
LANDMARK. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co. 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sirs: 

Inclosed you will find money or- 
der for ($2.00) two dollars, for 
which please renew my subscrip- 
tion for the Landmark another year. 

I feel that my household would 
be incomplete without my Land- 
mark. It cheers me when I am 
downcast, and days look dark and 
dreary and when I begin to look on 
the dark side of everything, the 
Landmark helps me to solve the 
question by picturing everything on 
the plan of salvation. I am willing 
to sacrifice much to have the Land- 
mark in my home, because God's 
glory is magnified by his works and 
by his love to man. 



I sincerely hope I will not miss a 
single copy the rest of my life. 

Very sincerely, 

Mrs. J. N. Barnes, 
Greenville, N. C, R. 3. 



READING THE LANDMARK 
55 YEARS. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

Please find inclosed $2.00 for re- 
newal for Landmark, which has 
been coming to my home for 55 
years. I will soon be 89 years old, 
but I can see to read very well and 
I don't see how I can do without it. 
I expect I have more copies of the 
Landmark than any one outside of 
the office. 

I am sending $2.00 for a new sub- 
scriber, Mrs. W. O. Lee, Roxboro, 
N. C. Route 4. 

Wishing you much success, I re- 
main, with a little hope, 

Mrs. J. S. CLAYTON. 



LIKES TO READ LANDMARK 

Mr. John D. Gold: 

Please find enclosed $2.00, which 
pays for the Landmark another 
year, or until November 1931. If 
I am not deceived I love the doc- 
trine it contains and I enjoy read- 
ing the many good pieces that are 
published in it. Although we may 
be strangers in the flesh, I feel that 
we have relationship in the spirit 
for their experiences and feelings 
seem to be mine. I believe salva- 
tion is of the Lord, not of man or by 
man, for by grace are we saved 
through faith, and that not of your- 
self. It is the gift of God, if I am 
not deceived this is the doctrine I 
believe in. 

G. N. Warren, 

Stokes, N. C. 



126 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Zion^s Lapdmark 

"R«inoT« not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
Elder M. L. Gilbert — Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Koad, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. No. 8 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
&« aeeoud class matter 



WILSON, N. C. MARCH 1, 1931 



REVEALS HIMSELF TO A FEW. 

To the readers of Zion's Landmark: 
I am wondering if we, the Primi- 
tive or Old School Baptists of to- 
day fully appreciate the privileges 
we have and I trust employ. Read 
the eleventh chapter of Paul's let- 
ter to the Hebrews, and see what a 
degree of faith was given to the 
Lord's people in the olden times 
and note the wonderful things that 
they were enabled to accomplish by 
it, and coming to the latter part of 
the chapter note the trials and suf- 
ferings they were called upon to 
endure on account of their faith. 
Cruel mockings, intense suffering, 
and many of them death, not be- 
cause they were violators of law or 
in any way immoral people, but just 
because they worshipped their God 
after the way that the world called 
heresy. The world has never by 
its wisdom known God. The God 



who made the heavens and the 
earth is not seen by mortal eyes, is 
not heard by mortal ears, nor un- 
derstood by its natural heart. Yet 
he has been pleased from the days 
of Abel until now, to reveal himself 
unto a few, as he does not unto the 
world, and his testimonies to them 
are so wonderful that those receiv- 
ing them do not forget them, and 
they are so sacred and sweet that 
they love them better than their 
own lives, for the knowledge of a 
Saviour's love is the most assuring 
of all knowledge, because it is the 
Lord himself who gives it. So, 
when the Lord tells his children 
anything, they know that it is so, 
for the mouth of the Lord hath 
spoken it. The same thing told 
them by men they would not be- 
lieve. Had Mary told Joseph that 
her condition was the result of the 
overshadowing by the power of the 
highest, he would not have believed 
her. So the Lord told him and he 
knew it was true. This most con- 
vincing evidence which the Lord is 
pleased to give to his chosen peo- 
ple, has by the world been taken 
for self conceit, bigotry etc., but 
Jesus said, "I know my sheep, and 
am known of mine." And know- 
ing him they know the fallacy of all 
things besides, and this accounts 
for their faithfulness in the midst 
of persecution and suffering, and 
the Lord permitted it all to show 
that the faith of his humble poor 
overcomes the world. Now my dear 
brethren and sisters, go on and read 
the first part of the twelfth chapter 
and heed the exhortation of the 
apostle to lay aside every weight, 
and the sin which doth so easily be- 
set us, and let us run with patience 
the race which is set before us, 
looking unto Jesus, the author and 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



127 



finisher of our faith. We also, he 
says, are compassed about with a 
grer.t cloud of witnesses as the faith 
of the ancients are a witness to us. 
And the spirit itself beareth wit 
ness with our spirit that we are the 
children of God. See how much 
greater we are favored than they. 
They wandered about in sheep 
skins and goat skins, in mountains, 
and dens and caves of the earth, 
hiding fi'om those who would do 
them harm, in order to worship the 
Lord who graciously gave them the 
knowledge of salvation through his 
blessed Son. They could not lay 
aside every weight that hindered 
them for the powers that then were 
were against them. But the power 
that now is guarantees to us free- 
dom in the worship of our dear Sav- 
iour; then what weights have we? 
Our worldly business perhaps de- 
mands our attention. Remember 
that the world and the fullness 
thereof is the Lord's and he gives 
and withholds as it pleases him, and 
the world tells us that he withholds 
no good thing from them that walk 
uprightly. Maybe our brethren 
are not walking as we think they 
should, and are not saying every 
thing just as we would say it. Well, 
read Paul's epistle to the Galatians, 
and you will find that although the 
brethren there were not doing or 
saying all things as Paul would, he 
did not turn from them and refuse 
to worship with them, but was lab- 
oring to show them the true light, 
for he said that Jesus Christ had 
evidently been set forth crucified 
among them. Brethren can't we 
lay aside all these weights and the 
sin that does so easily beset us? the 
sin of unbelief. This sin so baffles 
us, and hinders us in the worship of 
our God, and in the love and service 



of one another that we become un- 
fit. Look at the abundant evi- 
dence we have that our God rules in 
the army of heaven and among the 
inhabitants of the earth. And he 
has chosen and called weak mortals 
like we are to serve him. And 
that he that doeth wrong shall suf- 
fer for the wrong which he hath 
done, and let us remember that our 
God can administer this punish- 
ment better than we can. Then let 
us run with patience that is endur- 
ance, as seeing Him who is invisible. 
If after all the love we can show, 
and all the gospel labor we can be- 
stow, brethren persist in walking 
disorderly, then we are told to with- 
draw from them, but I fear we 
sometimes withdraw without mani- 
festing the loving interest that we 
should. And the sheep are scatter- 
ed when they should not be. Let 
us not forget to look to Jesus, who 
is both the author and the finisher 
of our faith. And ask ourselves the 
question, what would Jesus do in 
this matter. Like Paul, let us ask, 
Lord what wilt thou have me to do. 
Jesus, for the joy that was set be- 
fore him, endured the cross, de- 
spising the shame, and is set down 
at the right hand of the throne of 
God. In his message by John to the 
seven churches of Asia, He says to 
him that overcometh will I grant to 
sit with me in my throne, even as I 
overcame and am sit down with my 
Father in his throne. So as the 
Father glorified Jesus with his own 
self, so will he glorify those who 
overcome the old man and put him 
off with his deeds. Is it not worth 
mortifying our members which are 
upon the earth, for we can do noth- 
ing pleasing to God without Jesus, 
but he says "Lo I am with you al- 
way, even unto the end of the 



128 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



world," and Paul says, We have the 
mind of Christ. Then he says in 
that wonderful sermon on the 
mount. "Let your light so shine be- 
fore men that they may see your 
good works and glorify your Father 
which is in heaven." 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 
Mrs. W. P. Warren, 
Prospect Hill. N. C. 
Dear Sister Warren: 

You will find enclosed the resolutions 
our union requested me to write of bro- 
ther Warren. Really, I can't say the 
things of him as I see them, for the half 
has never been told. His life was very 
precious to me. His encouragements will 
linger on. I hope you are reconciled to 
the great God of purpose, for He will 
soon call you and myself to that land we 
hope he has gone to, if we really know 
him in the pardon of our sins. Come to 
see us if you can. We would be glad to 
have you. 

Yours in hope, 

W. C. KING. 

The Union Letter 

Inasmuch as it has pleased God, our 
heavenly Father, to take out of this world 
by death, our precious brother, W. P. 
Warren, so suddenly on the streets of Me- 
bane, N. C, on August 22nd 1930; We, the 
Upper County Line Union wish to humbly 
bow to Him who doeth all things well. 

We do not mourn for him as tho.se who 
have no hope, but feel that our loss is his 
gain. The Lord giveth and the Lord 
taketh away. Blessed be His holy name. 

Resolved, 1st, that in the passing of bro- 
ther Warren his wife has lost a most 
faithful and loving husband, one who al- 
ways provided well for his household and 
those about him; the Upper Country Line 
Union one of its most faithful and use- 
ful members, always manifesting that 
humble child-like spirit; and his commun- 
ity, one of its most useful neighbors. 

2nd, that a copy of these resolutions be 
sent sister Warren, a copy be sent each 
Church composing this union and a copy 
be spread on our record book. Done by 
order of the union in session at Prospect 
Hill, August 1930. 

ELDER W. C. KING, 
Union Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas it has pleased God in his infin- 
ite wisdom to remove from our midst our 
beloved brother and clerk, Joseph B. 
Hardee, who was a charter member of 



the church at Bethel, Johnson Co., N. C, 
and faithfully served the church as clerk 
since it was organized in 1888. 
Therefore be it resolved: 
First: That in the passing of brother 
Hardee, the church has lost a faithful 
member, but we believe our loss is his 
gain, and we desire to bow in humble sub- 
mission to the will of an all wise God. 

Second: That we extend our deepest 
sympathy to the family in their loss. 

Third: That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the family, one to Zion's Land- 
mark for publication, and one to be re- 
corded on our church records. 

Done by order of the church at Bethel 
in conference Saturday, January 10, 1931. 
L. H. Parrish, 
Alva Hardee, 

Committee. 
B. F. Young, Mod. 
D. E. Young, Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas God in His infinite wisdom hag 
seen fit to remove from us our beloved 
pastor. Elder J. J. Hall, who faithfully 
served the church at Stories Creek, for 
many years; in the passing of Elder Hall, 
we feel that the church has sustained a 
great loss, although we desire to bow in 
humble submission to our heavenly Father 
who works all things after the Council of 
his own will, feeling that our loss is his 
eternal gain. 

Elder Hall, we feel to say was a good 
pastor, being well established in the doc- 
trine of salvation by grace. 

Therefore he left evidence sufficient for 
us to feel that he has fallen asleep in 
Jesus and resting in His love. May the 
God of all grace comfort the bereaved 
family and his many brethren, and sisters. 

Therefore, be it resolved that a copy of 
these resolutions be spread on our church 
record and a copy sent to Zion's Landmark 
for publication. Done by order of the 
Church in Conference at January meeting. 

Elder L. J. Chandler, Mod. 
Eld. Clayton, Church Clerk. 



WHITE OAK UNION 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 
Dear Sir: 

Please publish the following notice in 
Zion's Landmark. 

The next session of the White Oak 
Union is appointed to be held with the 
church at South West on Saturday and 
fifth Sunday in March, 1931. 

All lovers of truth are invited to meet 
with us. 

This church is located on No. 601 high- 
wav about 5 miles west of Jacksonville, 
N. C. 

Yours in hope, 

R. W. GURGANUS, 

Jacksonville, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

^^^^^^^^^^ AT ^^^^^^^^^^ 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL LXIV MARCH 15, 1931 No. 9 



THE CHILD DIES. 

And when the child was grown, it fell on a day, that he went out to 
his father to the reapers. 

And he said unto his father, my head, my head. And he said to a lad. 
Carry him to his mother. 

And when he had taken him and brought him to his mother, he sat 
on her knees till noon and then died. 

And she went up and laid him on the bed of the man of God, and shut 
the door upon him and went out. 

And she called unto her husband and said, send me I pray thee one 
of the young men, and one of ths asses, that I may run to the man of 
God and come again. 

And he said wherefore wilt thou go to him today. It is neither new 
moon nor Sabbath. And she said it shall be well. 

Then she saddled an ass, and said to herself. Drive and go forward, 
slack not thy riding for me, except I bid thee. 

So she went and came unto the man of God to Mt. Carmel. And it 
came to pass, when the man of God saw her afar off that he said to 
Gehazi his servant, behold yonder is that Shunamite. — 2 King 4:18-26. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



!g.;3Fi ^nSRi= i.* |i,mL*i.hiinnfmi»iHB ^ ■■■■ ■ ^ 

THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
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®evote& to the (lause of ^c&us Cbdst 



A TOUCHING INCIDENT OF THE 
CONVERSION OF A YOUNG 
LADY. 

(Reprint by Request) 
The following article was first 
published in the Gospel Messenger 
in 1891. It has been published in 
our columns before, but we give 
space for it again by special re- 
quest. 

About thirty-five years ago, be- 
fore the late war, there lived a 
wealthy farmer some forty miles 
from Opelika, Ala., and having the 
means at hand, he had given his 
children a liberal education, and 
lived to see several of them married 
and settled in comfortable homes 
of their own. And in addition to 
this he had other and higher sources 
of joy in seeing the grace of God 
manifest in some of them, so that 
they became devoted members of 
the Primitive Baptist church, of 
which both he and his wife were 
members. 

But amidst all these enjoyments 
and comforts, these devoted Chris- 
tian parents had, for a time, some 
things to regret and mourn over. 
They had one amiable and lovely 
single daughter — educated, intelli- 
gent, refined in her conversation 
and manners, but like many others 
of her opportunities and accom- 
plishments, she had much vanity 
and pride, and thought the Primi- 
tive Baptist church rather a low 
stoop for her family. The little 



church where her father and 
mother were members, though lo- 
cated in a community of consider- 
able wealth, fashion and style, had 
a few poor members in it, and 
among them one aged sister whose 
best attire when she came to meet- 
ing was a plain homespun dress, 
spun, woven and made by her own 
hands. And besides her extremely 
worldly poverty it was said that her 
husband treated her most cruelly. 
But to the honor of God's grace, 
amidst all these trials and embar- 
rassments, this poor, aged sister was 
blessed with a meek and quiet spirit 
and had the loving confidence and 
fellowship of every member in the 
church, whether they were rich or 
poor in this world's goods. The 
time of church communion and feet 
washing came on, and when this 
lovely and amiable daughter saw 
that her precious mother selected 
this poor old sister as the one whose 
feet she wished to wash, it was 
more than she could bear without 
some expression of contempt. Turn- 
ing to some of her youthful associ- 
ates, she said, "I am surprised and 
deeply mortified to think that my 
mother would wash the feet of that 
old thing." And having expression 
of sympathy from her vain com- 
rades, her usual refinement, mod- 
esty and intelligence had for a time 
to give way for her indignant feel- 
ings of contempt. 

But how wonderful is the love of 
God in Christ! It is from everlast- 



130 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ing, and it is written of Him who 
washed His disciples' feet that 
"Having loved His own He loved 
them to the end." — John 13. And 
it is evident from subsequent events 
that this haughty, proud and vain 
young lady was loved of God with 
an everlasting love, and with lov- 
ing kindness drew her to Himself, 
and drew her away from these fool- 
ish vanities of the world. 

Some tim.e after her attendance 
at this "feet washing meeting" she 
visited some of her kindred in an- 
other part of the state, and was sick 
nigh unto death, so that she and all 
her kindred and friends including 
the doctors despaired of her life. 
Her father and mother were sent 
for, to whom she related in feeble 
whispers, dreadful agonies of the 
soul she was sirffering under a feel- 
ing sense of the wrath of God upon 
her as a sinner. But there she lay, 
week after week, growing more 
and more feeble, until she was a 
mere skeleton and could only be 
heard to speak as her father would 
put his ear close to her mouth. The 
doctor directed the utmost quiet to 
be observed, as the poor child was 
so feeble and nervous. For a few 
days there were scarcely any symp- 
toms of life or breath in her. 

But the time had come in the pur- 
pose of God for a change, and to 
make known the riches of His grace 
upon a vessel of mercy whom He 
had afore prepared to receive such 
grace in faith and love. Suddenly 
she aroused, a glow of heavenly 
light and love was seen upon her 
face, while with uplifted hands and 
clear, distinct voice she proclaimed 
the praise of God, who saved her 
from her sins. Some friends, think- 
ing such demonstrations would 
cause immediate death, tried to get 



her to hold her peace, but so much 
the more she rejoiced and praised 
God. 

Eventually her attending physi- 
cian came in, telling her she must 
be quiet, she was too feeble to talk, 
and that death would certainly en- 
sue if she did not cease to speak and 
exert herself in such a manner. She 
looked calmly and steadfastly upon 
the doctor for a moment, then 
reaching out her feeble hand and 
taking hold of his, she said, "Oh, 
doctor, have you no confidence in 
God? Cannot the great and om- 
nipotent God who has saved such a 
sinner as I am, give strength and 
enable me to tell of His wonderful 
work to the praise and glory of His 
grace?" The doctor, her father, 
mother and other friend around the 
bed were astonished, and for a time 
quite overcome. But eventually the 
overjoyed father, seeing the Lord 
had spoken peace to his dear child, 
cried out: "Speak on, daughter, as 
much as you please; it is not going 
to hurt you." She continued with 
short intervals of rest, to speak the 
praises of God, and tell of the won- 
ders of His grace to her, a poor, 
helpless sinner, expressing a fer- 
vent desire and prayed that God 
would raise her from affliction so 
that she might be carried once more 
to her father's home near the little 
church where he was a member, 
and that she might have the privi- 
lege of talking to the church and 
being baptized, and especially she 
desired, if received into fellowship 
among Primitive Baptists, that she 
could have the privilege of getting 
on her knees before that poor old 
sister whose feet her mother had 
washed, and be permitted to wash 
her feet as Jesus washed His dis- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



131 



ciples and wiped them with the 
towel wherewith he was girded. 

But the faith of this poor suffer- 
ing youth had to be tried. Her re- 
covery was very slow, and at times 
thought to be doubtful. She thought 
the time long, and the distance 
across the country by private con- 
veyance, compared with her feeble 
condition made it seem almost im- 
possible for her to make the trip. 

Eventually her faith triumphed 
over all seeming difficulties, and a 
suitable vehicle was prepared, so 
that she returned home with joy and 
thankfulness to God, though much 
exhausted. One church meeting 
after another came on, and she was 
still too feeble to attend, but still 
her fervent desire to follow Jesus 
in baptism continued unabated. And 
having requested if she should ever 
be received by the church, that the 
writer of this article should baptize 
her, I was sent for. I never had the 
pastoral care of the church though 
I preached there two or three 
times. A time was set when it was 
hoped she would be able to attend 
the church conference, some two or 
three miles from her home. Start- 
ing from my home by private con- 
veyance, quite early on Friday 
morning, I reached her father's 
home late in the afternoon. She 
had just been riding about one mile 
which was the first time she had 
ventured out since her arrival home. 
She rejoiced greatly on seeing me, 
and said she had fervently prayed 
that God would enable me to come ; 
that now I had come she believed 
the Lord had sent me. Her con- 
versation was meek, humble and 
heavenly and in quite a composed 
manner she related to me the sub- 
stance of what I have written of the 
dealings of the Lord with her. Her 



father and mother also told me 
many things which would be ex- 
ceedingly interesting to many read- 
ers, but time and space forbid the 
mention of them now. 

Suffice is to say that after many 
trials, struggles and fervent prayers 
to God, this amiable young lady got 
to the church meeting and after 
preaching an opportunity was given 
by the church in conference for any 
who might desire membership to 
come forward and let the church 
hear them. By the assistance of 
her mother and sisters she was 
raised from the temporary couch on 
which she had been lying during 
the hour of preaching, walked to 
what is sometimes called the "Mod- 
erator's seat," and was seated by 
the Moderator, relating in a clear 
distinct manner, though with feeble 
voice, the dealings of the Lord with 
her, and was heartily received by 
the church as a proper subject for 
baptism, which was to be attended 
to next morning. 

But when the morning for her 
baptism came, her mother had fears 
the dear daughter would not be able 
to leave her room. She had not 
rested well through the night, but 
she insisted that she be allowed to 
go to the water for baptism. 
Promptly at 10 A. M., she was at 
the creek, a beautiful place for bap- 
tizing. After singing and prayer, 
she was led into the water by the 
writer. On raising her out of the 
water she seemed to be entirely 
helpless so that some thought the 
shock had been too great for her 
feeble nervous system ; that it would 
never react. But after waiting and 
holding her up for a moment or two 
I saw tokens of life and joy of soul. 
I almost literally carried her out of 
the water, as she was so feeble. And 



132 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



it is almost needless to say to the 
Christian readers with what joy 
the sisters and aged mother in Israel 
received this young sister in their 
arms at the water's edge, rejoicing 
and praising God for the wonders 
of His love. 

At the appointed hour for preach- 
ing this young sister was comfort- 
ably cared for in the house, and said 
she felt better than at any time 
since she had been prostrated. She 
seemed to enjoy the services of the 
day exceedingly and on the next day 
(Monday) before taking my leave 
of the family for my home I had 
quite a pleasant conversation with 
her concerning her faith in Christ 
Jesus. 

After our return home we would 
occasionally hear that this afflicted 
sister was gradually and slowly im- 
proving in bodily health, and the 
fruits of the Spirit were abounding 
abundantly in every good word and 
work. 

But the faith, if strong in the 
Lord, must be tried by fire, that it 
may be found to the praise and 
glory of God. Trouble got into the 
church, parties were formed, one 
headed by the pastor and one by 
the deacon. Again I and other 
preachers were sent for to ai din re- 
storing peace and fellowship. We 
found a bad state of feeling exist- 
ing among the members, and a bad 
spirit was at work, so that but few 
of them could really tell what they 
were fussing about. When we ar- 
rived there on Saturday the breth- 
ren were gathered in squads here 
and there out of the house, and 
some of them could hardly be pre- 
vailed upon to go into the house at 
all. One aged brother, a doubting 
Thomas, said to me, "We are torn 
all to pieces here; this is the last 



church meeting we will ever have." 
At length a few brethren and sis- 
ters engaged in singing and after 
preaching services were over it was 
manifest by the countenance of the 
brethren that a better spirit was 
prevailing. The church conference 
was organized, the subject of the 
difficulty was freely discussed in a 
mild and Christian like spirit. He 
was an intelligent man and a good 
brother, but naturally "high- 
strung" — stern and decided in his 
convictions, whether right or wrong 
— and when he took a position, he 
never yielded until fully convinced 
of his error. 

This deacon had been a useful 
member in the church and was a 
brother-in-law of our young sister. 
I and other visiting brethren went 
home with him that afternoon, and 
for two hours or more we labored 
to show him his wrong and save him 
to the church, but he remained 
stern and obstinate. This precious 
young sister, with silent attention, 
had listened to all that had been 
said till her whole soul was absorb- 
ed in the fervent desire for gospel 
peace and fellowship to be con- 
tinued in the church, and seeing 
that her brother-in-law, whom she 
loved as a Christian, was wrong and 
stubborn, she could no longer re- 
main silent. Suddenly she sprang 
from her seat and dropped on her 
knees before the unyielding deacon, 
and seizing hold of his hand, she 
gave vent to that fervent desire 
within her, which could no longer 
be concealed, by exclaiming: "Oh, 
Brother William, you are too stub- 
born. Can't you be more like Christ, 
who has died for your sins and my 
sins, and as God, for Christ's sake 
has forgiven us, can you not for- 
give your brother for whom Christ 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



133 



suffered and died on the cross?" 
And a more pointed, forcible and 
touching prayer I never heard than 
she then and there poured forth for 
her brother and the church. All ex- 
cept the stubborn deacon were in 
silent tears. 

After this affecting scene had 
passed off there was but little more 
conversation on any subject. The 
company dispersed, and soon we re- 
tired to rest during the night. I 
felt a degree of confidence that the 
angel of peace and love had spread 
her heavenly wings over the little 
church. Early next morning I saw 
the deacon making for the silent 
grove nearby, and when he return- 
ed to his room I saw that he had 
been weeping, and his countenance 
manifested great agony of soul. 
Nothing more was said concerning 
the church trouble and very soon 
all of us were off to the meeting. 

When the hour for preaching 
came a large congregation of peo- 
ple were in attendance, and the 
preaching seemed to be with great 
power, and we felt that the power 
of the Lord was present to heal. At 
the close of the preaching services 
a hymn was sung for dismission, 
and just as we were about to dis- 
miss the beloved brother deacon 
arose from his seat waving his 
hand, and in sobs and tears even- 
tually said, in broken accents: 
'•Hold on Brother Mitchell — don't 
dismiss yet — I must speak a little, 
and tell the church and brethren 
here that I have been the whole 
trouble in this church. I ask them 
to forgive me if they can, though I 
am not worthy of their confidence. 
I have sinned and have been stub- 
bornly wrong, but could not see it. 
But last night the solemn admoni- 
tion and prayer of the dear young 



sister yesterday took such a hold 
upon me that I could not sleep and 
in fervent prayer in the silent grove 
this morning I felt that the Lord had 
showed mercy to me, and I have 
felt during the preaching today that 
I would die if I did not confess my 
wrongs to God and to my brethren 
and sisters, who have borne so long 
and patiently with me. I trust that 
God, for Christ's sake, has forgiven 
me, and ask forgiveness of the 
members of sister churches." This 
little talk settled the trouble and 
the Christian reader may well im- 
agine the effect upon those who 
heard it. 

And now. Brother Respass and 
readers of the Messenger, suffer me 
to say that the love and mercy has 
been written a little at a time under 
circumstances very unfavorable as 
it seems to the writer, but from some 
cause I have been strangely im- 
pressed in mind, for many days to 
write a brief sketch of the abound- 
ing grace of God as manifest to that 
dear young sister. There are a few 
yet living who were eye and ear wit- 
nesses of the main substance of 
what I have written, but some have 
"fallen asleep." 

This communication is somewhat 
lengthy but hope the blessings of 
the Lord may rest upon all readers 
who love and serve Lord Jesus. 

W. M. Mitchell. 



"THE LORD IS MY SHEPHERD, 
I SHALL NOT WANT." 

The following letter has been sent 
us by Dr. Cox for publication: 
Dr. B. F. Cox, 
Beloved brother in Christ: 

I would write to you, if I did not 
think you knew of my infirmities 
and would forgive what I may say 
amiss. Of late I have felt so unfit, 



134 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



that I have kept my thoughts to 
myself, but last night as well as 
many nights, instead of sleeping I 
am meditating, sometimes how the 
Lord has been merciful to me in 
sending my brethren, sisters and 
friends to me in my weakness and 
distress. Sometimes the 23rd Psalm 
comes to me sweetly. I well re- 
member in the year 1899, that I 
first felt that I could say "The Lord 
is my Shepherd, I shall not want." 
I believe every child of God has felt 
this at some time. Indeed there is 
nothing to want if God is in our 
hearts, for with Him we have all 
things. While in the hospital in 
Richmond, sick and lonely and none 
but strangers to see, suddenly I 
wanted to read. A Bible was kept 
lying by my bed and I read and re- 
read this Psalm for hours, and dur- 
ing my long illness since, it has 
strengthened my hope and comfort- 
ed me so much and made me rejoice 
to have you and others come, sing 
and talk. 

I believe the Lord gives talents to 
every one of His people and to visit 
the distressed and comfort them, is 
multiplying these talents and is 
pleasing to the Lord. 

Dear brother, I remember your 
visits as I do hundreds of others, 
with much pleasure, and hope I 
may live worthy of your love and 
fellowship. 

I am slowly regaining the use of 
my limbs, but am not permitted to 
go out much. I do go to church 
sometimes, when it is near. 

Sometime come to see me again. 
I believe I love God's people and al- 
though I cannot sing with them, 
now, I hope to join with the redeem- 
ed in ceaseless songs around God's 
throne. 



There are many that I would love 
to write to, but I can't write. I 
don t forget them, and I hope they 
are praying for me. 

Your unworthy brother, 
H. L. BRAKE. 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 



THE MERCY OF GOD. 

When I was a young man, I had 
great aspirations to be something. 
And when I began a family, I was 
determined to govern my home 
and to raise my children, as I want- 
ed them to be, and to give them all 
a high school education at least. 

And I don't know why it is so 
but with me in almost every thing 
that I have ever looked forward to 
with pleasure has in some way been 
blighted. And when I joined the 
church, I carried the same high 
ideals of the deportment and con- 
versation of a Christian. Then I 
felt to be full of life and zeal and 
did not understand why all of my 
brethren did not be the same way. 
But now I feel to know. If I am 
anything, it is purely the mercy of 
God. And I feel now to sympa- 
thize with any of my brethren 
though they be guilty of every kind 
of sin except, "the unpardonable 
one." It seems like every kind of 
trouble has crowded upon me until 
I shall yet go completely crazy. 

I cannot rule my house as I would. 
I do not have the co-operation that 
I need. And am now overwhelm- 
ingly in debt with no one to sympa- 
thize, but rather to criticize which 
is almost unbearable. And there, 
my own life (sinful) which is the 
greatest of all my trouble. Jobe and 
Jeremiah, also Jonah seem to be my 
nearest companions. I am humili- 
ated until my judgment, both nat- 
ural and spiritual seem to be gone 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



135 



(almost) . I long to go home, if in- 
deed I have one, but I seem to be 
farther away (if possible) than 
ever. I must confess that I am a 
failure in every respect. I seem to 
not do anything as I ought to, so 
there is absolutely nothing in all the 
world except the mercy of God that 
will, or can, reach my case. God, in 
justice to my sinful life has hid his 
face, and doesn't answer me any 
more, unless, it is as the Psalmist 
says, "By terrible things in right- 
eousness wilt thou answer us" 
which to us is very trying, long ex- 
pectation, held in suspense. 

Let me conclude. I am getting 
nowhere. I can't write, I can't 
talk, I can't preach, and I can't do 
anything like I would. I feel to 
know that I am a fool and that 
everybody else knows it. 

Yours in tribulation, 

Jno. R. Smith, 
Reidsville, N. C., R. 5. 



DOES NOT WANT TO MISS 
A SINGLE COPY. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 
Dear Friend: 

You will find enclosed check for 
($2.00) two dollars to pay on my 
subscription for the year 1931. I 
do not want to miss a single copy. I 
have been taking it ever since 1925. 
I am 74 years of age and I want to 
take it the rest of my life. I like 
vei-y much to read the good pieces 
and I remember hearing your 
daddy preach one time. I hope 
you can continue for many years in 
your good work. I would like for 
you to write some more pieces. I 
hope I am one of the little ones in 
Christ. 

MRS. W. A. GOTTEN, 
Holly Springs, N. C. 



CAN'T DO WITHOUT THE 
LANDMARK. 

P. D. Gold Publishing Co. 
Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sir: 

Please find enclosed $2.00 to pay 
for my renewal subscription to the 
Landmark which will carry it to 
Oct. 1, 1931. I am very sorry to 
have neglected sending it so long. I 
don't feel like I could do without 
the Landmark since I am old and a 
good distance from Church. The 
paper has been coming to Chalk 
Level to Mrs. S. B. Murphy and I 
want it sent to Mrs. Minerva Mur- 
phy, Gretna, Va., since I have 
moved and am now a widow. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Minerva Murphy. 



BELIEVE ALL HIS TRUTH. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 
Dear Sir: 

Enclosed please find money or- 
der for ($2.00) two dollars, which 
pays for the Landmark another 
year, which will end Oct. 15, 1931. 
For if not deceived I love the doc- 
trine it contains. I enjoy reading 
the good writings of the brethren. 
Although we may be strangers in 
the flesh, I feel we have relation- 
ship in the spirit, for their experi- 
ences and feelings seem to be mine. 
I believe salvation is of the Lord, 
not of man nor by man, for by grace 
are ye saved through faith and that 
not of yourself, it is the gift of 
God. If not deceived this is the 
doctrine I believe. Again Jesus 
says, "I am the light of the world. 
He that believeth in me shall never 
die, and my hope is that I believe 
all His truth. 

(Mrs.) Mary C. Jones, 
Deep Run, N. C, R. 1. 



136 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Zion's Landmark 



"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
Elder M. L. Gilbert — Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. No. 9 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C. MARCH 15, 1931 



NOTHING. 

I have been thinking of the v^ord 
nothing, as it is used in different 
places in the Bible, and find that it 
signifies first, not anything, as in 
Gen. 18:8. "Only unto these men 
do nothing, for therefore came they 
under the shadovi^ of my roof," 
which means, do not bother them in 
any way. Second for no use or 
service, as in Math. 5:13. "Ye are 
the salt of the earth, but if the salt 
have lost his savour, wherewith 
shall it be salted? It is thenceforth 
good for nothing, but to be cast out, 
and to be trodden under foot of 
men." There is still a mass or bulk 
but it is of no value. Third of no 
force to bind or oblige, as in Math. 
23:16-18. In this scripture those 
whom Jesus calls blind guides, fools 
and blind, said. Whosoever swear- 
eth by the Temple, it is nothing, or 



by the altar it is nothing. That is, 
they were not bound by their oath 
to do what they had promised to do. 
Fourth, it signifies. No good works 
that are acceptable to God, as in 
John 15:5, "I am the vine, ye are 
the branches: he that abideth in me 
and I in him, the same bringeth 
forth much fruit, for without me ye 
can do nothing." This scripture 
teaches us that all the good works 
that men do, in the Kingdom of 
God, or the Church of Christ, they 
are moved to them by Jesus, him- 
self. In this fifteenth chapter of 
John Jesus is speaking of Himself 
and His church under the similitude 
of a vine and its branches, and says 
"As the branch cannot bear fruit of 
itself except it abide in the vine, no 
more can ye except ye abide in me. 
Abiding in Christ is in keeping His 
commandments, as He says in verse 
ten, but the sheep of his pasture 
sometimes go astray and when they 
do they are not under the influence 
of his spirit. "Let no man say 
when he is tempted, I am tempted 
of God, for God cannot be tempted 
with evil, neither tempteth he any 
man, but every man is tempted 
when he is drawn away of his own 
lust and enticed. James 1:18-14. 
So when thus drawn away he is 
without Christ, and so his work is 
not pleasing to God. Jesus is the 
mediator between God and man, 
and it is by him that men come to 
God, and all this coming to him and 
abiding in him is the sweet influ- 
ence of Christ who leads his sheep 
to green pastures, and he is the vine 
whose sap (grace) enables the 
branch to bear fruit, but if he does 
not abide in Christ, that is, keep his 
commandments, he is cast forth as 
a branch, and men gather them and 
cast them into the fire and they are 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



137 



burned. Christ is not with them 
then, but has delivered them to 
Satan for the destruction of the 
flesh. For if ye live after the flesh 
ye shall die, and they are not with 
Christ when they are living after 
the flesh, but working in his vine- 
yard they have his presence and the 
blessed influence of his spirit, and 
so realize as did Paul that, "I can 
do all things through Christ which 
strengtheneth me." Paul said, 
"And though I have the gift of 
prophecy, and understand all mys- 
teries and all knowledge; and 
though I have all faith, so that I 
could remove mountains and have 
not charity, I am nothing." 1st Cor. 
13:2. A man devoid of the love 
of God, is still a man, and may be 
profitable in the world, but in the 
church he is nothing, because his 
work and his talk is all prompted 
by the flesh, and so cannot result in 
any good to the Lord's people. 
They are craving spiritual food and 
this man though wise and fluent 
does not have it. 5th. False and 
groundless as in Acts 21 :24. "Them 
take, and purify thyself with them, 
and be at charges with them, that 
they may shave their heads, and all 
may know that those things, where- 
of they were informed concerning 
thee, are nothing." That is they 
have no foundation in fact, and so 
are false, or nothing. "Blessed are 
ye when men shall revile you, and 
persecute you, and shall say all 
manner of evil against you falsely, 
for my sake." How good it is when 
uncomplimentary reports are circu- 
lated about a preacher, a brother 
or a sister, to be able to say it is false 
there is no ground for it. It is 
nothing. It is for Jesus' sake. There 
is a blessing in it. They persecuted 
him before they persecuted you. 



6th. No other means, as in Mark 
9:29, "And he said unto them, this 
kind can come forth by nothing, but 
by prayer and fasting. This is the 
only way, all other ways are noth- 
ing. 

7th. No reward or wages, as in 
3rd John, 7, "Because that for his 
name's sake they went forth, taking 
nothing of the Gentiles." Jesus said 
to his apostles concerning the nat- 
ural comforts of this life. "Your 
Father knoweth that ye have need 
of these things." They evidently 
had support from some source, but 
they took nothing from the Gen- 
tiles. 

8th. No new doctrine pertaining 
to salvation, as in Gal. 2:6. But of 
these who seemed to be somewhat. 
(Whatsoever they were, it maketh 
no matter to me; God accepted no 
man's person.) For they who seem- 
ed to be somewhat in conference 
added nothing to me:" all their 
conferring about the law was noth- 
ing to Paul. He still preached 
Christ as the fulfiller of the law, 
and the only means of salvation. 

9th. No sin or guilt, as in John 
14:30: "Hereafter I will not talk 
much with you, for the prince of 
this world cometh, and hath noth- 
ing in me." There is absolutely no 
sin in him, nothing in common with 
the prince of this world, and so they 
say, away with him. 

10th. No divine power, no God, 
as in 1st Cor. 8:4. "As concerning 
therefore the eating of those things 
that are offered in sacrifice unto 
idols, we know that an idol is noth- 
ing in the world, and there is none 
other God but one." All the stocks, 
be they wood, stone, silver or gold, 
also all the imagination of the car- 
nal mind, though they be cunningly 
devised, are no Gods. They are 



138 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



stocks, and fables, but as Saviours 
or comforters of the Lord's humble 
poor they are nothing. The word 
is taken first absolutely, as in Job. 
26:7. "He stretcheth out the north 
over the empty place, and hangeth 
the earth upon nothing." Psalms 
49:17. "For when he dieth he 
shall carry nothing away, his glory 
shall not descend after him." These 
scriptures show us that the earth 
has no support. It remains just 
where God placed it, and where he 
still holds it. Also that none even 
of the good things of the world can 
be taken to Heaven. That eternal 
and blessed abode does not need 
the light of the sun, for the Lord 
God is its everlasting light and 
glory. 2nd, comparatively, as in 
Psalms 39:5, "Behold thou hast 
made my days as an hand breadth, 
and my age is as nothing before 
thee. Verily, every man at his best 
state is altogether vanity." Isaiah 
40:17. "All nations before him are 
as nothing: and they are counted to 
him less than nothing, and vanity." 

These scriptures show us that 
while nations and men do exist and 
as such serve God's purpose in na- 
ture, they are compared to him, 
and his spiritual kingdom as noth- 
ing, even less than nothing, and 
vanity. All of man's works, and 
all of his thoughts are evil contin- 
ually. So they are nothing spirit- 
ually. 3rd. In a person's estimation 
of himself, as in 2nd Cor. 12:119, 
"I am become a fool in glorying: ye 
have compelled me: for I ought to 
have been commended of you: for 
in nothing am I behind the very 
chiefest apostles, though I be noth- 
ing." Here the apostle is telling 
of his nothingness in the kingdom 
of God, except that which the Lord 
by his grace has mad& him. And 



again he said that it is by the grace 
of God that I am what I am, mean- 
ing a child of God and an apostle 
of Jesus Christ. 4th. Not in the 
matter, but in the manner, as being 
of no use or service, as in 1st Cor. 
7:19. "Circumcision is nothing, 
and uncircumcision is nothing, but 
the keeping of the commandments 
of God." Thus circumcision is 
called nothing, because it avails 
nothing, in point of acceptance 
with God. Now in gospel times, by 
God's spirit the sinner is brought 
into Christ. So is a new creature, 
with the mind and spirit of Christ, 
who is with him, and in him and 
thus he is made capable of obed- 
ience. Though in himself he is 
nothing. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



GOSPEL SALVATION IS OF 
THE LORD. 

Today I found a copy of a letter I 
wrote some years ago to an Elder; 
and about all he said in reply, was 
he had nearly one hundred endorse- 
ments from Primitive Baptists, both 
Editors and brethren; and, that I 
was the only one that did not en- 
dorse his views. 

Who is there among the readers 
of Zion's Landmark that cannot see 
how I was made to sympathize with 
Elijah: "And I, even I only, am 
left."— 1 Kings, 19:14. 



The Letter. 

May 7, 1925. 

Eld. H. L. Colston, 
Dear Brother: 

For some cause I am led to write 
you, I trust in love for the cause of 
Zion, not in altercation. In the 
May issue of The Primitive Baptist 
I have just read your answers to 
certain quasiicns you had in mind; 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



139 



I am addressing you as an Elder in 
the Primitive Baptist ranks, though 
I do not recall that I ever before 
heard of you. 

I know the churches of the New 
Testament differed much in gifts 
and graces, and while many of 
them were very spiritually minded, 
the record shows that they were 
fallible and human as the church or 
saints have been in every age; but 
we do not find that they then non- 
fellowshipped each other for the 
manner of expression, as they have 
been doing for the last forty years. 
Now, there seems to be a tendency 
among the rank and file of our peo- 
ple to speak as the oracles of God, 
believing that He directed the in- 
spired Apostles to use suitable 
words for all ages, fearing they 
might do violence to His doc- 
trine to use qualifying expressions, 
some of which have been bones of 
contention for years, causing many 
sore and ungospel divisions among 
the dear Baptists, man yexpressions 
which cannot be found in any pub- 
lished statements made previous to 
the date of 1865. 

I have been made to rejoice of 
late to see so many churches and 
elders coming together in sweet fel- 
lowship, having been divided, from 
making each other offendors for a 
word or words, now being led by 
the Spirit of the Lord to confess 
their faults and weakness to each 
other, and that they did not know 
every thing in heaven and earth, 
and were not with God when He 
took counsel. Most all are willing 
to take admonition of Peter, "Speak 
as the oracles of God," and as Paul 
says, with "sound speech, that can- 
not be condemned." 

It is to be feared that our relig- 
ious papers frequently publish 
things that do more harm than 



good; 1 regretted some expressions 
in your letter, and if they have a 
"thus saith the Lord" for them, I 
acknowledge that I am too weak to 
see them. You tell us of "a salva- 
tion brought by the preacher," but 
did not tell where or how he got it. 
However, you tell us it was a "time- 
ly salvation." Do you think there 
is an untimely salvation, or that 
anybody ever received one before 
time, or ever will receive one after 
time? However Mr. Russell claim- 
ed that the wicked dead would have 
a chance but he did not know whe- 
ther they would accept it.' Then you 
presume to tell us how the "timely 
salvation brought by the preacher" 
may be for weal or woe; as, "By 
their hearing and doing, and in it 
and for it, they either get a time 
salvation or a time damnation." I 
might not have been surprised to 
see such sentiments expressed by 
an Arminian, but never expected to 
see such from the pen of a Primitive 
Baptist. 

I know good words prove our 
faith, but do not produce it; and 
that the saints are confirmed and 
established according to the gospel, 
and the preaching of Jesus Christ, 
etc., "for the obedience of faith." 
Paul did not take credit to himself 
for doing more works than the 
other Apostles, but ascribed it all to 
the grace of God which was with 
him, and furthermore declared that 
if it be of grace, it is not of works. 
Paul, referring to the salvation 
Christians enjoy in their gospel ser- 
vices, says: "For by grace are ye 
saved through faith; and that not 
of yourselves ; it is the gift of God ; 
not of works, lest any man should 
boast." And not God's children 
taught both by the word of truth 
and their experience that without 
the Lord they can do nothing; that 



140 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



is, cannot do any spiritual or gospel 
service or worship? It does not 
mean ye cannot sin or do wrong — 
"Let no man say when he is tempt- 
ed, I am tempted of God, for God 
cannot be tempted with evil, neither 
tempteth he any man." "But in all 
devotion and service to God, it is 
He which worketh (not worked) in 
you both to will and to do of His 
good pleasure." The children were 
created in Christ unto good works. 

When you quoted: "Salvation is 
of the Lord," you did not tell us 
what period of time that was. 

I have always had the idea that 
all God-taught Baptists believed 
that salvation was not obtained by 
creature work or creature ability; 
and I am sure if you could remove 
the veil of tradition, with the Bible 
open and let your experience talk, 
you would never again express such 
a sentiment as you did in said arti- 
cle. 

I note you had something to say 
about predestination. I have al- 
ready made my letter much longer 
than I expected when I began to 
write you. I never have found out 
where God ever gave any man au- 
thority to qualify His predestina- 
tion, yet many are doing so, calling 
it limited and unlimited, absolute 
and conditional. Some would tell 
us that God's predestination extends 
to and covers all things; others tell 
us not so, that it only embraces 
good things, and the salvation of 
His people. As "secret things be- 
long to the Lord our God: but those 
things which are revealed belong 
to us," I wonder how either know 
the whole counsel of God? Why 
should finite man presume to be 
wise above that which is written? 
How strange that men should fall 
out about things that they do not 



know, for that they know, they are 
agreed upon. 

I have been satisfied for a long 
time with what the Scriptures 
teach, and if all saints would say 
no more nor less than what the 
Scriptures clearly teach, then many 
of the dear children who are stay- 
ing out because of the bickerings of 
our people, would come to Zion 
seeing and speaking the same. 

Your brother, I hope, 
M. L. GILBERT. 



PLEASE CORRECT. 

Our Lord never made a mistake, 
but it is human to err. Being so 
full of mistakes, I am ever ready to 
show forbearance toward those 
who make them. Now, I would 
kindly ask that the printer of my 
little editorial in February 15 on 
the Virgin Mary be corrected. Near 
the bottom of first column on page 
107 in the sentence — "To be bless- 
ed of God does not exalt his ser- 
vants (not services) in nature, but 
humbles them Godward." On same 
page second column where Prov. 
8:22-31, is quoted Catholics applies 
the language to the Virgin Mary 
which evidently refer to Christ. 
The printer puts it "Baptist." Then 
just below following Mary's "watch- 
ful care of others" : — "It is the 
wine was wanted" should not ap- 
pear. "Jesus was obedient to 
Mary and Joseph," and not it oc- 
curs. 

Yours cordially, 

M. L. GILBERT. 

Dade City, Fla. 

P. S. — I made no copy of the ar- 
ticle, so I can not be sure just how 
it was written. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



141 



JOHN FRANKLIN McGINTY. 

When it was learned Dec. 2nd, 19 30, 
that Deacon John Franklin McGinty had 
passed to his heavenly home, his relatives 
and friends far and near v^^ere saddened be- 
yond expression. It was known that he 
was afflicted, and a great sufferer at 
times; yet, they hoped, because of his use- 
fulness he might be spared longer. Of his 
going, it can be truly said that "a great 
and good man has fallen in Israel." Great 
because of his exemplary life as a husband, 
father, neighbor, friend; greater still be- 
cause of his consecrated life as a Christian. 
He was a true and humble child of God, a 
valiant soldier of the cross, ever holding 
up the banner of his King whom he loved 
and whom it was his joy to honor. 

He bore his afflictions with great Chris- 
tian fortitude, feeling that they were light 
when compared to the suffering of Christ, 
and little compared to the glory that await- 
ed him in the beyond. For his wonderful 
faith, like the faith of Moses, made him to 
rely on the promises of God, and to trust 
him. 

He was specially gifted mentally and 
spiritually, was a deep thinker — impressive 
talker, and endowed with great ability as 
a writer. Many who never knew him 
have enjoyed his published articles. Be- 
sides, he had an extensive correspondence 
with friends in and out of his own state. 
From a literary standpoint his letters to 
his Pastor, Eld. J. T. Satterwhite and 
church friends were gems — the kind one 
never wants to destroy but to preserve 
and re-read with the reward each time of 
finding new comfort and new food for 
thought. They were indeed vivid portray- 
als of the life and character of the writer. 
His influence in this way, and in many 
others, will live on and on. For the scrip- 
tures tell us that "Blessed are the dead 
which die in the Lord from hence forth; 
yea saith the spirit, that they may rest 
from their labors; and their works do fol- 
low them." 

He was born in Randolph Co., Ala. Aug. 
5th, 1855, was the son of William P. and 
Ann (Moore) McGinty. When quite young 
his parents moved to Chambers Co., Ala., 
near Rievrview where he lived about forty 
years. Leaving this City in 1900, he lived 
for a <imp at eafh of the following places, 
Lanett, Ala., Opelika, Ala.; Birmingham, 
Ala., and Lagrange, Ga. Finally in 1924 
he moved to Chatsworth, Ga. He soon 
earned the confidence of the people there 
to the extent that they elected him Mayor 
three times without opposition. Among 
the beautiful floral offerings was one from 
the City Officers of Chatsworth, and one 
from the business men of Chatsworth. 

In 1896 he joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Ephesus, near Riverview, Ala., 
and was baptized by Eld. W. R. Avery — 
made in all the years following a useful 



member. He was a staunch defender of 
the principles of his church — was early in 
his church life made a deacon, which of- 
fice he filled ably. As a leader he was 
often consulted by younger members, as to 
the doctrines, practice, etc., of the church, 
to whom he gave sound and fatherly ad- 
vice and instructions. He was as far as 
he could be, liberal in helping with the 
finances of the church. 

In 1885 he married Miss Laura Spikes, 
who died at Chatsworth in 1925. In 1926 
he married Miss Capes Webb who survives 
him. Besides his widow he leaves three 
sons, Rupert A. McGinty head of the Hor- 
ticultural Department of Clemson College, 
Clemson, S. C; J. Foy McGinty, publisher 
of the Calhoun Times, Calhoun, Ga.; 
Roland McGinty, connected with the At- 
lanta Georgian, Atlanta, Ga., seven grand- 
children, two sisters, and four brothers. 

At the time of his death, he was a mem- 
ber of LaGrange Primitive Baptist Church 
where his funeral was held. His Pastor, 
on account of feebleness could not be pres- 
ent, so services were conducted by Elder 
J. W. Dempsey, Dalton, Ga., and Elder J. 
W. Harmon, Opelika, Ala. He was laid 
to rest by the side of his first wife at La- 
Grange, Ga. Dec. 3rd, 1930 there to await 
the morning of the resurrection, when the 
dead in Christ shall arise and meet him in 
his glory. 

Written by request of LaGrange Church, 
Mrs. F. J. Pike, 
Deacon G. L. Moore. 



MARGARET LEE. 

Margaret Lee was born in Johnston 
County in 1855. We don't know the day 
of her birth as the old family Bible was 
stolen. She died Nov. 29, 1930. She was 
living with one of her sons at or near Elm 
City at the time of her death. 

She joined the church at Fellowship, 
Johnston County, on Saturday before the 
first Sunday in May, 1912. 

She leaves to mourn her departure two 
sons, three brothers and a lot of nieces 
and nephews, but we trust our loss is her 
eternal gain. 

She had been in feeble health for sever- 
al years, not able to attend her meetings 
very often, but would try to come once or 
twice a year as long as she lived. 

She will be missed by her family and 
the church. 

1st, Resolved that we the members at 
Fellowship bow in humble submission to 
the will of our Lord and Saviour, Jesus 
Christ, who doeth all things well. 

2nd, Resolved that we deeply sympa- 
thize with the bereaved family in their sad 
hour of bereavement and trust that they 
may be enabled by Jesus Christ to put 
their whole trust in God, who is tlie autlior 
of all good works. 

3rd, Resolved that a copy of these reso- 



142 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



lutions be spread on our church record 
and a copy sent to Zion's Landmark for 
publication. 

Done by order of the church in confer- 
ence Saturday before the first Sunday in 
February, 1931. 

Elder Xure Lee, Moderator, 

J. C. Langdon, Clerk, 

G. W. King and wife. Com. 



ELDER WILLIAM A. GOURLEY 

This is written in loving remembrance 
of our dear father, Elder William A. 
Gourley, who departed this life July 29th, 
1930. He was eighty years, nine months 
and 13 days old, and had been in declin- 
ing health for quite a number of years. 
But only for the last few months before 
the end came had he been almost past 
going and very near helpless. He lived 
the latter part of his life with his young- 
est son and daughter-in-law, William and 
Beatrice Gourley, and they bestowed upon 
him all the patient love and tender care 
that a son and daughter could. "He that 
giveth so much as a cup of water to one 
of mine shall not lose his reward." We 
feel that he was fully prepared to go and 
is much better off than those he left be- 
hind and that our loss is his eternal gain. 

Our father, dear father, has left us 
And gone to climes above. 
He's gone to live eternally 
With Jesus and his love. 

No more we'll see his patient face. 
While here on earth we stay, 
But let us hope to meet him there. 
When we are called away. 

We miss him, oh so very much. 
But would not wish it so, 
That he were back in this vain world 
Of suffering, sin and woe. 

We know that he has only paid 
A debt which we all owe. 
While we are toiling, toiling on, 
In sadness here below. 

Oh, let us hope some day to meet 
Our father dear above. 
And dwell with him forever. 
Where all is peace and love. 

By his devoted daughter, 

Lily M. Conner, 

Brown Summit, N. C. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas it has been the will of our 
heavenly Father to take from us our be- 
loved sister, Rosa Alice Fox, who departed 
this life March 19, 1929, making her 
stay on earth 66 years, 9 months and 6 
days. 

Sister Fox united with the church at 



Stories Creek in June, 1890 and was a 
faithful member until death. She was a 
firm believer in the doctrine of Salvation 
by grace and it seemed to be her greatest 
pleasure in meeting Avith the brethren and 
sisters and talking of the goodness and 
the mercies of God. 

Therefore be it resolved. 

First, that in the passing of Sister Fox, 
we feel that the Church has lost a faithful 
member, but we feel that our loss is her 
eternal gain. 

2nd, We extend to the family our deep- 
est sympathy. 

3rd, that a copy of these resolutions be 
recorded in our church record, and a copy 
be sent to Zion's Landmark for publica- 
tion. 

Done by order of church in conference 
at January meeting, 19 31 

Elder L. J. Chandler, Mod. 
Ed. Clayton, Clerk. 



D. C. LFNSrORD. 

D. C. Lunsford was born at Surls, N. C, 
Dec. 22, 1837. His parents were John L. 
Lunsford and Sallie Ann Davie Lunsford. 
He died at the home of his son Y. C. Luns- 
ford, Jan. 13, 1931, making his stay on 
earth 93 years and 22 days. 

Three years ago last May he fell in the 
yard and was never off his bed again. 

But he never murmured or complained. 

Dec. 13, 18 60 he was married to Nannie 
Jane Cozart and of this union there were 
S children, all living to be grown except 
two who died in infancy and one married 
daughter who died several years ago. 

He lived all his life on a farm near 
where he was born except the time he was 
in the Civil War and 8 months in a north- 
ern prison at Elmyra, New York. Uncle 
Crock was a lovable man. He loved his 
church, home, wife, children and neigh- 
bors. 

He was very hospitable, always met you 
witli a smile at the gate if he could get 
tl'.ere. Always ready to do a service to 
any one in distress and lend a helping 
hand to the needy. 

He will be greatly missed in his com- 
munity where he was much loved and ad- 
mired for his humble, quiet, upright life. 

He held his membership with old Flat 
River church near Roxboro, N. C, one of 
our oldest churches. 

I feel this notice would not be complete 
if I did not mention the love and care be- 
stowed on him during his sickness by his 
daughter, Lucy. I don't think I ever saw 
more love and devotion than she bestowed 
on him through his long illness. 

He leaves besides his children and grand 
children, several great grandchildren, 
numerous nephews and nieces. 
He was the last of his father's family. He 
was buried in the family cemetery beside 
his wife and near other loved ones. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



143 



"Well done good and faithful servant. 
Thou hast been faithful over a few things, 
1 w Ul make thee ruler over many things: 

■ r thou into the joy of thy Lord." Mat. 

■ :i - -'1. 

; ovingly submitted to his children. 
i;y Ills niece who loved him, 

Nannie F. Carrington, 
Durham, N. C. 



CHARITY PARTIN LASSITER. 

Charity Partin Lassiter, wife of Willis 
Alfred Lassiter of near Smithfield, depart- 
ed this life on November 27, 1930, follow- 
ing a brief illness of pneumonia. She 
was taken suddenly ill on the night of No- 
vember 21 and was critically ill from the 
beginning. 

"Then fell upon the house a sudden gloom, 
A shadow on those features fair and thin. 
And softly, from that hushed and dark- 
ened room, 
Two angels issued where but one went 
in." 

The thtrd daughter of Elder Aldridge 
and Malinda Stewart Partin of Wake Coun- 
ty, she was born on April 14, 1855. Had 
she lived until April she would have been 
76 years old. On October 25, 1876, she 
married Willis Alfred Lassiter, and to this 
union were born nine children, eight of 
whom survive: C. A. Lassiter of Wild- 
wood, Fla; Dr. C. L. Lassiter of Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn.; Mrs. Lillie Johnson, Mrs. 
J. A. Smith, and Miss Flossie Lassiter of 
Sm.ithfield; A. B., Seth W., and W. Kirl 
Lassiter of near Smithfield. 

Adhering to the faith of her fathers, she 
united with the Primitive Baptist church 
at Clement near Four Oaks in early 
womanhood under the preaching of Elder 
Louis Adams, and she remained a faithful 
and devout member until the end, attend- 
ing the last service held there before her 
death. After a long, busy and useful life 
she died as she had lived — respected, 
trusted, and loved. Her hand was never 
weary and her step never failed in minis- 
tering unto, caring for, and waiting upon 
those who were in any way dependent up- 
on her. She was ever patient, faithful, 
and self-sacrificing; ever unassuming, 
modest, and retiring. With a beautiful 
Christian faith that never doubted or wav- 
ered, she ran life's journey here on earth, 
each year growing gentler and sweeter. 
Her last years were passed tranquilly and 
serenely, in perfect faith and trust in God. 

The funeral was held at the homo on 
the afternoon of November 28, and inter- 
ment was made in the cemetery at Clem- 
ent church, conducted by her pa.stor, El- 
der L. H. Stephenson. The remains were 
tenderly laid to rest beneath a mound of 
beautiful flowers, tributes of respect from 
a host of friends. 

"God touched her with his finger, and 
she slept," 



:\rARTHA ELIZABETH CHANDLER 

With a sad heart I will attempt to write 
the death of our dear mother. She was 
born July 14 , 1854, died November 21, 
193 0, age 76 years, 4 months and 7 days. 
She was the daughter of William and Su- 
san Vaughn of Caswell County, N. C. She 
was married to Elder Y. I. Chandler at 
the age of about 18 years and lived happily 
with him until 19 23 when the Lord called 
him home to himself. She leaves to 
mourn their loss 4 daughters and two 
sons, namely, Mrs. M. S. Fitch, Mrs. A. H. 
n. King, Mrs. W. A. Pruitt, Mrs. . W. 
Rudd, J. B. and J. Y. Chandler. Two sis- 
ters. Mrs. L. L. Roscoe and Mrs. J. A. Al- 
dridge and a host of grandchildren and 
great grandchildren and friends. 

After father died she broke up house- 
keeping and made her home with the 
writer but stayed with all her children 
which she enjoyed so much. She was 
taken sick while visiting her daughter, 
Mrs. A. H. D. King and remained there 
about ten days, then she was brought back 
to her old home place, when she seemed 
to want to die. She only lived about a 
week after coming home. 

She never did join the church because 
she thought .she wasn't good enough. I 
I have no doubt but what she is at rest, and 
I only hope that I will meet her with my 
Saviour. She would feast upon his many 
rich promises and rejoiced in salvation by 
free unmerited grace. This was the doc- 
trine she loved and believed and her dear 
ones feel confident that she has entered 
into the joys of her Lord forever. 

Dear mother how we miss you. We 
know other people will miss you, to whom 
you so cheerfully helped in every way you 
could, but you have done what you could, 
and your works are proof that your life 
was not in vain. May God enable the be- 
reaved to live as well as you did, die as 
calmly and triumphantly and be forever 
with Him and the redeemed where part- 
ings are unknown. 

The funeral services Avere conducted by 
Elder W. C. King and Elder Ben Martin 
at Bush Arbor Church, and the body was 
laid tenderly to rest in the cemetery be- 
side her dear husband. 

There is not a doubt in my mind but 
victory she obtained. 

Although she left us behind, we hope to 
meet again. 

Written by her son, 

J. Y. CHANDLER. 



MILL BRANCH UNION. 

The Mill Branch Union is to convene 
with the church at Tabor Saturday and 
5th Sunday in March. 

M. MEARES. 



144 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



UNION MEETING AT FELLOWSHIP 

The next session of the Angier Union is 
appointed to be held with the Church at 
Fellowship, Johnson County, Saturday and 
fifth Sunday in March, 1931. Elder E. C. 
Jones is chosen to preach the introductory 
sermon and Elder T. F. Adams is alter- 
nate. 

Fellowship Church is located about ten 
miles east of Angier and about three- 
quarters of a mile south of the Angier 
Smithfield road. 

All lovers of Truth are invited to meet 
with us, especially the ministering 
brethren. 

W. F. YOUNG, Union Clerk. 

Angier, N. C. 



LINVILLE UNION. 

The next session of the Linville Union is 
appointed to be held with the Primitive 
Baptist church at Tom's Creek Davidson 
County, N. C, on Saturday and Fifth Sun- 
day in March 1931. This church is lo- 
cated near Denton, N. C. 

Invitation is extenaed to brethren, sis- 
ters and friends to meet with us, and a 
special invitation is extended to our min- 
istering brethren. 

W. L. TEAGUE. 



EASTERN LITTLE RIVER UNION. 

The Eastern Little River Union will be 
held with the church at Little Creek, 
Johnston County, N. C, on Saturday and 
5th Sunday in March, 1931. Elder E. F. 
Pearce is appointed to preach the intro- 
ductory and Eld. T. F. Adams appointed 
his alternate. 

Brethren, sister, friends, and especially 
ministers are cordially invited to attend. 
Respectfully yours, 

J. A. BATTEN, Union Clerk. 
Clayton, N. C, R. 1. 



BLACK CREEK UNION 

The next session of the Black Creek 
Union will be held the Lord willing, with 
the church at Sandy Grove, Nash Co., N. C, 
Saturday and fifth Sunday in March, 1931. 
Visitors will be met at Bailey and Spring 
Hope. All lovers of peace and good order 
are invited to attend. A special invita- 
tion is extended to ministers. 

Isaac A. Lamm, 

Union Clerk. 



BLAOK RIVER UNION. 

Editors Zion's Landmark: 

Please publish in your paper that the 
next session of the Black River Union is 
appointed to be held with the church at 
Primitive Zion meeting house in Harnett 
County, N. C, on the 5th Sunday and Sat- 
urday before in March 1931. The church 
is situated about 5 miles west from Ben- 
son and Dunn, N. C. Good roads traverse 
the section from most all directions. A 



general invitation extended and especially 
to Baptist ministers. 

W. V. BLACKMAN 
Benson, R. 2, N. C. 



THE SKEWARItEY UNION 

The next session of the Skewarkey 
Union is appointed to be held with the 
church at Conoho, near Oak City, Martin 
County, N. C, commencing on Friday be- 
fore the fifth Sunday in March and con- 
tinue through Saturday and Sunday. Visi- 
tors will be met at the trains Friday and 
Saturday. All lovers of the truth are in- 
vited. 

B. L. JOHNSON, Church Clerk. 



THK ("OM'KXTXEA UNION. 

Tile 2:JStli[ Scssicn ol' f he Contentnea 
riiiuii was appointed io lip held with the 
cliurJi ai the Mea.low, Greene Co.. N. C, 
Hie fiflh Siiiulay and Saturday before in 
March, 1931. 

Elder W. B. Kearney was chosen to 
preach the introductory sermon and Elder 
Luther Joyner as alternate. 

The Meadow Church Is situated 4 miles 
west of Farmville, one half mile south of 
No. 90 Highway. 

A special invitation is extended to our 
ministering brethren. 

J. E. MEWBORN, 
Union Clerk. 



t ^f'^^ MEETING AT I FJJ.OWSHIF 

'i lie next session of the Angier Union is 
ixppomted to be held with the Church at 
relloNv^hii), Jolinsou County, Saturday and 
i| '!i simd.ay in March. 1931. Elder E. C. 
ioiiMs IS chosen to preach the introductory 
sermon and Elder T. F. Adams is alter- 
nate. 

Fel'owslii]! ('!iur(di is located about ten 
nu.es I as! oi Angier and about three- 
ruiaiteis ol a mile south ot the Angier- 
fJniUhricld road. 

A:i lovei-s ot the Truth are invited to 
meet \<uli us, especially the ministering 
jji-cilireii. 

W. F. YOUNG, 
Union Clerk. 

.\iv^u'v. N. C. 



( REEK .\SS()( I.ATION 

'ihe Spring Session of the Bear Creek 
l\im.tive r.aiiti: ( Association is to convene 
wifa iii. : ai Running Creek, Stanly 

* "e" ennencuig on Saturday 

I'- : ' ■ e .11 May 1931 and con- 
' ':i.v 2iid, ,ird. and 4th. 

i! iauce desiring to attend 
P'' ■ •• instructions, to brother 

•I : ! . .Mount Pleasant, N. C. 

' ' - • ' i'l e.i 1 (>xteiided to brethren, 

si.ler, and Iraei is to attend. 

,J. \V. JONKS, 

Association Clerk. 

Peachland, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 



WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 

VOL. LXIV. APRIL 1, 1931 No. 10 

ELISHA BRINGS THE CHILD TO LIFE 

"And when Elisha was come into the house, behold, the child was dead, 
and lay upon his bed. 

He went in therefore and shut the door upon them twain, and prayed 
unto the Lord. 

And he went up, and lay upon the child, put his mouth upon his mouth, 
and his eyes upon his eyes, and his hands upon his hands: and he stretch- 
ed himself upon the child; and the flesh of the child waxed warm. 

Then he returned and walked in the house, to and fro; and went up, 
and stretched himself upon him: and the child sneezed seven times, and 
the child opened his eyes. 

And he called Gehazi, and said. Call this Shunamite. So he called 
her. And when she was come in unto him, he said, take up thy son. 

Then she went in, and fell at his feet, and bowed herself to the ground, 
and took up her son, and went out. — 2 Kings, 4:32-38. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 

$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. 0. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



2)evote& to the Cause of S^esus Cbcist 



"STAND FAST IN THE FAITH." 

"Who bear record of the Word 
of God, and of the testimony of 
Jesus Christ, and of all things that 
he saw." "Blessed is he that read- 
eth, and they that hear the words 
of his prophecy, and keep those 
things which are written therein for 
the time is at hand." "The seven 
candlesticks were seen by John; of 
which he said." "And in the midst 
of the seven candlesticks, one like 
unto the Son of man clothed with a 
garment down to the foot and girt 
about the paps with a golden gir- 
dle." "And he laid his right hand 
upon me saying: "Fear not, I am 
the first and the last: I am he that 
liveth, and was dead; and behold I 
am alive forevermore; Amen; and 
have the keys of hell and of death." 
"The mystery of the seven stars 
which thou sawest in my right 
hand and the seven golden candle- 
sticks;" "The seven stars are the 
angels of the seven churches." The 
angels of the seven churches are 
the chosen, called, and qualified 
ministers of the Lord Jesus Christ. 
The seven churches represent the 
Church as a whole embraced in the 
mystical number "seven." Seven 
in the scriptures, denotes a finished 
and complete number; a unit, one 
standard amount of quantity; and I 
shall add quality, also. The seven 
candlesticks, I think, represent the 
church in its fulness, perfection, 
complete, resplendent: doubtless 
embrace the innumerable company 



that John saw around the throne in 
heaven. Jesus spake concerning 
the church in his "Sermon on the 
Mount; which embraces the 5th., 
6th., and 7th chapters, according to 
the gospel of St. Matthew — to wit: 
"Ye are the light of the world; a 
city that is set on a hill cannot be 
hid." "Neither do men light a 
candle and put it under a bushel; 
but on a candlestick; and it giveth 
light unto all that are in the house." 
"Let your light so shine before men 
that they may see your good works, 
and glorify your Father which is in 
heaven." There is no glory, nor 
honor due the children; they are 
but a reflection of the "Light of the 
knowledge of the glory of God, in 
the face of Jesus Christ." His 
power, alone, makes them kings 
and priests unto God; -he gives them 
grace to become his own; which 
was given them in Christ Jesus be- 
fore the world began." He clothes 
them with his garment even down 
to the foot — the very lowest place. 
The Church is Christ's body — his 
Bride; he is her Head: from which 
Cometh all authority — all power — 
all wisdom, and all knowledge; The 
Beginning — The Life — The Top— 
The Cornerstone: Jesus is head 
over all things; for whom cometh 
all things." Faith, Hope, Charity — 
these three — but the greatest of 
these is Charity. Charity covers 
our brethren from head to foot; 'tis 
the garment of the righteousness of 
Jesus Christ: and when God's chil- 



146 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



dren are covered with it by His Al- 
mighty power, and mercy; they do 
not see through the flesh; but 
through His spirit; then does their 
love flow out — pure and unfeigned 
— to forgive every fault: "In honor 
prefering one another in love." 
"Charity beareth all things, believ- 
eth all things, hopeth all things, en- 
dureth all things." "Charity never 
faileth." It reaches with love from 
those of high estate in the church 
to the poorest, the lowliest, the most 
unlearned; it is the garment that 
John saw: that covered from head 
to foot: This "Son of man was girt 
about his paps with a golden gir- 
dle." From the paps — (breasts) 
comes all nourishment — all life and 
living for the poor, weak, lowly and 
helpless children of the Most High; 
entirely dependent upon him for 
everything. These paps were girt 
with a golden girdle. Jesus was 
this "Son of man" : who was tried 
as no other has or ever will be tried 
— and came out of it all as Pure 
Gold — and was made more precious 
than fine gold: "Yes, a man richer 
than the gold of Ophir" : possessing 
duration, the incorruptibility — and 
the strength of the subject to which 
gold is applied. "The precious 
sons of Zion of worth equal to the 
purest gold." The little ones of the 
kingdom are encircled with this 
golden girdle. A girdle reaches 
all 'round; typifying eternity — eter- 
nal love .of God the Father, and is 
also a symbol of strength, activity, 
and power, 'tis the Arm of God; 
with which these dear ones are en- 
circled with the Golden Girdle of 
His salvation : are nourished by His 
"paps" — His grace — His eternal 
love; which he freely gives, to his 
poor — who feel so undeserving; yet 
"Are saved and called by Him who 



is able to do exceeding, abundantly 
all that we ask, or think, according 
to the power that worketh in us; 
unto Him be glory in the church by 
Christ Jesus through all ages, world* 
without end. Amen." "And 
hereby we do know that we know 
him if we keep his commandments." 
The commandments of Christ are 
given unto the church; and the 
church should be governed by his 
precepts and examples. Jesus said: 
"I have not spoken of myself; but 
the Father which sent me; he gave 
me a commandment what I should 
say, and what I should speak." 
"And I know that this command- 
ment is life everlasting: whatso- 
ever I speak therefore even as the 
Father saith unto me, so I speak." 
The two last paragraphs are special 
words of Jesus just before the pass- 
over and the washing of his dis- 
ciples' feet. Feet washing is a 
most impressive ordinance: and was 
established by the Lord Jesus 
Christ. John 13:12, 13, 14, 15, etc. 
So after he had washed their feet, 
and had taken his garments, and 
was set down again ; he said unto 
them: "Know ye not what I have 
done to you?" "Ye call me Mas- 
ter and Lord: and ye say well; for 
so I am." "If I then, your Lord 
and Master, have washed your feet; 
ye ought also to wash one another's 
feet." "For, I have given you an 
example, that ye should do as I 
have done to you." The Lord Jesus 
would not have said ye ought to do 
a thing unless it is his will for you 
to obey. "Ought" means: to be 
under obligations, bound by duty — 
should do. "Verily, verily, I say 
unto you, the servant is not greater 
than his Lord; neither he that is 
sent, greater than he that sent him." 
If ye know these things, happy are 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



147 



ye if ye do them." Feet washing is 
an example given by the Lord Jesus 
Christ, just before his being offered 
up. Do we not obey the last re- 
quests of a natural friend who pass- 
es away? Is not feet-washing a 
duty or obligation, an example that 
the Saviour has left on record? In- 
deed it is an Ancient Landmark not 
set by our fathers; but by the One 
who has died for the salvation of 
his people; and we hope that we, 
too, are embraced in his covenant 
of grace. Feet washing is a sym- 
bol of humility; coupled with love; 
and when we are really humble, we 
are at the feet of the brethren; so 
much so that we desire to wash 
their feet; and if we "love the 
brethren," I feel that we cannot re- 
fuse to carry out the example that 
the Saviour set. Let me again re- 
peat; to wit: "For I have given you 
an example that ye should do as I 
have done to you. 1st Peter. 2:8. 
Has Jesus become "A stone of 
stumbling, and a rock of offence, 
even to them which stumble at the 
word; being disobedient: where- 
unto, also, they were appointed?" 
"Honor all men ; love the brother- 
hood, fear God." "Honor the 
king." "For if these things be in 
you and abound, they make you 
that ye shall be neither barren nor 
unfruitful in the knowledge of our 
Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ." Is 
it possible that some one will accuse 
me of fault-finding? If they do I 
cannot help it. God forbid that I 
should be guilty of such a thing. 

I feel too small, too unworthy to 
present anything pertaining to the 
order of the house of God; but I 
hope I love the cause, and am deep- 
ly concerned in the welfare there- 
of; and regret that all the churches 
do not observe the ordinances, the 



examples that are laid down by the 
Saviour himself. I repeat his own 
words again; to wit: "If I then, 
your Lord and Master have washed 
your feet; ye ought, also, to wash 
one another's feet." "For I have 
given you an example, that ye 
should do as I have done to you." 
Jesus also says: "Ye are the salt of 
the earth: but if the salt have lost 
its savour wherewith shall it be 
salted? It is thenceforth good for 
nothing, but to cast out and to be 
trodden under foot of men." Must 
I say that the Church, the salt of 
the earth is losing its savour? 
Savour means influence, tokens of 
things, characteristic quality. One 
of the characteristic qualities, that 
the Primitive Baptists used to stand 
for; was the inherent, innate, prin- 
ciple of justice toward their fellow- 
man — the payment of their debts. 
Romans 13:7, 8, "Render therefore 
to all their dues : tribute to whom 
tribute is due : custom to whom cus- 
tom; honor to whom honor." "Owe 
no man anything, but to love one 
another; for he that loveth another 
hath fulfilled the law." "There- 
fore, whatsovere ye would that men 
should do to you, do ye even so to 
\hem, for this is the law, and the 
>jrophets." Romans 12:16, 17, to- 
wit: "Recompense to no man evil 
for evil. Provide things honest in 
the sight of all men." "If it be 
possible, as much as lieth in you, 
live peaceably with all men." Let 
me repeat that all may understand. 
"If these things be in you, and 
abound, they make you that ye shall 
neither be barren nor unfruitful in 
the knowledge of our Lord Jesus 
Christ." "But he that lacketh these 
things is blind, and cannot see afar 
off; and hath forgotten that he was 
purged from his old sins." I have 



148 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



been thinking of the difference be- 
tween the leavened and the un- 
leavened bread, so much; and wish- 
ed some of our able writers would 
express themselves regarding same. 
I feel so sinful, helpless, and — so 
unworthy to present my thoughts 
upon matters of such deep moment 
to the church ; when there are so 
many who write beautifully and en- 
couragingly to the household of 
faith ; that I am almost persuaded 
to write no more; but I trust you 
will bear with me. Luke 22:7, to- 
wit: "Then came the day of un- 
leavened bread when the passover 
must be killed." 1st Cor. 5:7,8, 
"Purge out therefore the old leav- 
en, that ye may be a new lump, as 
ye are unleavened. For even 
Christ our passover is sacrificed 
for us." Yes, he was taken by 
wicked men and slain; which was: 
"The determinate counsel and fore- 
knowledge of God." Isaiah 14: 
24-27. "The Lord of hosts hath 
sworn saying: Surely as I have 
thought, so shall it come to pass: 
and as I have purposed, so shall it 
stand." "For the Lord of hosts 
hath purposed, and who shall dis- 
annul it? And his hand is stretched 
out and who shall turn it back." 
Christ was the passover that was 
killed for his chosen peole; this 
was the time when the Lord found- 
ed Zion — "And the poor of his peo- 
ple shall trust in it." Why are they 
poor? Because they are unleaven- 
ed — by Christ — our passover. 
"Therefore let us keep the feast not 
with old leaven, neither with the 
leaven of malice and wickedness; 
but with the unleavened bread of 
sincerity and truth." Jesus was the 
unleavened bread of sincerity and 
truth. He had no power of his own 
but was made able, by the power 



given him of the Father — to rise 
from the dead; nothing pertaining 
to nature ; or the works of man had 
any part with him — nothing was 
added to him — he rose from the 
dead by the strength and power of 
his Father. Unleavened bread is 
made of crushed or ground grain — 
mixed with water — and baked with 
fire — three elements — grain, water, 
fire — neither of which can be made 
by man, but created by a God of 
purpose — God the Father — God the 
Son — and God the Holy Ghost — 
three officers in the God Head — 
and three elements in the unleaven- 
ed bread — Fire — Water — and 
Grain. The Grain has to be crush- 
ed, or ground — its life is taken; as 
was the life of Jesus Christ — a per- 
fect sacrifice. Bread is made of 
the ground grain. Bread signifies 
all things necessary for life and liv- 
ing: it is manna — and a symbol of 
Jesus Christ — gospel ordinances 
and privileges. 

Fire — A symbol of holiness and 
justice of God: is put for the Spirit 
and grace of Christ in its purifying 
operations. 

Water — is put for afflictions — 
people and nations — doctrines of 
the gospel — gospel ordinances and 
fulness of grace in Christ. Grain 
— Water and Fire — the only ele- 
ments that must be used in the mak- 
ing of unleavened bread; the least 
bit of soda leavens it as far as it 
goes; and man has a hand in the 
making of the soda, and the acid — 
which must be added, also, to make 
the bread light and fluffy to please 
the eye — and the taste of man also 
— then it is leaven bread. "A little 
leaven, leaveneth the whole lump." 
"Thus saith the Lord : Cursed is 
man that trusteth in man, and mak- 
eth flesh his arm, and whose heart 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



149 



departeth from the Lord." "For 
he shall be like the heath in the 
desert, and shall not see when good 
Cometh; but shall inhabit the parch- 
ed places in the wilderness, in a 
salt land, and not inhabi. ^. 
"Blessed is the man that trusteth in 
the Lord, and whose hope the Lord 
is." "Honor all men." Fear God. 
Honor the King." Love the Bro- 
therhood" — and strive not to bring 
reproach upon the cause — "And 
pay that thou owest." 

Submitted in love and deep con- 
cern for the welfare of Zion ; by one 
who feels too unworthy to pen 
these lines. Just bear with me if 
you can. 

LIZZIE HOLDEN GARRARD. 
Hillsboro, N. C. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

28 Willard St. 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Mr. John D. Gold, 

Much esteemed friend and pub- 
lisher of Zion's Landmark, a peace- 
making Primitive Baptist paper: 

I am enclosing a good letter from 
Elder J. J. Manley, of Texas. We 
have corresponded for several 
years, and I have felt that his let- 
ters to me have been very instruc- 
tive as well as spiritually and ex- 
perimentally comforting. He 
seems to be very careful to write in 
a spirit like the Master Christ, and 
I have the liberty to have it publish- 
ed and I place it in your hands if 
you desire to do so. You can divide 
it up in two issues if too lengthy. 

Yours in Christian love, 

D. M. Vail. 

P. S. — I am just up from a bad case 
of grip myself. My wife and 
daughter both were also sick in bed 



with the same but thank the good 
Lord we are all on the gain. 

D. M. VAIL. 



Wichita Falls, Tex. 

Eld. D. M. Vail, 

Binghampton, N. Y. 
Dear Bro. in the hope of the sure 
mercies of God: 

I was delighted, some time ago, 
at receiving a copy of the Signs of 
the Times and a few days later your 
good letter of the 10th. I have 
carefully and, I hope, prayerfully 
read the marked article in the Signs 
by C. M. Weaver. Your lettet 
awakened sweet confidence in my 
heart toward you, that both of us 
are taught by the same teacher. 
Who that teacher is, I know not. 
Yet sometimes I feel that He is the 
same who taught the apostles of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, for they spake 
the same things. I hope it is even 
so. How pleasant it is to be agreed ! 
How delightful to see eye to eye 
and to speak the same things! You 
remember Paul saying of Jesus, 
that — "though He were a Son yet 
learned He obedience by the things 
which he suffered. I used to heed 
the admonition, — "Read the scrip- 
tures and learn God's command- 
ments and His will toward man- 
kind, and thus be prepared to live 
righteously in this life by obeying 
his will and commands." But I 
found, and still find, in attempting 
to obey His precepts that, "I am 
carnal, sold under sin," and my 
obedience to them was only out- 
ward, being without sincerity of 
heart, but was dissimulation and 
hypocrisy. I feel that if my obed- 
ience is only external, — not from a 
loving desire of the spirit, it is then 
hypocrisy and becomes unright- 
eousness unto me, although it re- 



150 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



sembles and commends the right- 
eousness of God as revealed in the 
law. The law only demands bodily 
or outward personal righteousness, 
hence the apostle calls it the law of 
a carnal commandment. Such was 
the righteousness of the Jewish 
dispensation. 

In this view, we both agree with 
the apostle Paul when speaking of 
the advantage of the Jew. 

Including himself with the Jews, 
he said: "But if our unrighteous- 
ness commend the righteousness of 
Gd, what shall we say? Is God un- 
righteous who taketh vengeance? 
(I speak as a man) , God forbid : for 
how then shall God judge the 
world? For if the truth of God 
had more abounded through my lie 
unto his glory, why yet am I judged 
as a sinner?" etc. Rom. 3:5, 6, 7. 
Evidently the apostle refers not to 
the unrighteousness of murders, 
fornications, adultery, envyings, 
seditions etc., which do not com- 
mend the righteousness of God, as 
revealed in Moses' law, but to that 
of hypocrisy, dissimulation and pre- 
tension necessarily employed by 
those Avho obey only the letter of 
the law in their flesh. The same 
principle is also found in so called 
admonitions of the apostles to the 
saints anciently, and to the precepts 
of Jesus, recorded in the New Tes- 
tament. We find them in the letter 
recorded in the book, just as the 
law of Moses was engraved upon 
the tables of stone. Hence their 
power to guide and control the 
saints of this time, is no greater 
than were the engraved laws of 
Moses to lead Israel. We have the 
"letter" of both, and both "killeth." 
"But the words I speak they are 
spirit and they are life," Jesus said. 
God's laws and commandments are 



written in the mind and engraved in 
the hearts of all his children — no 
one has the advantage over the 
other. All are taught of the Lord, 
He is to them a God, and they are 
to Him a people, holy and without 
blame before Him in love. All 
things work together for good to 
them. They are perfected forever, 
because they are sanctified — for- 
ever cleansed by the blood of Christ. 
They are led in ways they knew not, 
and in paths they have not known. 
Darkness is made light before them, 
and crooked things straight. Isa. 
42:16. 

The world knoweih them not. 
They are not numbered with the 
nations. They are not under the 
law, but are children of liberty. 
They know the truth and it has 
made them free. The visible part 
of God's people are children of the 
first Adam brought into the family 
of the Most High by adoption. They 
still bear resemblance to their fore- 
parents, having inherited their de- 
pravity, their corruption and weak- 
ness as well as their enmity against 
God. The Apostle Paul denomi- 
nates it — "The old man." Yet, he is 
made a son and heir of God, by the 
quickening power of the life of 
Christ, — the two being made one, 
becomes the son of God. His sins, 
though they may be as scarlet are 
white as snow, and he is freely justi- 
fied and stands in the imputed 
righteousness of Christ by faith of 
the Son of God. Rejoicing in the 
hope of eternal life he is for the 
time completely subdued and glori- 
ously reconciled to God the father, 
feasting on the doctrine of His im- 
mutability and eternal sovereignty 
over all things in the heavens, and 
in the earth and in the seas and in 
all deep places. He feels for the 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



151 



time perfectly secure from all dan- 
ger of being lost or of being separ- 
ated from the love of God which is 
in Christ Jesus his Lord. But he 
must learn obedience. He thinks 
he knows the way of obedience, but 
he must be led in a way he has not 
known Alas he finds himself in 
the wilderness, and upon a long, 
fast, tempted with evils. His con- 
fidence and his strength are gone. 
Doubts pour in upon him. Here 
he begins the learning of real obed- 
ience by the things which he suf- 
fers — God's way — God's will. Paul 
became exalted over the abundance 
of his revelations. So do all the 
children of God. But the Lord 
knows how to keep his children 
from boasting and feeling that they 
are something, or are important of 
themselves in the flesh. 

They are led into the wilderness 
where there is no way, and into the 
thirsty land where there is no 
water For a time they are unable 
to feast upon the written word, the 
scriptures or upon the preaching of 
God's ministers, but as before 
stated, are led into the wilderness, 
even as their Redeemer was led, to 
be tried and to endure suffering, 
which is a way they had not known. 

Yea, "We did esteem him strick- 
en, smitten of God." The Bible and 
the preaching are as stones to 
them. "If thou be the Son of God 
command that these stones be 
made bread," is the tempters chal- 
lenge, — "You are no child of grace 
if you can not feast on the promises 
of God in the scriptures" says the 
messenger of the devil. But, after 
the long fasting and trying tempta- 
tions, when their hope is almost 
gone, Jesus makes His appearing 
and an angel ministers unto them, 
setting before them a feast of fat 



things, and they behold a way in 
the desert and the thirsty land be- 
comes a pool of water. The dark- 
ness becomes light and the crooked 
things straight. The written word 
becomes, to them, a glorious book 
testifying to the sufferings of 
Christ and his eternal love for his 
people. "Brethren count it all joy 
when ye fall into divers tempta- 
tions. — Jas. 1:2. 

It is through temptations that the 
saints discover the gospel of Christ 
wherein the righteousness of God is 
revealed from faith to faith, for it 
is the power of God unto salvation 
to every one that believeth. The 
saints therefore are perfected 
through suffering, until they see 
the hand of God in all things, what- 
soever Cometh to pass. It is then 
they realize in their hearts that, 
"Not a single shaft can hit, until the 
Lord of heaven sees fit." Even the 
hairs of their head are all number- 
ed. Not even a sparrow shall fall 
to the ground without Him. 

Job had been blessed with that 
perfection. 

He could say "I know." He 
never once ascribed his afflictions 
to Satan. I am persuaded that 
Paul also was blessed in like man- 
ner. He was able, after many re- 
peated sufferings, to say, — "We 
know that all things work together 
for good to them that love God, to 
them who are the called according 
to his purpose." Again, "For all 
things are yours, whether Paul, or 
Apollos, or Cephas, or the world, or 
life, or death, or things present, or 
things to come all are yours," etc. 
1 Cor. 3 :22. How glorious to us it 
would be, if at all times, we could 
recognize the hand of the all-wise 
and loving God in all that we do, 
think, say and suffer in our lives. 



152 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



It is evident that the author of 
the marked article in the "Signs", 
you sent me, has learned by experi- 
ence, that walking after the flesh, 
causes lamentable conditions among 
the saints. Already he has learned 
by the things he is suffering that: 
"Whenever and v^^herever man- 
made laws, rules, customs and tra- 
ditions are set up and enforced 
among God's children, confusion, 
strife and division invariably fol- 
low as a grievous result." He 
could have truthfully added: "En- 
forcement of any other kind of law 
will result likewise." The letter of 
the scripture could not effect obed- 
ience, like the suffering" for Paul 
had already said: "Put off the old 
man, which is corrupt acording to 
the deceitful lusts," Eph. 4.22. I 
agree with the writer when he in- 
sists, "that the most fruitful source 
of trouble among us," is in associa- 
tional bodies, because he believes 
such bodies are constituted by men, 
(the old man) , who also set up laws 
patterned after worldly govern- 
ments which are drag-on. I feel 
confident that further serious in- 
vestigation, will reveal to him, that 
the constituted, so called "Visible 
Church" is not a "Spiritual house, 
built up. A house the Lord has 
builded," but it likewise was con- 
stituted and disciplined by the same 
authority that constituted the asso- 
ciational body. For there is no 
limit to the size of a church accord- 
ing to the words of Jesus our Lord, 
"For where two or three are gath- 
ered together in my name, there am 
I in the midst of them." 

Therefore if a socalled associa- 
tional body be gathered together in 
the name of Jesus, there He is in the 
midst of them. The Bible testifies 
that the Lord dwells in Zion and 



"In the midst of the church will I 
sing praises unto thee." The con- 
clusion is that where two or ten 
thousand are gathered together in 
the name of Jesus, that gathering 
is a church of the Most High — Zion. 
"Church" signifies congregation — 
not necessarily a constituted body 
or assembly. We find no record of 
the constitution of a visible church 
in the New Testament. If the an- 
cient churches were constituted, no 
form for their setting up is left on 
record. The how, the number or 
names of the presbytery, the mod- 
erator and clerk, models of disci- 
pline and conducting conference, 
how a speaker shall act in confer- 
ence, proceedings against delin- 
quency of members, and immoral 
conduct of members, all these very 
important essentials are hopelessly 
omitted in the record. But we do 
find very many other incidents and 
transactions of far less importance 
(at a glance) minutely recorded in 
detail. — Flight into Egypt and re- 
turn of the infant Jesus. • Choosing 
of disciples by Jesus, — who they 
were and their occupations. Jesus' 
withdrawing himself, and where he 
went to pray. Jesus taking two of 
his disciples, — going about a stone's 
cast, etc., etc., we find in the life of 
Jesus as recorded by the four evan- 
gelists. Details of and reasons for 
the ordination of deacons. Paul's 
appeal to Caesar, — how long he 
stayed in Rome, and what he did 
while there. Paul's voyage to and 
from Rome and the occurrences on 
it. Peter's imprisonment, with the 
details of his release, etc., perhaps 
more than a hundred instances of 
similar importance might be cited. 
Yet nothing appears in the whole 
record about organizing or consti- 
tuting a visible church, which, evi- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



153 



dently, is as important as the ordi- 
nation of a few men as deacons. 
Therefore it is evident the early 
churches were not gatherings to- 
gether in the name of duties or obli- 
gations to God and to one another, 
imposed by a fixed law, but congre- 
gations of believers in Christ who 
"Are gathered together in My 
name," by the love of God in their 
hearts and for the saints, creating 
a victorious desire in their life to 
see one another, commune, talk and 
hear of their glorious Redeemer, 
who had delivered them from the 
law of sin, making them rejoice in 
the glorious liberty of the gospel. 
God worked in them both to will 
and to do of His own good pleas- 
ure. Therefore they worked out 
or manifested their own salvation 
with fear and trembling, which 
marked them then, as it does now, 
as God's chosen and beloved. Each 
esteemed others better than them- 
selves. In honor preferred one an- 
other. Each felt to be the chief of 
sinners, and less than the least of 
all saints. This is one reason why 
we have no record of their sitting 
in judgment against, and excluding 
members of the church for being 
overtaken in a fault, or for being 
"brought into captivity, to the law 
of sin, which is in my member." 
Their orderly walk and godly con- 
versation, their meekness and mani- 
festations of brother-love and kind- 
ness, made every one to glorify 
their Father which is in heaven, be- 
cause the light of each shined to the 
other, — not for obedience to the 
letter of the law, for the Gentiles 
had not the law. But because they 
reflected the glorious presence and 
beauties of the Lord in His temple, 
putting his living laws into their 
minds. "Know ye not that your 



body is the temple of God?" 1 Cor. 
3:16. 

You remember Solomon's tem- 
ple had two courts; an outer and an 
inner court. The latter was called 
the Holy of Holies and contained 
the golden censor, the golden can- 
dlesticks, the ark of the covenant, 
the cherubims, the mercy seat and 
indeed all the evidences and beau- 
ties of God's power and grace mani- 
fested in His temple — the bodies 
of His saints. But there was a veil 
over all these glorious beauties, hid- 
ing them from the vision of all 
Israel, including the priests of the 
temple, excepting the high priest, 
who only entered into it once a 
year. The holy prophets and wise 
men, — not even the kings of Israel 
ever entered or saw behind this 
veil in the flesh. Yet by faith, or 
the spirit of prophesy they 
were given sufficient view to 
praise God and foretell the 
coming of that day, when 
the prisoners should be set free and 
men would show forth in their 
bodies, the reigning power of the 
Lord without the letter of the law 
of carnal commandments, when the 
veil of the temple was rent in twain 
from the top to the bottom, it was 
then, He , (Jesus) "abolished in his 
flesh the enmity, even the law of 
commandments contained in ordi- 
nances" Eph 2:15. "The law and 
the prophets were until John ; since 
that time the kingdom of God is 
preached and every man presseth 
into it." Luke 16:16. This, the most 
marvelous incident ever recorded, 
and these quotations from the new 
testament here offered, are unan- 
swerable, showing that the saints 
have no need, further, for the let- 
ter of the law nor any law of men to 
keep them in the right way, — in- 



154 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



deed they are free, and the children 
of liberty. There are no obliga- 
tions resting upon them, but they 
are at perfect liberty to do what 
they desire, for the Lord is their 
King. His spirit guiding them in 
His own way which He would have 
them go. Working in them both to 
will and to do of his good pleasure. 

This incident also completely re- 
moves every vestige of grounds for 
constituted bodies, called visible 
churches or other bodies, for relig- 
ious work and administration of so 
called gospel discipline. It is also 
a profound rebuke against organ- 
izing such bodies. For law or dis- 
cipline is necessary to constituted 
bodies, and the law through the 
flesh restores the veil over the holy 
of holies in the membership, putting 
each in doubt of the other's sincer- 
ity, not knowing whether their good 
actions are prompted by the spirit 
of God, or forced upon them from 
fear of the penalties of the law. My 
joy and admiration cannot be ex- 
pressed by words, at my first at- 
tendance of an Old School Baptist 
Church. They were holy and pure 
in my eyes. — "Here" said I, "is the 
church of the most high God, the 
people — yes the children of the 
Lord God." What a delight to see 
them. My soul leaped for joy to 
meet them. A few months after- 
ward, I was chilled in my heart at 
hearing the clerk read the decorum. 
One article reading: "When a bro- 
ther chooses to speak in conference, 
he shall rise from his seat and ad- 
dress the brother moderator in a 
mild, Christian-like manner." I 
had heard brothers, beforehand, 
speak in that manner in conference 
and felt in my soul that it was 
Christ in them — (perhaps was) but 
after hearing the decorum the holy 



of holies was veiled by it in every 
one who spake in conference. O 
the warmth, the sweetness and joy 
in meetings where we know that 
each member is doing as he pleases, 
feels free from restraint of any kind 
and yet naturally does good and de- 
spises evil. We behold the image 
of Jesus in each, and we glorify our 
Father which is in heaven. 

But alas! the coldness, indiffer- 
ence and sometimes shame that 
come to us when a congregation 
contends for the law and expecting 
justification by the deeds of it, is 
presented to us. In their hearts 
they feel themselves better than 
others for they judge by the law; 
and in this respect are like the 
saints, they see others, but cannot 
see themselves as being like others. 
The difference being, — that the 
saints see the goodness of other 
saints, while law worshipers, judg- 
ing by the law which all disobey, 
see the sinfulness of the others, — 
judge and penalize (exclude) of- 
fenders. We have examples in the 
scriptures of the reign of the Lord 
in His gospel kingdom — the church 
in the world, showing His power 
over all flesh, to lead men without 
law, to do the things contained in 
the law as well as them that are 
under law; to cease from trusting in 
the law for true trighteousness and 
holiness. Jesus our Lord is head 
over all things unto the church. The 
head directs every action of the 
body. The body can do nothing 
without the head. 

A marvelous example of what 
the Lord does in His church or 
kingdom, is presented in the man 
who had broken chains and could 
not be bound, dwelling among the 
tombs. We now find him sitting, 
clothed and in his right mind. The 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



155 



prophets desired to see such glori- 
ous things but did not see them. 

But prudence suggests that I 
close this letter, and in conclusion 
will say that I find a marvelously 
accurate description of the so called 
visible church, predicted near two 
thousand years ago, in Rev. the 
13th chapter, beginning with the 
11th verse to the end of the chap- 
ter. Even the number is given. 
Likewise the last one of the seven 
stages of the church of God in the 
world, found in the same book and 
3rd chapter, 14th verse to end of 
chapter. 

Now I began this letter Dec. 24, 
but only had spare moments to fin- 
ish it. I see so much awkwardness 
in it I am ashamed to send it. But 
I hope you have the spirit of for- 
bearance and will pass over its im- 
perfections and I hope the Lord will 
bless you and your wife with the 
same comfort in reading the letter 
that I had in writing it. It was the 
article in the Times that called forth 
the subject about which I have, for 
several years, been interested and 
which has been fully settled in my 
mind, through the things which I 
have suffered in connection there- 
with. May this new year 1931 be 
a great and fruitful one to you and 
all the saints of the Lord. This 
leaves me and wife well, and hope 
for you a like blessing. 

As ever a poor sinner, 

J. J. MANLEY. 



93 YEARS OF USEFUL LIFE. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co., 
Wilson, N. C. 

Enclosed herewith check for one 
dollar and fifty cents foj which 
credit my subscription account and 
continue same to my Springfield, 
111., address. 



I have been confined to my room 
here for several weeks just from 
sheer physical weakness, with no 
pain or physical discomfort what- 
ever. 

When Spring comes I am encour- 
aged to think I may get out in the 
open again. Of this the good 
Father only knows. He holds my 
days in his own hands. I have 
much to be thankful for. 'These 
light afflictions which are but for 
a moment worketh for us a far 
more and exceeding eternal weight 
of glory." 

If I am spared until March first 
I will pass the 93rd birthday anni- 
versary. 

In surveying the years that have 
passed the guiding hand of the Lord 
is clearly seen along the entire way. 
My dear companion that went 
along with me for sixty five years, 
passed on three years ago and waits 
for me on the cloudless shores of 
immortality. 'Bless the Lord O my 
soul; all that is within me, bless 
his holy name." 

I only intended to write a busi- 
ness letter and find that I have in- 
truded on your time. 

Yours in gospel fellowship, pub- 
lished in the Landmark. 

Eld. J. G. Sawin. 

Waltson, 111. 



You have not intruded on our 
time. We are glad to receive this 
letter and to congratulate Elder 
Sawin on having lived such a long 
life of service in the cause of Christ 
and his fellow man. 

J. D. GOLD. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

My dear Christian friends: 

I feel that I want to say a few 
words in these perilous times of 



156 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



sadness and trouble. Although I 
have been cast down and am in the 
dark for a time I cannot feel that 
the Dear Lord has gone, withdraw- 
ing His presence from me. "How 
tedious and tasteless are the hours 
when Jesus no longer I see, 
Sweet prospects, sweet birds and 
flowers have lost their sweetness to 
me." Gloomy doubts and fears arise 
which cause me anxious thoughts, 
fearing that I am mistaken in this 
precious little hope I am clinging to, 
which I would not give in exchange 
for anything — 'tis all I have. 

Brethren, is there any one like 
me? Is it this way with you? If 
so, "fear not brethren, joyful stand, 
on the borders of your land. Christ, 
your Father's only son, bids you un- 
dismayed go on." Look over to Him, 
casting your eyes upon him. He 
will carry you safely through. He 
will a kingdom give and give it 
with delight. His feeblest child, 
his love shall call to triumph in His 
sight. His people are a peculiar 
people, zealous unto good works. 
The world calls them selfish, crazy, 
and ridic^^ them. Nevertheless, 
"'Mid sce^pof confusion and crea- 
tures' complaints, how sweet to my 
soul is communion with saints." 
There is nothing compared to the 
love of God. "Oh, for a closer walk 
with Him, a calm and heavenly 
frame. A light to shine upon the 
road that leads unto the Lamb." "As 
the heart panteth after the water 
brook, so panteth my soul after 
thee, O God." I desire to live a 
Christian life, but satan besets me 
so;'tis in much fear and trembling 
that I try to press onward, looking 
unto Him whom my hope is fixed 
upon. I have written for relief, as 
I felt impressed. 

Fannie Cobb Speight 



NOT IN OUR CHURCH HYMNS 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

A sister, Mrs. J. W. Daniels, and 
others requested of me, the enclosed 
excellent poem by John Newton. It 
not being in any of our church 
hymns, I am sending it to you for 
publication in Zion's Landmark. 

J. P. TINGLE. 



Mary To The Tomb. 

Mary to the Saviour's tomb, 

Hastened at the early dawn; 
Spice she brought and sweet per- 
fume; 

But the Lord she loved had gone. 
For a while she lingering stood, 

Filled with sorrow and surprise; 
Trembling, while a crystal flood, 

Issued from her weeping eyes. 
Jesus, who is always near, 

Though, too often unperceived, 
Came, her drooping heart to cheer, 

Kindly asking why she grieved. 
Though at first she knew Him not. 

When He called her by her name. 
She, her heavy griefs forgot; 

For she found Him still the same. 
And her sorrows quickly fled. 

When she heard His welcome 
voice; 

Christ had risen from the dead : 

Now He bids her heart rejoice. 
What a change His word can make, 

Turning darkness into day ! 
Ye who weep for Jesus' sake. 

He will wipe your tears away. 
He who came to comfort her, 

When she thought her all was lost 
Will, for your relief appear, 

Though you are now tempest- 
tossed. 

On His arm your burden cast. 

On His love your thoughts em- 
ploy; 

Weeping for a while may last. 
But the morning brings us joy. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



157 



Zion^s Landmark 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Elder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 
FU. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. NO. 10 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C, APRIL 1, 1931 



VALID BAPTISM. 

The Editor of the Primitive Bap- 
tist wrote an editorial lately with 
the above caption, concluding it by 
saying, "Which is the blackest, the 
pot or the kettle? Let us be care- 
ful not to contend for something 
that will unchurch ourselves. Let 
us be consistent." 

As the incident runs, as delin- 
eated, a preacher, by the name of 
Thomas, went from some eastern 
state to Texas, uniting with a gos- 
pel orderly church by letter; and 
after baptizing a number of people 
in the lapse of many years, it was 
discovered that Thomas was an im- 
postor, and had forged his letter. 
Then some of the churches had 
members baptized that he had dip- 
ped. Other churches took the posi- 
tion that as the baptisms were made 
by the authority of orderly churches 



they were orderly baptized. Then 
a council of leaders were called; 
and, "the council said that the bap- 
tisms administered by Thomas were 
valid because administered by gos- 
pel and orderly churches." This 
finding seems rather queer, that 
two administrators, Thomas and the 
churches, should have administered 
the baptisms in those churches. 

Unquestionably, the church has 
the sole right to receive, eject and 
discipline all persons under her 
purview ;but we had not known 
that the commission to preach the 
gospel in all the world, teach all na- 
tions, baptize believers, and teach- 
ing them to do and observe all 
things the Lord has commanded, 
nothing more, was to the churches; 
as. Matt. 28:19, 29; Mark 16:15; 
2 Tim. 4:1, 2; 1 Tim. 4:16; 6:3, 4, 
20. However, we are aware that 
the Catholic and Protestant church- 
es hold that the commission is to the 
church. Evidently, Christ holds 
the key of the house of David. 
(Isaiah 22:22; Rev. 1:18; 3:7.) 
Now, to His servants He gave the 
command and keys, saying, "What- 
soever," not whomsoeyejc, referring 
to the principles both"of doctrine 
and order that his servants should 
teach; as Matt. 16:19; 18:18; 
Mark 16:16; John 20:23. How 
strange that the children of the 
kingdom when questions arise re- 
specting true doctrine and order, do 
not go to the scriptures for the man 
of counsel instead of to a council of 
finite men. 

God hath said, "For the leaders 
of this people cause them (the 
churches) to err." Isaiah 9:16. For 
the most part, we know that when 
leaders agree upon matters, they 
do so, from compromise measures 
— give and take. Paul says the 



158 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



scriptures thoroughly furnish unto 
all doctrine, reproof and good 
works. (2 Tim. 3:16, 17). 'If any 
man speak, let him speak as the 
oracles of God." 1 Peter 4:11. 
"Hear Him in all things." Acts 3 :22. 
We have heard of some trying to 
vindicate the works of vile deceiv- 
ers, impostors, because the apostles 
did not repudiate the works of 
Judas, and those of the impostors, 
Thomas, who imposed upon the 
churches in Texas years ago, or the 
impostor who has lately figured in 
Florida, baptizing a few in two or 
three churches, though the charac- 
ter of Judas and these men may be 
very much alike. But Judas' acts 
were in the counsel of the Lord, 
and determined ages before Jesus 
chose him unto that purpose. Sure- 
ly there are none among us that be- 
lieve that the Lord purposed and 
the Holy Spirit led these impostors 
into their evil work. For the Mas- 
ter hath said: "And if he shall 
neglect to hear them, tell it unto 
the church: but if he neglect to 
hear the church, let him be unto 
thee as a heathen man and a pub- 
lican." Matt. 18.17. Thus we learn 
that the impostor's works are for- 
bidden, while Judas' works were 
ordained of the Lord. (Luke 22:22; 
Acts 2:23.) The Council of lead- 
ers may say, because the baptisms 
were authorized by orderly gospel 
churches the baptisms are in gospel 
order. Those who believe such 
prefer the word of men to that of 
the Lord. 

If a church were to agree for the 
agnostic Darrow, a Mohammedan, 
a Hindu, or any Pagan to baptize 

r members, such baptisms w - i ' 
be as orderly as would be those bap- 
tized by excluded preachers. It is 
true that some loose, unscriptural 



acts have been committed, and in 
the lapse of time too many changes 
took place before the disorders were 
known to be able to correct them. 
But no such disorders should be 
passed over, when discovered in 
time to correct by confessions and 
baptisms, as are the state of the few 
churches here, but we have hope 
that the disorders will soon be cor- 
rected. We trust the Primitive 
Baptists will ever hold the order of 
the church and the word of the 
Lord above the works of any man. 

M. L. GILBERT. 



ERRORS IN ARTICLE. 

My dear Friend J. D. Gold: 

In Landmark for March 1st, 
fourth line of my article, the word 
"employ," should be enjoy, and on 
second page 1st column, twenty- 
first line from bottom the word 
"world" should be word. This 
word "world" instead of "word" 
prevents the meaning. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



MRS. J. J. PAYNE 

It is with a sad and lonely heart that I 
attempt to write the obituary of my dear 
sweet mother, Ellie M. Payne, who de- 
parted this life on her birthday, January 
27th., 1931. She was born January 27th 
1856, making her stay on earth 75 years. 
She was married to Jno. Jackson Payne 
September 2, 1877. To this union were 
born eleven children, two dying when 
very young. She is survived by her hus- 
band and nine children, Mrs. Lena Davis. 
Mrs. W. W. Wells and Mr. D. P. Payne, all 
of Caswell Co., N. C, and Mr. W. S. Payne, 
O. M. Payne. Mrs. R. T. Stowe, Mrs. H. E. 
Aaron, all of near Whitmell, Virginia, and 
Mrs. I. N. Moorefield of Danville, Va., 37 
grandchildren, 4 great grandchildren, 2 
brothers, two sisters, and a large number 
of relatives and friend to mourn for her. 
But we mourn not as those without hope, 
for we believe she is asleep with Jesus. 
We do miss her so much. She was such 
a good and faithful mother, always giving 
her children good advice. Five of her 
children were at her side when the end 
came, and it was so hard to give her up 
to see the last breath leave her: never to 
smile or to speak again. But we thank 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



159 



God that it was his will to spare her for 
a life of usefulness to this ripe old age. 
Iler disease was heart-dropsy of which 
she had suffered nearly 2 years. It is oh 
so sad now to think of her and her vacant 
chair at home which never can be filled. 
But God has taken her out of this sinful 
world into His own presence. She cannot 
come to us again, but we can hope to go 
to her. 

She united with the Primitive Baptist 
church at Old Mountain in August, 1913, 
and was baptized by Elder T. N. Walton 
and loved that doctrine, saved by grace. 
The last Association she ever attended was 
at Malmaison Church in 1930, which she 
enjoyed so much. I've heard her say so 
many times that she had rather go to 
preaching than anywhere else, and always 
filled her seat at her meeting house when- 
ever .she could. Her body was laid to rest 
near the home, and her funeral was con- 
ducted by her pastor. Elder W. R. Dodd. 
I don't think I ever heard more appro- 
priate words used on such an occasion. He 
spoke so comfortingly to the bereaved 
ones. 

Precious Mother, you have left us. 
Left us, yes, for ever more, 
But we hope to meet you, 
On that bright and happy shore. 

Dearest Mother, you have left us. 
In this world to mourn and sigh, 
But beyond this world of sorrow. 
We hope to meet you in that sweet by 
and by. 
Written by her daughter, 

Mrs. W. W. Wells. 



SISTER MARTHA HELMS SHUMATE. 

By order of Town Creek Church in con- 
ference at the March meeting, 1931, we, 
C. L. Ross, C. L. Prillaman, and George L. 
Helms, were appointed to prepare a suit- 
able obituary of Sister Martha Helms Shu- 
mate. And in obedience to that order, we 
will write the same the best we can. 

She was the daughter of Daniel and 
Jane Helms and was born January 15, 
1842 and died November 13th 1930, mak- 
ing her stay on earth 88 years and 10 
months. 

When she grew to womanhood, she pro- 
f( ss(vl a hope in Jesus. Went before the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Union in 
Patiick County, Va., gave a reason for 
hopp in Jesus, was received and baptized 
with joy and gladness and was a faithful 
member 65 years. 

Sliortly after the War Between the 
-'t.itcs, she was married to Thomas Shu- 
iiiatc (a man of unimpeachable character). 
To tliis union 6 children were born, one 
<on and 5 daughters. One daughter pre- 
eded her to the grave. Her loving and 
'aithful husband was taken from her about 



38 years ago. After the death of her 
father in 189 8, she asked Union Church 
for a letter of dismission which was grant- 
ed. And by the same letter she was glad- 
ly received into the fellowship of Town 
Creek Church, where she remained a lov- 
ing and faithful member until the infirmi- 
ties of old age did its work. 

After her children were married, she 
broke up housekeeping and made her 
home with her son-in-law and daughter 
(Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Davis) at Henry, Va, 
And we, the committee, don't believe that 
any mother or mother-in-law ever had a 
better home. 

Sister Shumate's walk, talk and general 
deportment seemed to be a veritable mir- 
ror that reflected the light and love of a 
Christian woman. 

She leaves one son, 5 daughters, 19 
grandchildren, and 9 great grand children 
together with a host of relatives and 
friends. The floral display was beautiful 
and attested the love and friendship of 
relatives and friends of the deceased. 

Short burial services were conducted by 
Elders C. L. Ross and P. H. Johnson, after 
which her body was laid to rest by the 
side of her husband in the family burying 
ground. There to await the morning of 
the resurrection, when as we believe, she 
will come forth with the glorified throng. 
C. L. ROSS, 
C. L. PRILLAMAN, 
G. L. HELMS, Committee. 
(Lone Pilgrim please copy). 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

In writing these words to the memory 
of Elder W. M. Monsees, I am reminded 
that man born of woman is of few days 
and full of disappointments. But with 
patience and endurance, did he run the 
race set before him, ever looking to Jesus 
to guide and direct his feeble steps. 

Elder Monsees' religious proclivities 
were rich in the Christian faith. He served 
his churches well and was loved by all. He 
was, however, tolerant and broad-minded 
in his conviction. 

His death came after a declining of 
several years health. 

The churches which he served have en- 
tertained a great loss, but their loss is 
his eternal gain, and the Home not made 
with hands is awaiting to receive him. For 
on the morning of the resurrection when 
all the dead in Christ shall be raised to life 
immortal is given a body likened unto His 
Precious Body, then shall be brought to 
pass the saying that is written, death is 
swallowed up in victory. 
"Oh, Death, where is thy sting? 
Oh, Grave, where is thy victory?" 

May the God of grace enable all to bow 
in humble submission to His Holy and 
Righteous Will and may the consoling in- 



160 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



fluence of God's love comfort and console 
the bereaved family. 
Written by request. 

Ernest Clifton, 

Eld. J. B. Roberts, Moderator 
B. A. Highsmith, Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OP RESPECT. 

Whereas it has pleased our dear Heav- 
enly Father in His divine wisdom and 
love to call our dear brother, Thomas H. 
Cakes from his earthly home. 

Brother Cakes was born February 13, 
1842, and died December 27, 1930, mak- 
ing his stay on earth eighty-eight years, 
ten months and fourteen days. He vol- 
unteered for service in the Civil War at 
the age of eighteen. During his five 
years of service he received eight wounds. 

Brother Cakes and his wife joined the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Strawberry 
in April, 1875 and were baptized the fist 
Sunday in May by Elder W. S. McDowell. 
He was ordained as deacon of Strawberry 
Church in 1895. He was always faithful 
to his duty and filled his seat at his meet- 
ings as long as he was able. His funeral 
was conducted from the home of his 
daughter, Mrs. C. E. Parsons by his pastor, 
Elder W. R. Dodd and Elder Jim Stegall, 
and his body laid to rest in the lone and 
silent grave to await the morning of the 
resurrection. 

Therefore be it resolved: 

First: That by the death of Brother 
Cakes, Strawberry Church has lost a dear- 
ly beloved and faithful member. 

Second: That his daily life and conver- 
sation gave proof that he had passed from 
death unto life. 

Third: That a copy of the resolutions be 
placed on the Church records and a copy 
sent to Zion's Landmark for publication. 

Written by request of Strawberry 
Church. 

Eld. W. R. Dodd, Mod. 
P. H. Payne, Clerk, 
Mary Hundley, Writer. 



NOTICE OF THE DEATH OP 
BRO. G. R. DIXON. 

The subject of this notice was born 
Sept. 12th., 1861, in Pitt County, N. C, 
to William Dixon and Mary (Summerell) 
Dixon, and died in Greene County, N. C, 
May 24th., 1930. His widow, who is 13 
years his senior is now living. He left 
to mourn his departure, his widow, one 
brother, and one sister. Born of Free 
Will Baptist parentage, early in life, he 
connected himself with the church of his 
parents. 

He married Miss Jane Harper in 1882. 
No children survive this marriage. Short- 
ly after his marriage he saw his lost and 
ruined condition before his Maker and 
connected himself with the Missionary 
Baptist Church. This did not fill his hun- 



gry soul, so on the third Sunday in Sept. 
1913, he joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church at Hancocks and was baptized by 
Elder G. W. Stokes. He was steadfast in 
the faith as was taught by our Lord and 
Saviour till death. 

Now, therefore be it resolved, that the 
membership bows in humble submission 
to the will of Him who doeth all things 
well and no man can hinder. 

Resolved further, that a copy of these 
resolutions be spread on the church 
records, a copy be furnished his family, 
and a copy be forwarded to Zion's Land- 
mark for publication. 

Written by B. T. Cox, 

Eld. J. B. Roberts, Moderator 

B. A. Highsmith, Clerk. 



BEAR CREEK PRIMITIVE BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION. 

The Spring Session of the Bear Creek 
Primitive Baptist Association is appointed 
to convene with the church at Crooked 
Creek, Union County, N. C, near the little 
country village of Unionville, commencing 
on Saturday before first Sunday in May, 
1931 and closing Monday following. 
Crooked Creek Church is about 12 miles 
north of city of Monroe, N. C. A cordial 
invitation is extended to brethren, sisters 
and friends to attend. Those coming 
from a distance please get instructions 
from brother L. L. Little, Unionville, N. C. 

J. W. Jones, Associatin Clerk, 
Peachland, N. C. 

Notice in last months issue was an er- 
ror. It should have been Crooked Creek 
Church in Union County. 



APPOINTMENTS FOR ELDER WYATT. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 
My dear friend: 

I am sending you some appointments 
for myself. Please publish in the next 
issue of your paper. The Landmark, and 
oblige. 

At the North Fork Church at Pig River 
Association the first Saturday and Sunday 
in May, which will be May the 2nd and 
3rd. 

Danville, Va., the 4th at night. 

At Malmaison, Wednesday, May 6th. 

At Banister Springs, May 8th. 

At Galilee, May 9th. 

At Springfield, Sunday, May 10th. 

At Wetherford, Monday, May 11th. 

At Bethel, Tuesday, May 12th. 

At Rocky Mount, Wednesday at night, 
May 13th. 

Martinsville, Va., at night, May 14th. 

River View, at night, May 15th. 

At Spray^ N. C, May 16th and 17th. 

Please publish the above appointments 
as soon as you can. I beg to remain youi 
friend. 

J. W. WYATT, 

Selma, N. C. 



ZIQN^S LANDM ARK 

PUBLISHED S' ' MONTHLY 

WILSON. NORTH C/\i . '\ 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL bAPTIST 



LXIV. APRIL 15, 1931 NO. 11 



GOD ABLE TO ACCOMPLISH ANYTHING HE DESIRES. 

And Elisha came again to Gilgal: and there was a dearth in the land; 
and the sons of the prophets were sitting before him: and he said unto 
his servants set on the great pot, and see the pottage for the sons of 
the prophets. 

And one went out into the field to gather herbs, and found a wild vine, 
and gathered thereof wild gourds his lap full, and came and shred them 
into the pot of pottage; for they knew them not. 

So they poured out for the men to eat. And it came to pass as they 
were eating of thepottage, that they cried out and said, O thou man of 
God, there is death in the pot. And they could not eat thereof. 

But he said. Then bring meal. And he cast it into the pot; and he 
said, Pour out for the people, that they may eat. And there was no 
harm in the pot. 

And there came a man from Baal-Shalisha and brought the man of 
God, bread of the first fruits, twenty loaves of barley, and full ears of 
corn in the husk thereof. And he said, Give them unto the people, that 
they may eat. 

And his servant said, "What, should I set this before an hundred men? 
He said again, Give the people that they may eat: For thus saith the 
Lord, They shall eat and leave thereof. 

So he set before them, and they did eat, and left thereof, according to 
the word of the Lord." — Kings 4:38-44. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



£)epoteC) to the Cause of S^esus Cbdst 



THE GOSPEL TRUMPET. 

Subject — "In a moment, in the 
twinkling of an eye, at the last 
trump : for the trumpet shall sound, 
and the dead shall be raised incor- 
ruptible, and we shall be changed." 
—1 Cor. 15:52. 

Shall we consider the use and 
significance of "trumpets" in the 
old and new testaments to exam- 
ine "whether these things be so 
"regarding the claim by many that 
at the last day of time a trumpet 
shall be blown to signal all who are 
naturally dead and buried in graves 
of earth, to experience a resurrec- 
tion of those mortal bodies, and on 
that occasion we are to be called 
bef )re the judgment seat of Christ, 
to answer according to the deeds 
done in the body? 

The trumpet is mentioned many 
times in the Old Testament, and but 
four times in the new, and never 
meant anything to dead people, but 
was and still is of significance to 
those who are alive, for the "dead 
know not anything" so that the 
bl-^wing of one or a multitude o^ 
tiumpets can mean nothing save to 
li . ing characters, and not to all who 
were naturally alive, but to the 
chosen people of God alone did the 
blowing of these trumpets made of 
ram's horns signify anything, for 
the Jews alone of all the peoples of 
earth, had then, or have now spir- 
itually, the given of God under- 
standing to interpret the signals of 



joy or grief, of gladness or warning 
in times of war, or peace, or wor- 
ship. 

I repeat that no Gentiles, as such, 
were expected to understand or re- 
ceive benefit from the blowing of 
Jewish trumpets, which we use to 
prove that the proclamation of the 
gospel trumpet of the Son of God, 
is for the circumcised ear, and th' 
understanding heart, of the spirit- 
ual children of God, and no others, 
for to the others it is foolishness. 

Now to the particular trumpet 
mentioned in the above text, if not 
deceived, I heard it joyfully after 
being delivered from death, hell, 
and the grave, when as I hope, I 
had been raised from the dead in 
trespasses and sins — Eph. 2:1, to 
walk in newness of life, and in this 
new life there is no death, for this 
"life is hid with Christ in God" — 
Natural death is "but the gate to 
endless joy" when the mortal shall 
return to dust as it was, and the 
spirit to God who gave it." 

For years I heard a legal trumpet 
blow "to your tasks and to your 
burdens again" and time and again 
I heeded its signals, but since that 
day when I heard this message: 
"By grace are ye saved, through 
faith, and that not of yourselves, it 
is the gift of God." Since that day, 
I say, no number of legal trumpets, 
no matter how loud and long they 
blow — to me it comes from no 
where, and means nothing, for "my 



162 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



hope is built on nothing less, than 
Jesus blood and righteousness." 

For, as the text reads, "in a mo- 
ment, in the twinkling of an eye" T 
seemed to be delivered from that 
state of "death, hell and the grave" 
and from that bondage of dead 
works, to serve — as I hope — the 
true and living God. And to my 
mind this gospel trumpet has blown 
from "the days of righteous Abel 
until now, and it will continue to 
blow until every child whose name 
is written in the Lamb's Book of life 
shall hear its joyful tidings. And 
as certain as the gospel tidings is 
for the living, and not for the dead, 
just so certain this trumpet can 
never be extorted to mean that it is 
to raise our mortal bodies from 
graves of earth. 

It did not raise us from death in 
trespasses and sins either, but after 
the Word of God quickens the dead 
in sins, then the gospel trumpet 
means something to the living child, 
according to his or her measure of 
the gift of grace. 

And if living and alive to gospel 
exhortation, reproof, and rebuke, 
he will grow in grace and the 
knowledge of the truth, and the 
Spirit will take the things of Jesus, 
and shew them unto him, he will be 
blest to put off the old man with his 
deeds, and put on the New Man, 
even as the next verse reads "this 
corruptible must put on incorrup- 
tion, and this mortal must put on im- 
mortality." This must be done, for 
the Lord has such control over our 
heart and mind, that we desire to 
have the blessings which he has 
prepared for them who love Hin^ 

All this is, I hope, a matter of 
personal, true religious experience 
with me — that I have passed from 
death unto life, that I have stood 



before the Judgment of Christ, and 
was pardoned, and that I will not 
be put on trial again where my life 
may be in jeopardy, that "the life 
which I now live in the flesh, I live 
by the faith in the Son of God, who 
loved me and gave Himself for me" 
and to me all this tradition of a 
trumpet blowing us from graves of 
earth to appear the second time for 
the same offense is all popish here- 
sy. We are now raised, if our 
hope is a good hope, and sure we 
"shall be changed" if a change for 
the better is not continually going 
on in our Christian life — if this mor- 
tal is not putting on immortality, if 
I am not growing in grace and the 
knowledge of the truth — if I am not 
walking worthy of the vocation 
v/herewith I profess to have been 
called — then it follows that "my 
faith is vain, my religion is vain, 
and I am yet in my sins." 

If "the flesh profiteth nothing" 
then surely it is fitting for us to be 
reconciled to relinquish it when 
called from the shores of time, and 
seeing that "which is born of the 
flesh is flesh" we surely must relin- 
(luish it when called to leave earth 
for Heaven, whether we are recon- 
ciled to it or not, for "flesh and 
nl iod shall not inherit the Kingdom 
<ii Heaven, neither shall corruption 
inherit incorruption." 

We do not put on mortality, and 
then put on immortality over it, as 
we put one coat on over another, 
but we "put off the old man with 
his deeds" especially misdeeds, and 
just so fast as the old man is put 
off, the new man is put on. This 
we hope is our status as a professed 
tollower of Christ, not that we have 
aught to brag of in regard to it, but 
we do hope to "glory in the Lord" 
that He has done great things for 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



163 



us" and we cannot claim to have 
done one single thing to deserve it, 
or reward Him. There was a time 
when the legal trumpets often 
scared me half to death or more, 
that I feared the sting of death, but 
thank God that fear is taken away 
and I can join in that 55th verse of 
this chapter — 1 Cor, 15:55, "O 
death, where is thy sting? O grave, 
where is thy victory?" And to all 
who have been quickened from the 
dead in sin, if such will consider 
their first estate they will see that 
it is not the grave in the cemetery, 
but grave of the unregenerated 
child of God — those who still sleep 
in error, delusion, and every false 
way, "From which none ever wake 
to weep" for when such characters 
awake to the truth as it is in Jesus, 
it is with joy unspeakable and full 
of glory, they awake, not by the 
will of man, or the will of the flesh, 
but by the will of God," these char- 
acters awake because God has writ- 
ten their names in the Book of life, 
and because God calls — "awake 
thou that sleepest, and Christ shall 
give thee light." May we not be 
left to make natural deductions but 
to "compare spiritual things with 
spiritual." 

In gospel bonds, 

E. R. Kinney, 
Box 338, Ahoskan, New York. 



SERVANTS. 

It would be good for all of the 
children of God to study this sub- 

I ject; but I fear they will not. If 
they would serve God acceptably, 

! with reverence and godly fear they 
will have to follow the teaching of 
the scripture on this very important 
point. 

I heard of a teacher in a theologi- 
cal college who asked three young 



students to quote from the Bible 
the passage of scripture which to 
them conveyed the sweetest thought 
or idea of heaven. The first one to 
speak said — "There shall be no sor- 
row there." The second said — 
"There shall be no death," and the 
third quoted — "And all of His ser- 
vants shall serve Him." And those 
chosen to Judge in this contest gave 
their decision in favor of the last 
one. The fact that we shall render 
service to one, is, indeed a sweet 
thought of the world to come. 

The Lord Jesus quoted to satan, 
"For it is written, thou shall wor- 
ship the Lord thy God, and Him 
only shalt thou serve." As this 
quotation the devil leaveth him, 
and behold angels came and min- 
istered unto him. 

"We can not serve two masters," 
and this is most positively stated, 
and observation and experience 
show the same. 

"Hold fast the liberty wherewith 
Christ has made us free, and be not 
again entangled with the yoke of 
bondage, for the yoke here mention- 
ed implies service. "Take my yoke 
upon you, and learn of me." The 
servant of the Lord must not strive, 
and this servant here mentioned re- 
fers to a true minister of Christ, and 
it is a great blessing from God, for 
to be such a servant we have a good 
master, and he is truly good. 

One is our Master even God, and 
all ye are brethren, and Jesus 
taught that real and true greatness 
consists in serving all. He set a 
very worthy example for all of us 
to follow and said to his disciples, 
"behold I am among you as he that 
serveth." "The servant is not 
greater than his lord, neither is he 
that is sent greater than he that 
sent him." 



164 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Look not upon your own things, 
but look upon the things of another, 
and like his master, the true ser- 
vant thinks not of being ministered 
unto, but likes above all things to 
be of assistance to others. He is 
unselfish, and thinks not of how it 
will go with him ; but always es- 
teems others better or more worthy 
than he. "Given to hospitality." He 
is not here to be ministered unto, 
but to minister, and to give his life 
a ransom for many. 

An Elder was chosen to be pastor 
of a church, and he lived some dis- 
tance from them; and on one visit 
to this church he said in conference, 
"You will pay my railroad fare to 
do this service; and the first time 
you fail to send me a check for this 
in advance of my coming you will 
fail to see me." 

It was but justice that the church 
should pay his expenses; and they 
were scripturally bound to do so, 
but this position of his apears to me 
altogether out of place, and looks 
like he thought more of himself 
than he did of them. We have 
quoted above that the public ser- 
vant of God should not strive, etc. 
And this shows that it is God he 
serves, and it is God, for he would 
not serve idols. But it is written, 
and for our learning, "that his ser- 
vants we are to whom we yield our- 
selves servants to obey." 

In Deut. 15th chapter; and in 
Leviticus 25th chapter, we find a 
difference in the way we become 
servants, and should any reader of 
this be enough interested to study 
the difference it will be time well 
spent, but let it suffice for the pres- 
ent to quote the 55th verse of the 
25th chapter of Leviticus. "For un- 
to me the children of Israel are ser- 
vants; they are my servants whom 



I brought from out of the land of 
Egypt, I am the Lord your God." I 
find the subject broad, and there is 
no end to the research, but there 
must be an end to this imperfect ar- 
ticle; so here we stop. 

J. T. SATTERWHITE. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

My precious brethren and sisters 
in Christ I hope: 

It is again that I make the at- 
tempt to try to write to you through 
the columns of Zion's Landmark, 
and I humbly hope the Lord will di- 
rect my poor finite mind to write 
that which is the truth. 

I feel that I fully realize my 
weakness as well as my unworthi- 
ness to write to them who know the 
joyful sound — the monuments of 
His mercy — the jewels of eternal 
life through the death and suffer- 
ings of our Lord Jesus Christ. 

I feel so lonely and cast down, but 
dear readers, as I make this at- 
tempt, I feel to hope that I am not 
destroyed. Oh, that we just could 
now for one moment stop and think 
deep down in our hearts why we are 
not destroyed! Had it not been f^ 
that precious love the dear Lord has 
for His children where would we 
have been? As I think of myself, 
no doubt but I would be wearing 
stripes upon the county roads or 
maybe one doomed to die in the 
electric chair, but thanks to God. 
and not to self, that He has pre- 
served me from such a place. Now 
can't we say with David: "Surely 
Thy goodness and mercy has follow 
ed me all the days of my life." Oh. 
how He has ever been with his peo- 
ple. He never sleeps nor slumbers, 
but His eye is ever watching over 
them and protects them from dan- 
gei's seen and unseen. Now can we 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



165 



write or talk about a greater love 
than that the Lord has for us? Most 
assuredly we cannot! "Behold what 
manner of love is this that the 
Father hath bestowed upon us." 
Indeed, this love is unspeakable, 
and "Behold the half has never 
been told." How and when can 
we appreciate this wonderful love? 
To me, it is only when we are over- 
shadowed by the Holy Spirit. Then 
when we are so favored what a 
blessing and a joy that is inexpress- 
ible and full of glory! Yet how help- 
less we are! It does not please God 
for the Spirit to dwell with us all 
the time, and when we are not the 
time does come when we go with 
bowed heads and mourning. But 
aren't you glad that it is written, 
"Blessed are they that do mourn for 
they shall be comforted." All God's 
children are mourners. This is not 
pleasing to the flesh, but if we be 
the children of the most high God, 
we must be crucified. Then it is 
necessary that we mourn that the 
flesh be brought under subjection, 
and the flesh must be brought un- 
der subjection, but we can be fit 
subjects to praise God and have no 
confidence in the flesh. 

The Lord's people have never, 
and never will go through greater 
trials than the blessed Saviour did, 
and all His trials were for the bene- 
fit of them to whom He loved with 
an everlasting love. We are not 
willing, only as we are made so, to 
suffer just a little pain, but lo, how 
He hath suffering for us! "Surely 
He hath borne our sorrows and car- 
ried our griefs." Isa. 53 :4. Do 
you remember that He said on that 
terrible night of His crucifixion, 
"My God, my God, why hast thou 
forsaken Me"? How often that is 
our cry 1 Yet the Father strengthen- 



ed Him, and surely He hath 
strengthened us. Did He not tell 
Paul, "My grace is sufficient for 
thee?" Certainly He did. And He 
will bring perfect strength out of 
weakness. What poor weak beings 
we are to be made to praise Him, 
yet we do, because "out of the 
mouths of babes and sucklings He 
shall have perfected praise." Oh, 
that we could ONLY be so blest to 
trust in Him in whom all fullness 
dwells, and not in the strength of 
man. "Cursed is the man that 
trusteth in man or maketh flesh his 
arm." The strength of God shall 
stand throughout all eternity, but 
the strength of men and devils shall 
perish for they are vanity and vex- 
ation of spirit. 

Let us examine ourselves and see 
if we be in the faith. Let's not "re- 
move the ancient landmarks which 
our fathers have set." 

Submitted in love, 

FREDERICK W. RHODES, 
102 Youngs Ave., Durham, N. C. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

Elder M. L. Gilbert, 
Dear Brother: 

While I have never met you nor 
heard you preach, yet I feel you are 
no stranger in the household of 
faith, for I have been reading from 
your pen through Landmark for 
many years. My father and mo- 
ther were Primitive Baptists and 
many of my ancestors were of that 
faith, had an uncle that was a 
preacher, and now have a son that 
is R. Lester Dodson, pastor of N. Y. 
Church and on the Editorial Staff 
of the Signs of The Times. I served 
in an humble way as clerk of Staun- 
ton River Association for about 15 
years so you see I have been with 
the Primitive Baptists all my life. 



166 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



I have been a member 40 odd years, 
was well acquainted with Elders 
P. D. Gold and P. G. Lester, your 
old fellow laborers. Have had 
them in my home many times and 
therefore feel I know what they be- 
lieved and taught. Therefore I 
claim they and a great many I 
could name as God's heroes, for 
they stood firm for the old Apostolic 
doctrine that was set up by Jesus 
and His chosen followers. 

Now, my dear brother, this is 
what I want, to urge you to continue 
in the future as you have so ably 
defended it up to the present time, 
while some have gone out from us. 
It may be we do not need them and 
that they were not of us. 

I noticed what you said to Elder 
Hanks lately in Landmark, but it 
was the truth, for he is only in the 
road when he crosses it, on first one 
side then the other. Who can 
place him? Others that we once 
loved have done the same thing un- 
til we feel some times there will be 
none left to hold up the true flag, 
but my brother, will that ever be 
true? No, for I feel Jesus is your 
Captain and you and many others I 
have in mind are his soldiers, and 
he bids you not give over. So, fight 
on, my brother, and while I will not 
be able to bear flowers at your fun- 
eral or erect a monument at your 
tomb, you are certain of something- 
better, a crown of righteousness fit- 
ted on by God's own hand at the 
time of His coming, and to think 
peace and happiness and all things 
needed to make your happiness 
complete and you will even be like 
Jesus. Then we can say with 
Jacob, it is enough oh my brother. 
I wonder if my name is written 
there. 

If after you have read this you 



have any fellowship for poor me, 
pray that it may be so. Now I say to 
you watch as some are commanded 
to do. You now have a good force 
on the staff of the Landmark, i 
love all of them dearly. Elder 
Rowe's present wife is my niece and 
a good help meet for him. 

Farewell for this time. 

In hope of eternal life, 

Your brother, 
R. L. DODSON, 

Danville, Va. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 
Dear Sir: 

Inclosed you will find a letter, 
written by our dear Sister Keaton, 
to be read in Conference held with 
the Church of Bethlehem, Tyrrell 
County, during our last quarterly 
meeting at that place. Sister Keaton 
is a much loved member of that 
body — each member expressing re- 
gret at her absence — but after 
hearing the letter read, we all felt 
that it contained a message from 
one of God's litle ones and desired 
to see it in print, hoping that its 
contents may bring joy to others. 

We have Sister Keaton's' permis- 
sion to publish same in the Land- 
mark. 

W. R. HINES, 

Wilson, N. C. 



The Letter. 

To the Church at Bethlehem and 
Friends of my childhood, youth and 
middle age, the church of my angel 
father and mother, where I have 
been enabled by divine grace (as I 
hope) to worship with them and 
other dear fathers and mothers in 
Israel, who have long since passed 
over the river and are basking in 
the sunshine of redeeming love. O, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



167 



eler, who seeks refuge there, but O, 
says the weary one, I think I see the 
shadow of that wonderful rock, but 
behold I am vile, am not fit to be 
numbered with the king's guests, 
and besides like one of old, lame 
on both feet, weak and helpless, 
must lie here by the road-side or the 
gospel pool and wait for the moving 
of the water, just wait and watch 
and pray, ere long our good Samari- 
tan shows himself through the lat- 
tice, or we see him through a glass 
darkly. How great is that dark- 
ness, sometimes like the darkness 
of Egypt, can be felt, but blessed 
thought while we cannot go to Him, 
because of the thick darkness of 
this poor earth of ours, yet He mer- 
cifully and lovingly comes right in 
this tabernacle of clay, the darkness 
flees from his presence, the son of 
righteousness arises with healing 
in his wings and ere we are aware 
the heart breaks forth with songs of 
praise and rejoicing in the light of 
sometimes the shadows are so deep 
and so rough seems the path to the 
goal, that I feel like it would be 
sweet to just turn loose of all things 
earthly and join them over there, 
but I want to be submissive to my 
neavenly Father's will and run with 
patience the race set before me, 
ever looking unto Jesus who is the 
Author and Finisher of the Chris- 
tian faith. But the question arises 
deep down in this poor heart of 
mine, how can I look to that dear 
friend when my vision is so dim? 
How can I run, when the road be- 
fore me seems so long and dusty 
and so weary my feet, O ! but some- 
thing seems to whisper to the weary 
traveler, "Just ahead is a great 
Rock and in that Rock are great 
clefts, large enough and strong 
enough to shelter every weary trav- 



the knowledge of the glory of God 
in the face of Jesus Christ." 

Yesterday P. M., I asked Bro. 
and Sister Hines to explain why I 
could not be with you and thought 
I would not try to write this time, as 
my poor letters always seem to me a 
failure, but somehow my heart and 
mind has been so full of thought of 
you all, I just couldn't help but 
seize my pen and try to tell you 
some of my exercise of mind, how I 
hope and pray that our dear pastor 
may be overshadowed by divine 
wisdom, thereby enabling him to 
partake of the fruit from the tree of 
life and feed some of God's humble 
poor. I know that he must speak 
to you as individuals, calling you by 
name, as he did Mary of old, to pre- 
pare your heart to receive the word 
as spoken through his undershep- 
herd. May you be blest to enjoy a 
heavenly feast together, thereby 
being strengthened and built up in 
the inner man and to feel when this 
meeting is over, thai it is good for 
us to be here. Realizing this, I 
know you will consider the great 
sacrifice our pastor and his dear 
companion are making for our spir- 
itual good. 

Husband joins me in warmest 
Christian love to all, asking an in- 
terest in your prayers and that you 
come to see us, I am, I hope. 
Your little sister, 

MRS. W. H. KEATON, 
Wilson, N. C. 



A MISNOMER. 

We have been thinking for some 
time that there should be some way 
for our brethren to get together 
and come to a better understanding 
about things. We are brethren and 
some very near each other in this 
relation we bear in our experience 



168 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



of grace, but get far apart, at times 
in doctrinating each other (or at- 
tempting to) . 

I find that those among us who 
are humble and prayerful have not 
the spirit of vain wrangling, and we 
love to sit down in their quiet homes 
and rest. 

The term, "Absolute predestina- 
tion of all things," has taken form 
in such a way as to make it very ob- 
jectional among us. Our people 
are becoming very sensitive over it 
and the proper thing and sensible 
thing to do is to drop it from our lit- 
erature. It has become a mis- 
nomer and is calculated to do us 
great harm through this medium. 

We believe that Elder Gilbert 
Bebee meant no more nor less by the 
term than to express the sovereign- 
ty of God, which all sound Baptists 
believe, whether their language, al- 
ways conveys it or not. Brethren 
of grace cannot afford to divide 
and sub-divide over words to no 
profit. We have some among us 
whose hearts are not truly in the 
cause and hence do not find the 
sickening pangs that must come to 
the meek and lowly, in heart among 
us, if they should be torn asunder. 

Come, let us reason together! We 
have heard brethren and sisters do 
this, and express their deep regret 
for misunderstanding. 

When we say the devil is at the 
bottom of all the meanness that 
ever has been or ever will be, but is 
a bound devil and can only go so 
far and no further, we say it all. 
This says God has His unlimited 
sway over him, and it is in harmony 
with the belief of all true Primitive 
Baptists. 

Since animosity has run so high 
and much bitterness grown out of 
it, we prayerfully ask the privilege 



to close this discussion, and inquire 
at the hands of God before we take 
up our pens, for war any more. In 
our going forth we often say, I had 
rather carry water than to carry the 
fuel. 

Now there is positively no differ- 
ence to fight out amongst us, and 
if those who are capable would 
spend some of their time, in each 
community reasoning together 
would accomplish much good. 
When brethren and sisters get 
thrown apart over little differences 
it is so natural, it seems, for them to 
shun each other, and talk about 
each other. Then when brought 
together and we see how near 
nothing there was between us, it is 
easy to see how foolishly we acted. 
We need each other and there is no 
reason except stubornness that 
keeps us from having free inter- 
course with each other. 

Now, again, we say, that it shows 
good sense in us to drop any man 
made phraseology that misnames 
things, and confuses us often to 
painful divisions. 

J. D. Cockram. 
(Editorial in "Spiritual Law 
Counsel," July 1914.) 



NEED ALL THE GIFTS. 

Eld. O. J. Denny, 

Winston-Salem, N. C, 
Dear Brother: 

I have just read your article on 
"Let us reason together." In my 
judgment, it is timely, and one of 
the best articles you have ever writ- 
ten. I wish all of the Elders would 
do this (the way you said) and quit 
looking for faults. We need every 
gift that God has given us. As for 
me, I am willing for each and every 
One to abide in his own lot (field). 
I hope I have forbearance. If I 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



169 



can't see just like some see, I do 
not want to kill him. 

As you have said, we have al- 
ways had two schools; but here of 
late, I see some that almost hate the 
word predestinate. That should 
not be. That is the backbone of 
our faith and experience. Those 
that do not see as deep as some 
others, are making war against it. 
We need admonition and we need 
doctrine. But those that feed on 
doctrine have to be "weaned from 
the breast." We should not try to 
push our views on anyone. 

With love, 

T. A. STANFIELD. 



A WARM FEELING FOR THE 
LANDMARK. 

Eld. O. J. Denny, 
Dear Brother: 

I am enclosing one dollar for 
which give me credit on my sub- 
scription to the Landmark, I have a 
warm feeling in my heart for the 
Landmark. My father. Elder J. C. 
Hall, had it in his home, and I read 
it when I was a boy at home. Eld. 
P. G. Lester was a distant relative 
of my mother, and I knew him 
when he first began preaching. 
Later when I hope I was enlighten- 
ed to see and made to love spiritual 
things in the year of 1882, I became 
a reader of the Landmark for sev- 
eral years. I greatly admired the 
way in which Elder Lester conduct- 
ed the policy of the paper, endeav- 
oring to maintain the gospel of the 
Bible, with a liberal consideration 
of other men's views, keeping the 
columns of the paper free from con- 
tention, thus avoiding strife and 
confusion. I hope and believe that 
you will strive to maintain the high 
standard of the Landmark as a med- 



ium of correspondence for the good 
of Zion and comfort of God's peo- 
ple. 

Yours truly, 
ELD. W. L. HALL, 

808 S. Park, 
Independence, Mo. 



ATTACHED TO LANDMARK. 

P. D. Gold Publishing Co., 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Sir: 

I am enclosing my remittance 
for the Landmark, which will pay 
my subscription to March 1932. 

I have been a subscriber for 41 
years, and have become very much 
attached to it. 

I subscribed to it in 1890, when 
your dear father was the active edi- 
tor. And I feel like his editorials 
are as good as any I have ever read. 
I have 16 volumes bound in book 
form for future reference. I also 
think the present corps of editors 
are able men. 

I appreciate the interest you take 
in the Landmark, and wish it much 
success. 

Very truly, 

J. E. HERNDON, 
Danvile, Va., R. 2. 



ALL THE ENJOYMENT HE HAS. 

Dear Brother: 

You will find enclosed money or- 
der for the Landmark for the year 
1932. I enjoy reading the good 
letters from the dear brothers and 
sisters. I have been taking the 
Landmark many years. It is new 
to me every time it comes. I will 
soon be 65 years old and reading 
the good paper is all the enjoyment 
in life I have. 

V. D. WHITFIELD. 
Swepsonville, N. C. 



170 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Zioa's Lanidrnjark 

"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

hilder M. L. Gilbert — Dade City, 
FU. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. NO. 11 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C, APRIL 15, 1931 



EXCERPTS FROM THE WORKS, 
AND WRITINGS OF MR. JOHN 
GILL OF ENGLAND. 

Dr. Gill as he was known in Eng- 
alnd was perhaps the best posted 
man in the Scriptures of any man of 
his time or of any other age. He was 
the only man so far as known, who 
wrote an exposition of the old and 
new Testament, in which every 
chapter, and verse was given con- 
sideration. 

Born in 1697, joined the Baptist 
Church in 1716, died in 1771, 
preached his first sermon on the 
first Lord's day evening on the next 
Sunday following his baptism on 
November 4th, 1716 from the text 
1st Cor. 22. "For I am determined 
to know nothing among you save 
Jesus Christ and him crucified." 
Forty years later he referred to his 
first sermon, and text, and said, "by 



the grace of God, I've been blest, in 
a good degree, to keep that pledge." 

In his early ministry, his Church, 
entered into a covenant, adopted 
Rules of Decorum, Articles of Faith, 
and from the same we read. Article 
5. "We believe that the Lord Jesus 
Christ, being set up from everlast- 
ing as the mediator of the new Cov- 
enant, and He having engaged to be 
the surety of His people, did, in the 
fulness of time, really assume hu- 
man nature, and not before, neither 
in whole nor in part. His human 
soul, being a creature, existed not 
from eternity; but was created and 
formed, in His body, by Him that 
forms the Spirit of man within him, 
when that was conceived in the 
womb of the Virgin, and so ; His 
human nature consists of a true 
body, and a person made of a wo- 
man, and not before; in which na- 
ture. He really suffered and died, 
as the substitute, in their stead, 
whereby; He made all satisfaction 
of their sins, which the law and Jus- 
tice of God would require, as well 
as made way for all those blessings, 
which are needful for them both in 
lime and eternity." 

Art. 6. "We believe that the 
perfection of God's elect is only by 
the righteousness of Christ imputed 
to them, and the free and full par- 
don of their sins and transgressions, 
past, present and to come, is only 
through the blood of Christ accord- 
ing to the riches of His grace." 

After adopting their twelve Ar- 
ticles of Faith, He wrote, "We es- 
teem it our duty to walk with each 
other in all humility and brotherly 
love, to watch over each others con- 
versation, to stir up each other to 
love and good works, not forsaking 
the assembly of ourselves together, 
as we have opportunity, to worship 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



171 



God according to His revealed will; 
and when need be, or case requires, 
to warn, rebuke and admonish one 
another, according to the rules of 
the Gospel." 

"Moreover, we think ourselves 
obliged to sympathize with each 
other, also to bear one another's 
weakness, failings and infirmities 
and, particularly to pray for one 
another." 

Commenting further on the belief 
^.mong some that salvation makes 
one immune from wrong, since 
some advocated that once saved, no 
need fear the law. He wrote, "Men 
commonly dream of a strange kind 
of Gospel, which never came into 
the mind of God, that; seeing Christ 
hath died, that they may live as 
they list, letting themselves loose 
to all manner of impiety, and yet go 
to heaven." 

"Certainly, had God opened such 
a gap, to let in such an inundation 
of impiety. He could not have justly 
complained of the deluge of it, that 
overflows the world." 

"Far be it from the Holy God, 
whose purity abhors it, to allow 
such licentiousness." "It is true 
that God finds men ungodly, and 
imputes righteousness unto them ; 
but he doth not leave them ungod- 
ly, after he hath justified them; but 
teacheth them to deny ungodliness." 
"He that denieth not ungodliness, 
him will Christ deny before His 
Father which is in Heaven." 

In a sermon on the Revelation of 
Grace, He said. "The revelation 
of grace, is no encouragement to 
sin," and said "referring to some 
who are taxed with saying that 
their sins are laid upon Christ, that 
they are believers, therefore, may 
live in sin." He replies, "If there 
be any such, let me deal plainly 



with them. For my part I must ac- 
count them the greatest monsters 
on the face of the earth, the great- 
est enemies to the church that ever 
lived. And I dare say of such ene- 
mies of the Free Grace of God, the 
greatest hinderers of the course of 
it, and I dare be bold to say, open 
drunkards, harlots and murderers, 
who profess not the Gospel of 
Christ, are infinitely short of these 
in abomination, and if there be any 
such here, their faith is no better 
than that of devils for they believe 
and tremble." 

Time and space forbids continu- 
ance; but will say that Dr. Gill was 
perhaps the greatest preacher of his 
time, and has been regarded as a 
bulwark of strength in the defense 
of the Gospel of the free, full and 
sovereign grace of God. 

Just before his death, he said to 
relatives, "I depend wholly and 
alone upon the free, sovereign, eter- 
nal, unchangeable, unspeakable, 
love of God, the firm and everlast- 
ing Covenant of Grace, and my in- 
terest in the Trinity, for my whole 
salvation, and not upon any right- 
eousness of my own ; nor on any- 
thing in me or done by me, under 
the influence of the Holy Spirit. 
Then as though confirming what he 
had said, "Not upon any service of 
mine which I have been assisted to 
perform for the good of the Church 
do I depend; but upon my interest 
in the Trinity, the free grace of God, 
and the blessings of Grace stream- 
ing to me through the blood and 
righteousness of Christ, as the 
ground of my hope. These are no 
new things to me, but what I have 
been long acquainted with, what I 
can live by and die by. I appre- 
hend I shall not long be here; but 
this you may say, may tell to any 



172 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



of my friends, I have nothing to 
make me uneasy and then repeated 
the verse, 

"He raised me from the depths of 
sin — 

The gates of gaping hell; 

And fixed my standing more secure 

Than 'twas before I fell." 

His last words were: "O my Father, 
my Father." Thus he gently fell 
asleep. 

He was referred to as "A great 
and shining light, whose life as well 
as his ministry and writings were 
above reproach. 

I quote from memory the sub- 
stance of his treatise on the Fore- 
knowledge of God, and said if His 
foreknowledge was the same as His 
predetermination of the redemp- 
tion of His people, then all who 
were fore-known would, of neces- 
sity, be conformed to the image of 
Jesus Christ. Therefore he drew a 
marked distinction between the 
foreknowledge of God and His Pre- 
destination of the salvation of His 
people. 

Again in discussing the saying. 
"Who shall lay anything to the 
charge of God's elect?" He said 
they charge themselves oft, and are 
apt in charging others; but God 
having loved them with an everlast- 
ing love, nothing could separate 
them from His love. 

This great minister and man of 
God died 100 years and 16 days be- 
fore I was born; but though dead, 
yet he speaketh to my comfort. 
Yours in hope, 

O. J. DENNY. 



GREETINGS. 

To the dear ones scattered 
abroad. Greetings in the Lord. Dear 
brethren and sisters read the latter 



part of the 4th chapter of Ephesians 
beginning at the 17th verse. See 
and zealously heed the admonition 
of our apostle Paul to a church of 
Gentile believers, these Gentiles 
who had sat in darkness had been 
given to see a great light. Jesus had 
manifested himself to them, the 
prophet had said of him, he was "a 
light to lighten the Gentiles. Not 
all the Gentiles had seen him, but 
some had. He takes out of them a 
people for his name, and those thus 
enlightened had been gathered by 
Paul's preaching into Church rela- 
tionship, for the Lord had especial- 
ly commissioned him to the 
apostleship of the Gentiles, 
and so he enjoins upon them 
that they walk not as other Gen- 
tiles walk in the vanity of their 
mind. "Having the understanding 
darkened, being alienated from the 
life of God through the ignorance 
that is in them, because of the blind- 
ness of their heart." It is always 
ignorance upon the part of man 
that makes him oppose God and re 
ject the Lord Jesus Christ. Not 
natural or worldly ignorance, for it 
is the wise and prudent of the world 
from whom the Lord has hid the 
things of his kingdom. While he 
has revealed them to babes, it is not 
from any inability of their carnal 
powers to comprehend the things of 
the world, but the blindness of 
their heart. Man looketh upon 
the outward parts and reveals 
things to the head, or natural in- 
tellect, but God looketh upon the 
heart and reveals things to the af- 
fections. Man's ability and works 
are all natural. God is a spirit and 
his work is spiritual. These are 
two kingdoms, diverse the one from 
the other. Jesus said, "My king- 
dom is not of this world, it is with 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



173 



;he heart that man believeth unto 
righteousness. Those blind heart- 
ed Gentiles he tells us in the next 
verse are past feeling and have 
given themselves over to lascivious- 
ness, to work all uncleanness with 
greediness. 20th verse. "But ye 
have not so learned Christ." The 
teaching of Christ, in the hearts of 
those born from above is entirely 
different from that which they had 
in their former ignorance which 
was the gratification of their evil 
lusts. Now being born again not 
of corruptible but of incorruptible 
seed by the word of God, it is not 
proper or God honoring that they 
should walk as other Gentiles walk. 
They have learned of Christ that 
they are not called unto unclean- 
ness but unto holiness. Therefore 
they are to put off concerning the 
former conversation the old man, 
which is corrupt according to the 
deceitful lust. Sometimes we hear 
it said, this is my nature, it was 
born in, me. I can't help it. May 
be we cannot take out of the old 
man that which was born in him, 
neither does Paul tell us to do so, 
but to put him off, don't allow him 
the gratification of his evil passions, 
especially is it unbecoming in us 
who preach this blessed Jesus, and 
his earnest and holy life to others, 
to spend our time in a display of our 
natural wits to amuse others. The 
apostle condemns foolish talking 
and jesting. How can one who has 
been taught of Christ, the blessed 
importance of spiritual things go 
into the pulpit a place set apart by 
the church and by Christ we trust, 
for those to stand who proclaim sal- 
vation with their tongues and word 
of peace reveal, and say things of 
purpose to make the people laugh. 
Is it not holy ground? Then put 



off the old man with his fleshly in- 
clinations, and be renewed in the 
spirit of your mind, and put on the 
new man, which after God is cre- 
ated in righteousness and true holi- 
ness. Put away lying, speak every 
man truth with his neighbor, for we 
are members one of another, and so 
should be helpers one of another, 
with that ability which God giveth, 
which is Christ, and if God give you 
Christ how shall he not with him 
freely give you all things. There- 
fore James says, if any man lack 
wisdom let him ask of God who 
giveth to all men liberally and up- 
braideth not. Are we ignorant? 
Jesus is our wisdom. Are we weak? 
Jesus is our strength. Are we 
poor? He is our all in all. Are we 
in the dark? Jesus is our light. 
Are we dead? Jesus is our life. 
Yea he is head over all things to 
the church. The fullness of him 
that filleth all in all. Then be ye 
angry and sin not, though your 
temper gets up, keep your mouth 
shut. Be still and know that ven- 
geance belongeth unto the Lord. 
And so we might go on through all 
the verses of the remaining portior 
of this chapter, to show that those 
who are born and taught of God 
should live differently from those 
who are not, for those who have 
Jesus, the light of life should walk 
as children of light. Living sinners 
can and do do things that dead sin- 
ners cannot do. Now brethren and 
sisters, Paul, in the closing verse of 
this chapter says to us, "And be ye 
kind one to another, tenderhearted, 
forgiving one another, even as God 
for Christ's sake hath forgiven you. 
If we did not do wrong there would 
be no occasion to forgive one an- 
other and knowing our own weak- 
ness and wrong doing, should we 



174 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



not be tenderhearted and kind to 
each other. Maybe my brother is 
as weak as I am. Maybe his temp- 
tation was as great as mine, even 
greater. Shall we forgive one an- 
other our trespasses. Jesus says 
we should. Is it important to me 
that I should forgive one who sins 
against me? Jesus says if ye for- 
give not men their trespasses, nei- 
ther will your heavenly Father for- 
give you. How then can I have 
peace in my own bosom, when I 
know that I have not forgiven my 
brother? How shall I forgive? As 
God for Christ's sake hath forgiven 
me. How did he forgive me? Did 
he require of me full amends for all 
I have done against him, or did he 
forgive all debt? Then I should 
forgive. The matter of repentance 
is between the offender and his 
God. Brethren confess your 
faults one to another, repent of your 
wrongs (turn away from them) 
love one another for Jesus' sake, 
and the God of peace shall be with 
you, but if you bite and devour one 
another, take heed that ye be not 
consumed one of another. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



LUST THE CAUSE OF SIN. 

Dear Mr. Gold and readers of the 
Landmark : 

I notice in the Feb. 1st issue that 
one W. F. Britt of Arcadia, Fla., 
says, "I liked Joshua T. Rowe's let- 
ter until he gets near the bottom of 
the first page." He says "That 
man being a creature of dust, lust- 
ful and weak." Bro. Britt does not 
say which issue of the paper this 
remark appeared in. So I have 
been unable to find it. Some of my 
copies are loaned out, but presum- 
ing that he quoted me correctly, 
will say that Bro, Britt says his un- 



derstanding is contrary to mine. 
Now my dear Brother your under- 
standing is not only contrary to 
mine, but also contrary to the apos- 
tle James. Bro. Britt says, "Lust 
was the result of sin." Brother 
James says, "Then when lust hath 
conceived, it bringeth forth sin." So 
instead of sin being the cause of 
lust, lust is the cause of sin. Had 
there not been something in Adam 
and Eve that the serpent could 
reach they would not have sinned. 
Eve saw the tree was good for food, 
pleasant to the eyes, and to be de- 
sired to make one wise. So she par- 
took. The devil tried his art to its 
full strength on the Lord Jesus 
Chri.st, and utterly failed. 

I just wanted to call my dear 
brother's attention to these things, 
not for controversy for we do not 
want any controversy in Zion's 
Landmark. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



MRS. CLAUDE JARRELL. 

Dear Brethren and Sisters: 

It is with a sad heart that I try to write 
in memory of our dear little friend, Mrs. 
Claude Jarrell. Before her marriage her 
name was Miss Letha Massey. She has 
gone on to her heavenly home, something 
like a year ago ,the last of January, 1930. 
She was a loving, devoted wife and mother 
to her husband and children. To this 
union were born 8 chilren, two of them 
dying in infancy. She has living 3 boys 
and 3 girls. She loved her family so 
dearly. She was ever teaching and caring 
tor her children. She has left for a 
lirighter and more beautiful home, where 
all is love. Jesus came down to earth and 
took her bright and cheerful soul home to 
rest in heaven, away from the trials and 
( oflicts of earth. 

We are left sad and lonely and her lov- 
ing children are so sweet. They say they 
miss their mother so much. Their father 
keeps them all together, and he cares for 
them as best he can. He is a farmer and 
has so much work, and they love him and 
tliey all seem to cling to home together. 
They have an aged grandfather who loves 
them, Mr. John Massey at Salem, Virginia. 
Our dear little friend and sister has living 
a step-mother, one brother, Ambrose Mas- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



175 



sey, and one sister living at Charleston, 
\^ esi Virginia. Her brother lives in Illi- 
i.ois. And two half brothers, Earls and 
liershman Massey of Salem. 

We feel assured that our dear friend 
Hiul sister had a good hope in Christ, our 
l.difl. She would go as often as she could 
I,. X'alley View church, two miles from her 
hdiiH' and repeat the words over, that she 
couhi listen all day to our dear old ser- 
vant, Elder Reynolds, and Elder Cum- 
mings preach. Her face, her words, and 
walk was a sure testimony of her being a 
bright Christian. 

We are trusting that in our Saviour's 
own time, he will bring the husband into 
his fold, and that he will meet his dear 
companion on the shining shore, in the 
rea ms of eternal bliss in heaven. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Williamson had 
reared this loving wife and mother, most 
half of her single life, and there are not 
words to express their love and devotion 
for her in their home, and the many 
friends and kindred all about are made so 
sad in Montgomery County. She left an 
aged aunt, Mrs. Jim Rook of Pilot, Va. 

MRS. W. M. LESTER. 



SISTER BETTIE HARRISON 

Whereas, on Dec. 16, 1930, it pleased 
our heavenly father to remove by death 
our lovable Sister Harrison from our lit- 
tle band to a better world on high. We 
feel that she is now in the presence of her 
Lord, whom her soul delighted in, and by 
her walk showed a meek and humble 
spirit. 

Sister Harrison first united with the 
church at Spring Green about 27 years 
ago, and was baptized by Elder George 
Roberson, later on in years making her 
home in Tarboro. She moved her mem- 
bership by letter to Tarboro Church Sat- 
urday before 1st Sunday in June 1914, 
where she lived a loving and devoted mem- 
ber until death. Her age was 61 years, 
9 months and 23 days. 

Sister Harrison was twice married, the 
first time to Peter Martin. To this union 
were born five children, Jessie Martin, a 
policeman of Tarboro, Lida Andrews, Ida 
Smith, Cora Davenport, and Sallie Brad- 
shaw. 

Her second marriage was to Mr. J. T. 
Harrison, who passed away a few months 
before her passing. Two children were 
born unto them, Effie Rawls and Johnnie 
Harrison. 

The funeral was conducted by Elder A. 
B. Denson of Rocky Mount, at the home 
of her daughter, Mrs. Sallie Bradshaw of 
Tarboro. 

Therefore be it resolved. First: her 
church has lost a faithful and loveable 
member, and we desire to bow in humble 
submission to our blessed Lord who is too 
good to be unkind. 



The church at Tarboro extends to the 
bereaved children its heartfelt sympathy 
in the loss of their dear mother. 

Resolved, Third, 

That a copy of these resolutions be sent 
lo the bereaved family, a copy be placed 
on our church record and one sent to 
Zion's Landmark. 

Done by order of the church in Confer- 
ence Saturday before first Sunday in Feb. 
1931. 

J. S. CORBETT, Mod. 
CLAY BROWN, Clerk. 
LULA OVERTON HYMAN, 
Committee. 



CEDAR ISLAND YEARLY MEETING. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C, 
Dear Sir: 

I hope the dear Lord will give you many 
years to publish the good old Landmark 
and the blessed truths it has always con- 
tended for. 

Please state in the Landmark, the Lord 
willing, that the next Cedar Island yearly 
meeting will begin on Friday before the 
first Sunday in May and continue three 
days, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. All 
peace loving Baptists are invited to meet 
with us, especially ministers. 

Also state that the Hunting-quarter 
yearly meeting will convene with that 
church on Friday before the second Sun- 
day in June and continue three days. All 
true Baptists are invited who have a mind 
to be with us. 

The Hunting-quarter Church is situated 
on Atlantic, the home place and home 
church of the late beloved Elder L. H. 
Hardy. This church was the beloved 
church of Elder Hardy and was faithfully 
served by him for many years. The writer 
and dear Elder Hardy were associated to- 
gether for several years as brethren in the 
ministry and as I hope in the Lord. Our 
homes were only twelve miles apart. We 
never had any cause for trouble and wer« 
perfectly agreed on the doctrine of pre- 
destination and election, and salvation by 
grace. We still deeply mourn the loss of 
such a good, kind, loving and faithful 
preacher and pastor as was Elder Hardy. 
Such precious, noble gifts from God are 
seldom to be found. 

We take this medium of asking an in- 
terest in your prayers and the prayers of 
all the dear old Baptists everywhere. The 
unworthy writer is now trying to serve 
four churches. Cedar Island, Hunting- 
quarter, South River and Rohama in 
Morehead City. All the churches are in 
peace and sweet fellowship among them- 
selves, contending for the faith once de- 
livered to the saints. May God be praised. 

Yours in good hope, 
ELDER. W. W. STYRON. 



176 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



AMANDA STANFIELD. 

Sister Amanda Stanfield, wife of Bro- 
ther Eugene A. Stanfield and daughter of 
Jimmie Lewis and Mary F. Lewis, was 
born October 7, 1870. Her father and 
mother both were members of the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church at Meadow meeting 
house, Greene Count, N. C. 

She had five brothers and two sisters, 
namely, Benjamin, J. Thomas, William, 
Samuel, Redding. The last named two 
are living. Benjamin and J. Thomas were 
members of the Meadow Church. Her sis- 
ters, Mrs. H. L. Brake of Rocky Mount, 
N. C, and Mrs. Mary Lang of Farmville, 
N. C, also survive and are members of the 
Primitive Baptist church and are known 
and esteemed by many friends in this and 
other states. 

She was married to Eugene A. Stanfield 
in the yeor of 1906 and to this union were 
born two sons and one daughter, namely 
Thomas Eugene, Mary Finette and Robert 
B., Thomas Eugene preceded her to the 
grave. 

She joined the church at the Meadow in 
the year 1903 and was baptized by Elder 
D. A. Mewborn. Later she moved her 
membership to Damascus church in the 
town of Farmville, N. C, where she con- 
tinued a faithful member until death. 

She was loved and esteemed by all who 
knew her. She delighted in the church 
and attended her meetings as well as the 
meetings of the corresponding churches as 
long as she lived. She was at the Meadow 
Church just a few days before she died. 
She died March 3, 1930. Her daughter, 
too, has since passed on into the beyond 
but we believe, knowing of their faith and 
works and the beautiful spirit manifested 
in their life and especially in the writings 
of her daughter, one of which was re- 
cently published in the Landmark, that 
their spirit is today in the kingdom of our 
Lord, for He hath said, "To him that over- 
cometh will I grant to sit with me in my 
throne, even as I also overcame, and am 
set down with my Father in his throne." 
Rev. 3rd Chapter, 1st verse. 

The only way to overcome our enemies, 
even death is when He blesses us to do 
so by the Blood of the Lamb, and His 
Spirit. 

J. E. MEWBORN. 



STATEMENT OP THE OWNERSHTP, 
MANAGEMENT, CIRCULATION, 
ETC., REQUIRED BY THE 
ACT OF CONGRESS OF 
AUGUST 24, 1912. 
Of the Zion's Landmark, published twice 
a month at Wilson, N. C. April 15, 1930. 
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 
COUNTY OF WILSON, 
ss. 

Before me, a Notary Public for the State 
and County aforesaid, personally appear- 



ed John D. Gold, who, having been duly 
sworn according to law, deposes and says 
tliat he is the business manager of the 
Zion's Landmark, and that the following 
is, to the best of his knowledge and belief, 
a true statement of the ownership, manage- 
ment (and if a daily paper, the circula- 
tion), etc., of the aforesaid publication for 
the date shown in the above caption, re- 
quired by the Act of August 24, 1912 em- 
bodied in section 44 3, Postal Laws and 
Regulations, printed on the reverse side 
of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of 
the publisher, editor, managing editor, 
and business managers are: 

Publisher P. D. Gold Publishing Co., 
Wilson, N. C. 

Editors, Elders O. J. Denny, Winston- 
Salem, N. C, M. L. Gilbert, Dade City, 
Fla., S. B. Denny, Wilson, J. T. Howe, Bal- 
timore. 

Business Manager, John D. Gold, Wil- 
son, N. C. 

2. That the owners are: P. D. Gold 
Publishing Co., John D. Gold. 

:i. That the known bondholders, mort- 
uapps, and other security holders owning 
or holding 1 per cent or more of total 
amount of bonds mortgages, or other se- 
curities are: First National Bank, L. S. 
Hartley, Mergenthaler Linotype Co., Brook- 
lyn, New York. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above 
fiiviug the names of the owners, stock- 
holders, and security holedrs, if any, con- 
tain not only the listof stockholders and 
security holders as they appear upon the 
books of the company but also, in cases 
where the stockholders or security holder 
appears upon the books of the company as 
trustee or in any other fiduciary relation, 
the name of the person or corporation for 
wiiom such trustee is acting, is given; also 
that the said two paragraphs contain state- 
ments embracing affiant's full knowledge 
and belief as to the circumstances and 
conditions under which stockholders and 
security holders who do not appear upon 
the books of the company as trustees, hold 
stock and securities in a capacity other 
than that of a bona fide owner; and this 
affiant has no reason to believe that any 
ithor person, association, or corporation 
has any interest direct or other securities 
than as so stated by him. 

JOHN D. GOLD. 

Sworn to and subscribed to before me this 
nth day of April, 1931. 

ELIZABETH S. CLARKE. 

Notary Public. 
My Comm. expires April 18, 1931. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

^^^^^^^^^^ AT 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIV. MAY 1, 1931 No. 12 



GOD HEALS NAAMAN THE SYRIAN. 

"Now Naaman, captain of the host of the King of Syria, was a great 
man with his master, and honorable, because by him the Lord had given 
deliverance unto Syria: he was also a mighty man in valor, but he was 
a leper. 

And the Syrians had gone out by companies, and had brought away 
captive out of the land of Israel a little maid; and she waited on 
Naaman's wife. 

And she said unto her mistress. Would God my Lord were here with 
the prophets that is in Samaria! For he would recover him of his leprosy. 

And one went in, and told his lord, saying. Thus and thus saith the 
maid, that is of the land of Israel. And the king of Syria said, Go to, go 
and I will send a letter to the king of Israel. And he departed, and took 
with him ten talents of silver, and 6000 pieces of gold, and ten changes of 
raiment. 

And he brought the letter to the king of Israel, saying. Now when this 
letter is come unto thee, behold, I have therewith sent Naaman, my ser- 
vant to thee, that thou mayest recover him of his leprosy. 

And it came to pass when the king of Israel had read the letter that 
he rent his clothes and said. Am I God, to kill and to make alive, that 
this man doth send unto me to recover a man of his leprosy? Wherefore 
consider, I pray you, and see how he seeketh a quarrel against me." 

— 2 Kings 5:1-7. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from tho world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. 0. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Devoted to the Cause of 3^e8U8 Cbrist 



GOD IS LOVE. 

Love is the golden key of life 
It unlocks our hearts to others 
It opens the door of the golden rule 
It opens the gates of heaven. 

Love is God's own command 
For us to love one another 
It's love that makes this world to 
stand, 

It's love that draws us to Him. 

It was a love no tongue can tell, 
That sent our Lord and Saviour 
In this world to die for men 
To save us from destruction. 

Love is a thing that is set apart, 
To save and to protect us, 
It is a thing within our heart 
That makes us akin to Jesus. 

Love is you, not your outward form 
If Jesus reign within you 
Love is the golden rule of life 
And it's the golden key to heaven, 

Mrs. Nettie Ellis, 
132 Pollock St., 
New Bern, N. C. 



PRAISES TO GOD. 

Elder D. M. Vail and family: 

Beloved of God : Once again I at- 
tempt to pen you a few brief lines. 
Family and I are in our usual 
health. Some colds, but up and 
doing our usual routine of work. 
Hope this finds you and your folks 



all well. We have had quite a 
stormy month for March. There 
was a lot of damage to wires during 
a heavy snowfall two weeks ago. 
However we are seeing signs of 
spring again. The birds are sing- 
ing, grass is springing up in green 
shoots and folks are spading the 
gardens. I always get lots of cheer 
from the springtime season. All na- 
ture seems to be awakening from a 
long rest in sleep. If I have any 
experience in grace, it has seemed 
to be in seasons. Sometimes it 
seems that my mind is active and 
can readily receive the things of 
spiritual import. During such 
periods my desires and pleasures 
seem to run after the things that 
savor of Christ's kingdom. Often I 
go my way with a heart of rejoic- 
ing, feeling that the Lord is gra- 
cious and has pardoned all my sins, 
making me an heir of God, and a 
joint-heir with our Lord, Jesus 
Christ. 

Like the birds in the springtime, 
I sing praises unto God for the 
many warm and sunny hours of 
sweet meditation in bright rays of 
light, shining forth from the Son of 
Righteousness, Jesus Christ. As 
the springtime must fade away and 
give place to the other seasons as 
God, in the creation of all things, 
ordained should be, just so seems 
these pleasant and happy seasons 
of my thoughts fade and pass. How 
wonderful did God so arrange all 



178 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



things that there has never been the 
slightest change or variation in all 
His v^^ork. 

All things work together for 
good to them that love God, to 
them who are the called according 
to his purpose. It takes the hot 
summer days to bring to maturity 
the things springtime brings forth. 
It requires the fall season to ripen 
and harden the fruits and vege- 
tables that grow in the summer 
months. Then follow the cold and 
chilly winter season that all na- 
ture may have a rest and the young 
and tender branches harden and 
become stronger to support the 
added growth to come upon it in 
the following season. It seems that 
all this has been quite a comfort to 
me in that my seasons of peace and 
contentment have been of such 
short duration, just fleetingly drift- 
ing or passing from one into an- 
other. Sometimes in the bright and 
beautiful springtime, when all has 
taken on a newness of life and that 
life is being manifested in the shoot- 
ing forth of the bud, the green leaf, 
and finally the bursting forth of 
the beauty and fragrance of the 
flower, we are brought to see more 
clearly the power and wisdom of 
an allwise God. What a beautiful 
scene we will soon behold when na- 
ture again is brought forth out of 
its cold and dreary state unto one 
of beauty and cheer, by the spring- 
time sun which shines upon it. Is 
it not a comfort my dear Brother 
and Sister, to know that just as old 
Mother Earth feels and responds to 
the powers of this springtime sun, 
and bursts forth in life and beauty 
(even though she has appeared 
dead for months past) so in like 



manner does this earthly, carnal 
nature of ours feel and respond to 
the Son of Righteousness when He 
shines in our hearts. Then it is 
that we spring forth in song and 
shout his praise, making manifest 
the wonderful working power with- 
in. A new walk is seen, a new 
song is being sung and the hearts 
are overflowing with love bursting 
forth as in the beauty and fra- 
grance of the lily. O! could but 
these seasons continue. We often 
feel that it would give us perfect 
peace and contentment, yet we 
readily see and understand why all 
these various times and seasons are 
necessary for the good of all na- 
ture. In like manner must we have 
our seasons of trials, doubts, heart- 
aches, disappointments, crosses, yea 
even the cold and lifeless season 
of winter that our faith and hope 
may be strengthened and built up 
for the added things which shall be 
oui's to pass through as we journey 
through the months and years of 
our allotted time here upon these 
shores of an earthly existence. We 
can rest assured that as God liveth, 
so will Winter give way to Spring 
and so on, each following the 
other in succession as it has been 
from the beginning and will con- 
tinue until time shall be no more. 
Springtime and harvest shall never 
fail. No, my dear loved ones, you 
have passed through many chang- 
ing seasons, both in the natural and 
spiritual sense, but you are enabled 
to testify with no uncertainty how 
safe and secure you have been 
kept through them all. Your tem- 
poral wants as well as your spirit- 
ual wants have been supplied. 
Your dark and dreary days have 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



179 



given way to sunshine. The Lord 
has been your Shepherd and though 
you walk through the valley of the 
Shadow of death, you fear no evil, 
His rod and his staff has been your 
comfort. In the midst of your en- 
emies (sinful nature) he has spread 
before you a table and anointed 
your heads with oil and caused your 
cup (heart) to overflow. Now in 
the closing years of your life, as all 
these changing seasons have work- 
ed for you a more secure founda- 
tion upon which your hope is laid, 
even Jesus Christ who is the chief 
corner stone of a building not made 
with hands, but whose builder and 
maker is God, eternal in the heav- 
ens, you are given to see the happy 
fruition of your labors. 

Now you can say, "surely good- 
ness and mercy shall follow me all 
the days of my life and I will dwell 
in the house of the Lord forever." 
What comfort, what joy? Let us 
lay aside, therefore, every weight 
and the sin which doth so easily be- 
set us and run with patience the 
race that is set before us : looking 
unto Jesus, the author and finisher 
of our faith. Yes, my beloved, "he 
is the first and the last," "the be- 
ginning and the end," "Alpha and 
Omega." "By him were the worlds 
made and without him was not any- 
thing made that was made." This 
little message of Christian love is 
sent with the hope and prayer that 
it may be seasoned with the spring- 
time of spiritual cheer and comfort 
to your hearts laden with many 
years of trying and passing scenes 
which but few of us ever live to at- 
tain. 

The Lord has been pleased to 
spare you these many years for a 



purpose and your walk and voca- 
tion has shown this purpose to be 
that of a faithful and tried servant 
in His vineyard. May I approach 
my closing days with such sweet 
and sure promises that will be 
mine, as I feel you have. Love, joy 
and peace from God the Father and 
Jesus Christ the Son, rest upon you 
and all your family, together with 
the household of faith in all parts 
of our land is the prayer of your 
little brother in hope of life ever- 
lasting, Amen. 

Wife sends love and Christian 
greetings. 

C. E. Benson, 
103 Western Avenue, 
Elsmere, Delaware. 



A LITTLE LEAVEN LEAVENETH 
THE WHOLE LUMP. 

This is the language of Paul to 
the Galatian brethren, 5th chapter 
and 9th verse. "Leaven," to pro- 
duce fermentation, mixing with a 
body to render it light, and cause 
changes things or opinions. So 
when the grace of God is put into 
the sinful heart of flesh, man, wo- 
man or child, the lump immediately 
begins to disintegrate and crumble 
and soon we see set up in that heart 
remorse for sin and sorrow for 
wrong doing to such extent that 
grief and mourning follows, and we 
find growing therein as the light is 
manifest, a desire to cease from sin, 
but mind you, this comes on by cer- 
tain degrees as the lump is leaven- 
ed. This leaven spoken of here a^^ 
the grace of God, does a perfect 
work and under the influence of 
the good spirit produces humble- 
ness and love for truth and right- 
eousness and a desire to refrain 



180 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



form evil. All thus exercised are 
told in one word, even in this; thou 
shalt love thy neighbor as thyself. 
This say then, walk in the Spirit 
and ye shall not fulfil the lust of 
the flesh, but by your humbleness, 
kindness and circumspect walk and 
conversation prove to those around 
you, that this leaven of grace has 
indeed wrought a good work in 
your life. As Paul said, if we li^ 
in the spirit let us also walk in the 
Spirit and not desire vain glory. 
This leaven teaches us to not be de- 
ceitful, but forbearing and kind, 
showing forth our appreciation of 
what the holy spirit has wrought in 
us by this divine grace, remember- 
ing that such was to us a most gra- 
cious and unmerited gift. To all 
who follow this blessed rule, there 
is a promise of peace and happi- 
ness, that we should be holy and 
without blame before him in love. 
If indeed we be the blessed recip- 
ients of this leaven (grace) the 
eyes of our understanding being en- 
lightened; that we may know what 
is the hope of his calling, and what 
the riches of the glory of his in- 
heritance in the saints and the ex 
ceeding greatness of his power to 
us-ward who believe according to 
the working of His mighty power, 
which He wrought in Christ when 
He raised Him from the dead, and 
set Him at his right hand, (His own 
right hand) in the heavenly places, 
far above all principalities, and 
power and might and dominion 
and every name that is named, not 
only in this world, but also, in tl^ 
world to come, and hath put all 
things under his feet, and gave him 
to be the head over all things to the 
church, which is His body, the full- 
ness of him that filleth all in all. 



Great and wondrous results of thp 
work of the mighty hand of God. 
How thankful we should be for the 
least evidence of the fact that thi?> 
leaven of grace has been placed by 
the hand of God into these poor 
hearts of ours, that we may have 
hope and understanding of the d^ 
vine description above of what we 
have in God through Christ his 
blessed Son and our only Saviour. 
We should not cease to give thanks 
to God for this revelation and wis- 
dom, remembering that he is yet far 
above all principalities and powers 
and that he, God, is our Creator 
and Preserver, even our All in All. 

Precious thought and blessed 
hope, that we can embrace him as 
our Heavenly Father. When in a 
satisfying condition and fully leav- 
ened by this grace, we can exclaim 
and say, What is there here to court 
my stay, or keep me back from 
home when angels beckon me away. 
And Jesus bids me come? Then 
we can see that in the past, in the 
present and also in the ages to come 
that God has and will show to us 
the exceeding riches of His king- 
dom in grace through Jesus Christ, 
for by grace are ye saved through 
faith, and that not of ourselves, for 
it is the gift of God, not of works, 
lest any man should boast. This 
leaven or grace is freely given for 
the perfecting of the saints and 
leads to peace and love, if so be 
that we have heard him and 
have been taught by him as the 
truth is in Jesus. Therefore have 
no fellowship with the unfruitful 
works of darkness, but ratlier re- 
prove them, for it is a shame to 
speak of those things which are 
done in secret. Then we are ad- 
monished to awake from sleep, re- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



181 



deeming the time, and to give 
thanks unto God the Father, put- 
ting on the whole armor of God. 
In these things we are fully assured 
that we will be able to stand and 
come out more than conquerors, 
through him who loved us and gave 
His life to redeem us from corrup- 
tion. This leaven in our hearts 
produces sufficient light and 
knowledge to enable us to walk in 
the precepts and commands of our 
heavenly Father and earnestly con- 
tend for gospel order and Bible dis- 
ci]jline in our private and public 
worship and when we do otherv/ise 
we are made to suffer the penalties 
of such error here in this life, that 
is we lose some of the joy of salva- 
tion. 

May the peace of God, this holy 
leaven, which passeth all under- 
standing, keep you, dear reader, in 
the way of holiness, that love, 
unity and sweet peace may abound 
and that we may lead an upright 
life here in Godliness and honesty 
and give thanks unto the Father, 
which hath made us meet to be par- 
takers of the inheritance of the 
saints in light, who hath delivered 
us from the power of darkness and 
hath translated us into the kingdom 
of his Son, in whom we have re- 
demption through his blood, even 
the forgiveness of sins, for God has 
called us unto holiness, • then a 
Christian walk and godly coversa- 
tion is to be manifested. The ef- 
fect of this leaven is seen and felt 
more or less by those with whom we 
come in contact. Then let us pray 
the dear Lord to "Furnish us with 
light and power, to walk in wis- 
dom's ways; so shall the benefits be 



ours, And thou shalt have the 
praise." 

J. W. Jones, 
Peachland, N. C. 



COMFORTED BY THEIR 
LETTERS. 

Elder O. J. Denny, 
Dear Brother: 

I feel it my duty to write to the 
dear brethren and sisters to let 
them know I have been comforted 
so many times by reading their soul- 
cheering letters through the col- 
umns of The Landmark. 

I have written some few pieces 
for the paper, but knowing myself 
as I do, and feeling if the dear ones 
of the household of faith knew me, 
what I might write would be no 
comfort to them. But trusting the 
all-wise God will lead my weak 
mind and guide my trembling hand, 
I will write something that will 
reach some weary traveler. But 
unless I am guided from on high 
what I shall write will never reach 
the child of God. And I want to 
say in the beginning that I feel to 
be the least in my Father's king- 
dom, if indeed one at all. Oh, if I 
could speak as one of old, who said. 
The Lord God hath given me the 
tongue of the learned, that I should 
know how to speak a word in sea- 
son to him that is weary, he waken- 
eth morning my morning, he wak- 
eneth mine ear to hear as the learn- 
ed." Isaiah, 50 :4. 

Another year is past and gone. 
We have had mixtures of joy and 
sadness. What the future has in 
store is unknown to us. Many of 
whom we love have been called to 
the great beyond. Oftimes we are 
made to bow down in sorrow and 



182 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



mourn because of separation, and 
were it not for the abiding grace, 
love and mercy of our God we 
would surely sink into an unbear- 
able condition. I have been made to 
realize more than ever before in my 
past life my weakness and inability 
to trust in the Lord at all times. I 
realize the weakness in the flesh. 
How hard sometimes it is to crucify 
the flesh. Sometimes when sorrow 
encompass me round I feel that 
surely the Lord is gone, and I find 
myself trying to think of some good 
I have done in the world that might 
entitle me to some blessing from His 
bountiful hand. 

Yes, dear ones, I try sometimes to 
walk alone, but like the Apostle 
Peter, I soon find that I am sinking 
and that the Lord must save or I 
shall perish. Oh, how many times 
I have tried to find something good 
in myself. But all is as filthy rags 
and I always realize that I am noth- 
ing and less than nothing. But 
many times when it seemed that 
there was nothing but darkness in 
my view, and the dark cloud of 
doubt hovered over my poor soul, I 
would find a spark lingering with- 
in which caused me yet to hope that 
grace had made me free. And 
when I could open my Bible and 
read the sweet promises therein, 
how the people of God in the Apos- 
tolic Age had doubts and fears, my 
soul then could be encouraged to 
trust in the Lord and fight on, 
hoping that Jesus had won the bat- 
tle for me. 

The Landmark has been a great 
comfort to me. Oftimes its pages 
come laden with sweet manna from 
on high. Oh, for tongues to praise 
that I may praise God for such 



timely gifts as we have in our dear 
editors. May each of you be en- 
dowed with the Spirit of the most 
high God, that you may walk in th^ 
footsteps of Jesus and boldly con- 
tend for the truth and press on in 
the high calling wherewith you are 
called. You will be tried and p 
secuted by the world, you will meet 
oppositions all the way. Remem 
ber they persecuted the saints be- 
fore you. We hear the sweet com- 
forting words of Jesus saying, "Be 
of good cheer. I have overcome 
the world." 

Then we hear the great Apostle 
Paul, after he had suffered perse- 
cutions and imprisonment, saying 
in his last days, "Yea, and all they 
that will live godly in Christ Jesus 
shall suffer persecutions.' We hear 
him again, when he is about to be 
offered up, saying, "I have fought 
a good fight, I have finished my 
course, I have kept the faith. 
Henceforth there is laid up for me 
a crown of righteousness, which the 
Lord, the righteous judge, shall 
give me at that day. And not to 
me only, but to all them that love 
his appearing." How comforting 
it is to read these timely expressions 
of a man of God when our poor 
souls are loaded with sadness and 
cast down. What a blessing that 
our poor eyes can glance over the 
pages of Holy Writ, and our hearts 
find a moment of joy in the sweet 
hope that one day we shall lay our 
armor by and say with Paul, "I am 
ready to be offered up," etc. I had 
rather have the sweet assurance 
that Paul had than to possess a 
thousand worlds like this. Nothing 
of a worldly nature. No, neither 
how costly, can not give such com- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



183 



fort to a poor, tossed, tired soul. 
Surely, every sorrow that has enter- 
ed the heart will vanish when we 
behold the smiles of a never dying 
Saviour, and hear Him say, "I have 
paid the debt, your battle is won, 
your fighting is over, come home." 

Sometimes I feel like I want to 
cross over. I grow so tired of sin 
and trials, and trouble. I find so 
many thorns and thistles as I jour- 
ney the rugged pathway. I long 
for home and rest. The Old Bap- 
tist Church is all the treasure I 
want on earth. If not mistaken 
the blessed Lord has shown me the 
beauties of Zion, and as I grow old- 
er I still love her dearly. I love 
thy kingdom. Lord, the house of 
thine abode. I do know I love 
God's little ones. I love the doc- 
trine of God our Saviour, I want 
to follow after the old paths. It 
gives me great consolation to read 
after the old writers and to know 
I believe just what they do. He 
can work and none can hinder. He 
wounds and He heals. He kills 
and makes alive. Oh, the great- 
ness of God. I wish I could sinr 
His praises so it could be heard in 
all the world, but I know it takes 
the Lord to prepare the ground; it 
takes Him to open the blinded eyes 
and it takes Him to open the deaf 
ears. Without the Lord we can do 
nothing and with His help we car 
do all things. 

To believe this, does my soul 
good. Salvation belongs unto the 
Lord. Thy blessing is upon thy 
people. Perhaps I had better 
bring my poor writing to a close, 
feeling that I have intruded on your 
valuable time and crowded out 
something far better. May our 



merciful God spare you many days 
yet. May He guide you in the way 
He would have you go. I have 
feasted many times on your writ- 
ings, also many more of the dear 
brothers and sisters too numerous 
to mention. I ask an interest in 
the prayers of all God's children. I 
am a poor beggar begging for 
mercy and do not feel like I deserve 
it. If any get comfort from this, 
give God the praise. It would be 
a great comfort to me to get a let- 
ter from any of the dear children of 
God. May the saving grace be 
with us all now and forever more, 
is the prayer of my poor heart. Be 
with us through life, stand by us in 
death and save us in heaven, fo 
Jesus' sake. 

In love and sweet fellowship, 
Mrs. Elgie Williams, 
R. J, Garner, X. C. 

A TIMELY EDITORIAL. 

Elder O. J. Denny, 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Dear Brother Denny: 

I have just returned from a tour 
in Florida and South Georgia, and 
have read your timely editorial, 
"Let Us Reason Together," which 
is very timely and I trust may ac- 
complish great good in promoting 
peace and fellowship among ortho- 
dox Primitive Baptists. In all my 
travels I find our people agreed on 
the grand essentials — the Sover- 
eignty of God, the Predestination 
(Rom. 8:29,30; Eph. 1:5), and 
Election (Eph. 1:4; 1 Thess. 4:13; 
Rom. 9:10-13; 1 Pet. 1:1-5); Spe- 
cial Atonement, Effectual Calling, 
Final Preservation, Resurrection of 
the bodies of the just and unjust 
and that the joys of the righteous 



184 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



and punishment of the wicked will 
be interminable ; that the Primitive 
Baptists are the organic body or 
church of God and since His King- 
dom is not of this world they should 
stand aloof from all the institutions 
of men, religious or oath bound se- 
cret orders. 

The great body of our people 
hold as you, Elder Hassell and hosts 
of others that discipline belongs ex- 
clusively to the church and Associa- 
tions are gatherings of the saints to 
worship God without the slightest 
disciplinary authority over the 
churches. 

All hold that God's relation to- 
ward holiness is causative and His 
attitude toward sin is over-ruling 
and restrictive. God is not the 
cause, author or approver of sin. 

Since unscriptural terms are con- 
fusing, would it not be far bette? 
to use Bible terms on controverted 
points? God's doctrine needs no 
prefixes nor suffixes to strengthen 
it. The admonitions, command- 
ments and exhortations are to the 
living children of God. Life pre 
cedes faith, belief, repentance, 
hearing, seeing, prayer, hungering 
and thirsting after righteousness. 
None believe that our eternal salva- 
tion is conditional (Matt. 1:21; 
Acts 4:12; 2 Tim. 1:9; Heb. 7:25; 
10:14). We need the grace of 
God continually and praise Him for 
every deliverance. 

"Come, let us reason together." I 
endorse every sentiment in your 
editorial and I am sure the Baptists 
of the United States do. The Bap- 
tists most generally endorse the 
doctrines as advocated by the late 
Elders Gold, Hassell, Respess, 
Mitchell, Rittenhouse, Chick and a 



host of others. Let us see how 
close together we are. Let us all 
strive in love for the things that 
make for peace. We should love 
the fellowship of our people better 
than any hobby or confusing ex- 
pressions that divide or confuse us. 
We all love an orderly ministry and 
membership who live sober, chaste, 
godly lives. God's servants should 
be humble, kind, tender, loving, for- 
bearing and forgiving. We do not 
appreciate men who sow seeds of 
discord or introduce new doctrines 
or practices. 

I am sure if we could have a bet- 
ter understanding the great body 
would be agreed. Let us all labor 
to that end. 

Your in Gospel bonds, 

LEE HANKS, 
1800 North Decatur Road, 
Atlanta, Ga. 



EXPERIENCE. 

Elder S. L. Moran, 
Dear Brother Moran: 

As it has been on my mind to 
write some of the dealings of the 
Lord with me, I have decided to 
write you of my hope of a glorious 
home after death. I am unable to 
say how long it has been since my 
trouble first began. I once dream- 
ed the world came to an end and I 
saw the tombstones bursting up. 
One night I dreamed I was to die 
the next day. All through the day 
I thought of my dream, thinking it 
would be so. 

In a few days after this one Sun- 
day morning I was to help mother 
milk. While passing the mirror as 
I got my bucket, the thought came 
I am as well and look as well as I 
ever did in life, but before I got 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



185 



but a few steps from the yard, I fell, 
hurting my hip and back and wj: 
unable to get out for nearly five 
months. I was made to think of 
my dream and cried. Lord have 
mercy upon me a sinner. And I 
am made to hope and believe with 
all my heart He was merciful to me. 
There was such a change I thought 
this old world had turned round 
with me. It seemed the Lord said 
to me, you will not die. I felt so 
calm and happy I rejoiced much, 
even if I was down so badly afflict- 
ed. Any one can be brought down 
humble so quickly. 

But I didn't think anything about 
joining the church, until one Sun- 
day while at Church Elder J. H. 
Cummings preached so wonderful 
to me. I had heard preaching be- 
fore but this was the first sermon I 
ever understood. He told my feel- 
ings better than I could myself and I 
was made to shed tears of joy. This 
revived my hope and made me 
think I had an experience, as 
could hear and understand the 
preaching after this better than 
ever did before. I have never 
known whether I was awake or 
asleep, but one night it appeared 
the Old Baptists were like a straight 
fence — each rail was laid down so 
straight all together. 

Once while churning I was in 
such trouble I did not know what 
was the matter, and all at once I 
arose to my feet singing, "A few 
more days on earth to spend, And 
all my toils and cares shall end. 
And I shall see my God and friend. 
And praise His name on high." I 
was made to shed tears of joy 
thinking if it could be with me, as 

i expressed in this song. 

I 



One night these words came so 
forcibly to my mind, "A change of 
life by the Holy Ghost was what it 
took to enter the kingdom of 
heaven." 

Later some kind of bird came to 
me one night and spread his wings 
over my breast. I think this was 
an angel. 

My sister Ella and myself went 
to the home of a friend to spend 
Saturday night with the thought in 
mind we would go to Payne's Creek 
Primitive Baptist church on Sun- 
day. Next morning Sister Ella said 
to me, I have promised to join the 
church today. I never said what I 
would do for I was at a loss to know 
what to do. After services at the 
church, an invitation for members 
was given. When I saw Sister 
Ella start, I had to go and got there 
by the time she did. I have never 
been able to remember how I got 
there, but after she told her experi- 
ence, I had good liberty to tell the 
reason of my hope, was received 
and baptized by the pastor, Elder 
J. H. Cummings. 

I desire to leave this for my hus- 
band and family as well as the 
church. Believing the Lord will do 
right. This is my prayer. In hope 
your sister, 

Mrs. Delia Moran Conner 
(Wife of George L. Conner) 
Copper Hill, Va., R. 2, Box 104. 



IN FEEBLE CONDITION. 

Dear Bro. and Sister Vail: 

I have thought about you many 
times this past winter while lying 
on a bed of sickness, and I want to 
tell you something about our sick- 
ness. 

My wife and I were taken down 



186 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



with a bad cold about the 25th of 
January. My wife soon got better 
of her cold but I grew worse and it 
ran into "flue", and the bad part of 
it is the disease settled in my kid- 
neys and bladder. I suffered in- 
tense pain for a long time and at 
times I thought I would surely die. 
I passed considerable blood with 
my urine for several nights and 
days. I am now just able to move 
around a little. If I go to the wood 
house to get a stick or so of wood I 
am all out of breath and have to 
sit down. I haven't been to the 
meetings at Frying Pan for the last 
two months. I fear sometimes that 
I shall never be able to get there 
again. 

I am writing you this to let you 
know the reason why I have not 
written you before this. 

I do hope and trust that this let- 
ter will find you both well and able 
to get around. I would be delight- 
ed to write you a spiritual letter but 
I am all in the dark now and don't 
know at times that I have ever been 
in the true light of the Son of the 
most high God. It is a question 
with me. Has God ever shined 
into my heart and given me the 
light of knowledge of the glory of 
God in the face of Jesus Christ? 

It is a question with me, "Am I 
His, or am I not." I was somewhat 
surprised to see my letter written 
to you published in the Landmark. 
Of course, it was yours to do with 
as you saw best and I am not going 
to scold you for having it published. 

I expect to renew my subscription 
again to the Landmark in a few 
days as my time runs out the first 
of next month. 

We will be glad to have a good 
letter from you soon, telling us 
how you are both getting along in 



this low ground of sin and sorrow. 

My wife joins me in much love 
and best wishes to both of you. 

Your poor weak brother 
and sister, 
J. F. and Margaret Oliver 
Herndon, Va. 



FAITH IN THE SAVIOUR 
SUSTAINED HIM. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co., 

Wilson, North Carolina, 
Dear Editor : 

Enclosed you will please find a 
P. O. Money Order for two dollars 
($2.00) for which please renew my 
subscription to Zion's Landmark 
for a year. 

I regret that I have been without 
the blessed message for this length 
of time, but it is one of those un- 
avoidable cases. Also the time has 
seemed so much longer than it 
really has been. 

It has been my misfortune to 
have a very bad leg for an extensive 
time. Not so long ago I got it bro- 
ken. Since I am seventy-nine (79) 
years of age there was little or no 
hope of the bone in my leg healing 
as the bone tissue and cartilage 
would tear down more rapidly than 
they could build up. 

I went to the hospital Monday, 
February second. My leg was am- 
putated, Tuesday, February 3rd. 

It is my belief that my firm faith 
in the Saviour took me through. I 
stayed in the hospital almost three 
weeks. My family worried about 
me but I had faith that the Lord 
Jesus that had watched over me 
this long would not fail me then. 
He didn't and by His will and 
grace I'm to be spared with my 
loved ones awhile longer. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



187 



I am writing this as a tribute to 
the blessed Lord and hope to see 
this in print. Because I want 
others to know that I am willing 
and eager to bear my troubles with- 
out flinching when I have His 
strength to support me. 

With sincerest regards and love 
of brotherhood to all the sisters and 
brothers. 

May all that read this be blessed, 
M. B. HART, 
R. F. D. No. 2, Box 72, 
Marianna, Florida. 



LIKES THE LANDMARK. 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co., 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Editor: 

I am enclosing a check for one 
dollar for which please extend my 
subscription to your excellent pa- 
per, the Landmark, for six months 
longer. I like your paper and 
think you have excellent writers for 
it. 

I have been sick quite a while the 
past winter and feel now quite fee- 
ble and weak. My doctor told me 
I had the "Flu." I know this much 
that I suffered intense pains the 
most of the time during my sick- 
ness. 

I am glad that Elder J. T. Rowe 
is one of the associate editors on the 
editorial staff. I enjoy reading 
his editorials for the Landmark. I 
have known Elder Rowe personally 
for about 40 years and have heard 
him preach many beautiful ser- 
mons. 

All the rest of your editors on the 
Editorial Staff are able writers. I 
enjoy reading all the letters pub- 
■■ lished in the dear old Landmark, 
■ and I would love to write for it my- 



self but am too old and feeble to 
write letters any more. I am will- 
ing to give up the field for other 
gifted writers to glean in. 

But I must close. 

Wishing you all much success 
and that the Landmark may live 
for many years to come. 

A sinner saved by grace if saved 
at all. 

JOHN F. OLIVER, 
Herndon, Virginia. 



PLEASED WITH ARTICLE. 

Elder O. J. Denny, 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Dear Bro. Denny: 

The Feb. 15th issue of Zion's 
Landmark came to hand today. I 
read your editorial and if the en- 
dorsement of the unworthy writer 
is worth anything to you, you have 
it, in regard to this piece. I had 
been hoping the Lord would so di- 
rect your mind as to write along 
this line. 

We are all weak creatures and 
only stand as we are upheld by Sov- 
ereign Grace. How beautiful it 
would be if we could all abide in 
the calling wherein we are called, 
and allow others the same privilege. 
We need one another, and every 
gift. 

If we indeed are so highly favor- 
ed to be a member of the household 
of faith, we are servants, and ac- 
countable to the Master. In preach- 
ing God's predestination, I feel it 
should be made clear, by Predesti- 
narians that God does not cause 
men to sin, but that sin is a manifes- 
tation of the carnal life of men and 
women by transgression of laws, 
etc. The comforting thought with 
us all should be in the thought that 



188 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



where sin abounds Grace has 
much more abounded. And that 
the Providential care and keeping 
of the people of God is so wonder- 
ful that the hairs of their head are 
all numbered, etc. And that God 
is overruling all things to the good 
of his chosen people. 

In hope, 

D. V. SPANGLER, 

Cascade, Va. 



LANDMARK A COMFORT. 

My dear Mr. Gold: 

Inclosed is a check which will 
pay up my subscription to April 1st 
1932, and I want to tell you I do so 
much appreciate your kindness in 
sending my Landmark to me, as I 
don't want to miss a copy. I enjoy 
reading it so much and where I am 
located I don't hear preaching as of- 
ten as I used to, and you have no 
idea how much comfort I get out of 
dear old Landmark. Hoping you 
may always be able to publish it for 
the lovers of our faith and order. I 
have never known you personally, 
but have heard Brother Gold speak 
so often of you when in our home. 
Respectfully, 
Mrs. Koma H. Satterfield, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



LIKE WAY LANDMARK IS 
CONDUCTED. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 
Dear friend: 

Find check enclosed. I intended 
sending you this two weeks ago, 
and deposited the $2.00 in bank so 
as to send check, but sickness pre- 
vented me. 

I once thought the stress of cir- 
cumstances was such that I could 
not pay for it this year, but am now 



pleased to remit. And if I do not 
pay again when due, please stop it, 
as I do not wish to owe anything. 
We like the way you have conduct- 
ed the paper, and enjoy it. And 
we cherish the memory of your 
father. 

SALLIE B. HOLLAND, 

Axton, Va. 



ENJOYS HIS CORRESPONDENCE 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 

Wilson, N. C. 
Dear Mr. Gold: 

In March 15th Landmark, Page 
134, in my letter to Dr. B. T. Cox, is 
a sentence reading "but I can't 
write," which is incorrect. I can 
write some and I greatly enjoy my 
correspondence. 

Yours truly, 
H. L. BRAKE, 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 



CAN'T GET ALONG WITHOUT 
THE LANDMARK. 

Mr. John Gold, 
Dear Sir : 

Encloser find one dollar for the 
Landmark. If my memory serves 
me right, I am behind in paying 
since September 15, 1930. I wish I 
could pay in advance, but at pres- 
ent I can't. I'll try if the Lord 
wills to send you more money in 
the near future. It seems like I 
could not make out without the 
paper. I have been reading the 
Landmark since a child. My 
father and mother took it when 
your father was living. 

I desire the prayers of all Zion's 
children. 

Your friend, 
Mrs. J. S. Smith, 
Wilson Mills, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



189 



Zion's Landmark 



"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Elder M. L. Gilberl^Dade City, 
FU. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV NO. 12 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
aa second class matter 



WILSON, N. C, MAY 1, 1931 



EVERY CAUSE MUST SUFFER 
FROM ITS EXCESSES. 

Great causes, secular and relig- 
ious, have champions, leaders or 
would-be leaders, whose zeal run 
away with good judgment. Such 
men set standards for the conduct 
and belief of others, that cause 
many good people to suffer as the 
result of extreme measures, arbi- 
trary requirements, and the cause, 
I or order of the whole body, politic 
1 or religious, suffers, unduly, by the 
excesses of the few. 

Because a few would be leaders 
go to extremes, in doctrine or prac- 
j tice, it is not right to condemn the 
multitude who may be directly or 
j indirectly affiliated with them, 
I when it is evident that the rank and 
! file of the people associated, in 



Church or Association, are, at hearl, 
in line with Gospel cruth and order; 
but instead of wichdrawing from or 
condemning the whole body, those, 
only, who are disorderly, unfaithful 
or unsound should first be labored 
with, faithfully, and patiently, and 
if not reclaimed let such be with- 
drawn from as individuals, and 
that; after due labor, rather than 
try to curb the af^ti-'f ies and privi- 
leges of the individual offender by 
wholesale resolutions. 

Churches, Associations and other 
groups of people banded together 
in a common cause, often suffer 
criticism, ostracism and are some- 
times condemned, and withdrawn 
from because of the extremes, ex- 
cesses, and trouble peddling habits 
of a very small majority of their 
numbers. 

Blanket resolutions condemning 
large groups in order to circum- 
scribe the activities, and privileges 
of the few; who may be more or 
less objectionable, often make us 
feel that the remedy applied was 
worse than the trouble, attempted 
to be righted. 

How much better it would be to 
deal with individual offenders, at 
the source, in their home churches, 
and keep such troubles localized, 
rather than attempt to curb the lib- 
erties and activities of the individ- 
ual by severing correspondence or 
otherwise establishing bars among, 
and between, good brethren, who, 
at heart, are one people. 

If an individual is dropped from 
a church without labor, it is usually 
condemned readily, and yet some 
who are quick to condemn such an 
act, will take part in dropping cor- 
respondence with a sister associr ■ 



190 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



tion or name men with whom they 
will not fellowship without taking 
any part, whatever, in an effort to 
restore or save the man declared 
against, in an orderly manner, or 
without labor to save the corre- 
spondence, the church, or associi 
tions declared against. 

We are inclined to think some- 
times that we are not as well agreed 
as of old. We often hear state- 
ments to the effect that things are 
different now, that peace, love and 
unity once prevailed quite general- 
ly; but a search of the records do 
not show that to have been true, ex- 
cept for short periods, and in some 
churches and associations; but the 
fact is evident that our people have 
had much contending and friction 
much of the time from time to time 
for ages past. 

We quote from a minute of an as- 
sociation, of thirty churches and a 
membership of 2039, held 118 years 
ago. They had a number of quer- 
ies come up, showing more or less 
trouble. They showed received 
by experience (during the year 146, 
by letter 150. Excluded 66, lost by 
death 6. 

One of the queries read as fol- 
lows : 

"Query from Church. 

"Suppose a church of an hundred 
members, constituted on certain 
principles which were approbated, 
and the church incorporated into 
the union of the association, should 
ninety of her members together de- 
part from the principles, either in 
faith or in practice, on which they 
were constituted; which would be 
considered the church, the ninety 
or the ten, or so as to apply to any 
number? Answer. The ten, if 
essence be found. 



Note their statement, the ten, if 
essence be found? We conclude 
that they knew as we all know that 
family troubles more or less unfit all 
concerned, since usually all go more 
or less to extremes. 

May the Lord so bless our people 
that we may have less friction and 
confusion ; more of the spirit of the 
Lord Jesus Christ in evidence, that; 
we may be found walking in hum 
ble obedience to His will and bt 
found seeking gospel grounds, and 
scriptural terms that will cause our 
people to look over each other for 
good and not for evil, letting their 
light so shine before men that 
others may be constrained to glori- 
fy God and seek the peace of Zion. 

In hope, 

O. J. DENNY. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Sister Penny Davenport was born No- 
vember 1st, 1858. She joined the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church at Concord at the age 
of 13. 

1st. Therefore vhe church at Concord 
has lost her oldest member, therefore we 
bow in humble submission to the all-wise 
God of all good. 

2nd. That by the death of Sister Dav- 
enport her family has lost their best friend 
(naturally) and especially her husband, 
who is totally blind. 

3rd. That a copy of these resolutions 
be placed on our church bocli, and a copy 
be sent to her family and a copy to Zion's 
Landmark for publication. 

Written by order of the church in con- 
ference on Saturday before the 4th Sunday 
in March, 1931. 

Elder W. M. Stubbs, Moderator 
A. W. Ambrose, Church Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas it pleased God, on Jan. 25th., 
1931, to remove from our church another 
one of our faithful members, our dear sis- 
ter Martha Pringle. The church is made 
sad over the loss of so many of our older 
members. Hoping that God, who is rich in 
mercy will guide the younger members 
and keep us in the old paths and will not 
let us depart from the old Landmarks 
which have been set by our forefather.';. 

Therefore be it resolved. 

First, That Great Swamp Church bow in 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



191 



humble submission to the will of God. 

Though we will miss her presence, we 
feel our loss is her eternal gain, and her 
memory will ever live with us. 

Second, That this church extend to the 
bereaved family their sympathy, hoping 
that the God of all grace will comfort 
them. 

Third, that these resolutions be record- 
ed on our record and a copy sent to Zion's 
Landmark for publication. 

Done by order of Conference, Saturday 
before the fourth Sunday in February, 
1931. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Moderator, 
Lena Harrington, Clerk. 



MRS. VICTORIA COLEMAN 

It is with sad hearts that we attempt to 
; write an obituary of our dear sister, Mrs. 
; Victoria Coleman, who departed this life 
I the 30th day of October 1930, she being 
I nearly eighty years old. 
j Sister Coleman first joined the church 
j at Moon's Creek, Caswell County, N. C. 
j She moved her membership to Lickfork 
Church nearly forty years ago, where she 
remained a faithful member until death. 
' She attended her church meetings as long 
' as she was able, and was held in highest 
' esteem and fellowship by her fellow 
members. 

, I The funeral was conducted by her pas- 
|j tor, Elder J. W. Gilliam, at her home 
near Stokeland, Va., in the presence of a 
large number of sorrowing friends, and 
relatives. 

Sister Coleman will be greatly missed, 
but we desire to bow in humble submission 
to our Heavenly Father, who doeth all 
things well. 

Therefore be it resolved: 

1st, That in the passing of our beloved 
sister, we have lost a faithful member, but 
we believe that our loss is her eternal 
,'i gain. 

2nd, That we extend our sympathy to 
the bereaved family. 

3rd, That a copy of these resolutions be 
spread upon our minutes, one sent to the 
family, and one to Zion's Landmark, for 
publication. 

Done by order of the church at Lick- 
fork, 1st Saturday in February, 1931. 

Elder J. W. Gilliam. Moderator 
C. L. Saunders, Clerk. 



LOUISE GOPP WATSON 

I feel very sad, and lonely as I take my 
pen in hand to try to write the obituary 

my dear mother, Louise Goff Watson, 
ivho departed this life, December 14, 1930, 

Mama was born March 9, 185 7, making 
ler stay on earth 73 years, 9 months and 
,1 days. She was married to J. W. Wat- 
ron, November 28, 1889, who passed on 
Tune 10, 1914. 

J She was a true wife, and an extremely 



devoted mother, who always wanted to 
keep the least pain away from her chil- 
dren, as long as she was able, I have 
known her to get up many times after 
midnight, to go to a sick friend. 

Mama was never satisfied unless she 
was at work, and tried so hard to do her 
day's work, when she could hardly sit up. 
She had been troubled for years with high 
blood pressure and a bad heart, and the 
night before Thanksgiving she took her 
bed, never to leave the room again. 

She bore her suffering with great pa- 
tience, never complaining, until a pain 
would become so intense, that she could 
not be quiet, then she would ask us to do 
something for it. 

For a week mama did not sleep a wink. 
The last two days and nights, she was in 
a stupor, and passed away like that, not 
knowing any of us when we went to her. 
She was laid to rest in the Pitt burying 
ground near Pine Tops, and Elder A. M. 
Crisp held a short service at the home, 
being unable to go to the grave. Mama 
was not a member of the Primitive Bap- 
tist Church, but I know in my heart that 
she wanted to be, and she loved the bro- 
thers and sisters as if she had been one of 
them. 

She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. 
Joseph Edwards and Miss Mary S. Watson, 
of Pine Tops, one brother, B. F. Goff of 
Fountain, and two grand children, be- 
sides many nieces and nephews. 

Sleep, dear mother, sleep 
And take your sweet rest, 
You have surely earned it 
And God knew best. 

Dear mother you have left us. 
But sweet memories linger here. 
And sometimes, when I am sad, 
I feel that you are near. 

In silence you suffered. 
With patience you bore. 
Until God called you home. 
To suffer no more. 

Written by her loving daughter, 
Mary S. Watson, 

Pine Tops, N. C. 



IVIRS. EMMA EVELYN BROWN 

Mrs. Emma Evelyn Brown, of Wilming- 
ton, N. C., wife of J. D. Brown departed 
this life on December 24th., 1930. 

She was the daughter of Bryant and 
Mary E. Williams of Onslow County, 
North Carolina. 

She was married to J. D. Brown in the 
year 1887 and to this union were born sev- 
en children, three sons and four daughters 
as follows: G. A., J. Arthur and T. L. 
Brown, Mrs. O. C. Hill and Mrs. John D. 
Grant of Wilmington, Mrs. W. Albert 
Brown of Goldsboro, N. C, and Miss Olive 
Brown of Durham, N. C. 



192 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



The deceased joined the Primitive Bap- 
tist church in the city of Wilmington in 
1908 and remained a devoted member 
until her death. Sister Brown was a 
great sufferer in her last days, but bore 
same patiently and with Christian forti- 
tude, believing that the sufferings of this 
present time were not worthy to be com- 
pared with the glory that shall afterwards 
be revealed in us. Sister Brown was a 
loving wife, a devoted mother and a kind 
neighbor and took great delight in enter- 
taining her brethren and friends in her 
home and while we mourn her departure 
we mourn not as those without hope for 
we have every assurance to believe she is 
now resting from all her labor. 

The funeral was conducted at the home 
by her pastor, Elder R. D. Gurganus, and 
the writer in the midst of a large con- 
course of relatives and friends, the body 
was laid to rest beneath a beautiful 
mount of flowers in the city cemetery to 
await the second coming of our blessed 
Lord, who shall change and fashion our 
mortal bodies like unto his own precious 
body, where we hope to spend an endless 
eternity in the very presence of God. 

Written by request, 

S. B. Denny. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Resolutions of respect to the memory of 
our beloved Brother J. R. Lindsey, who 
was born July 19, 1856 and departed this 
life at his home in Nash County, N. C, 
January 14, 1931, aged 74 years, 5 months. 
He was our faithful and efficient clerk. 

First, that in the death of Bro. Lindsey 
the church at Sapphony has sustained ir- 
reparable loss, the loss as it were of one 
of her pillars; the community a kind 
frined and neighbor. 

Second, that while we deeply mourn 
our sad bereavement we desire to humbly 
bow in submission to the will of him who 
is too wise to err and too good to be un- 
kind. 

Third, that we extend our heart felt 
sympathy to his bereaved family and es- 
pecially to his afflicted wife who was lying 
by his side when the good Lord called, 
"Child, come home." Bro. Lindsey died 
suddenly. He was complaining a few days 
before death. He passed away in his 
sleep. Bro. Lindsey leaves two children, 
one son and daughter and wife and some 
grandchildren. 

Brother Lindsey joined the church at 
Sapphony, the second Sunday in May, 1887 



and soon was elected clerk, which office 
he served faithfully until death. Bro. 
Lindsey was a faithful man to every duty 
that lay in his power. 

The funeral services were conducted by 
R. H. Boswell in the midst of a host of 
friends and neighbors and the deceased 
was buried in the family burying ground 
to await the last call to eternal life. 

Done by the order of Conference. 

J. T. Williams, Moderator 
N. M. Joyner, Clerk. 



MRS. FANNIE A. JOYNER. 

In memory of our departed sister, Fan- 
ie A. Joyner, who departed this life, De- 
cember 27, 1930. Sister Joyner was born 
May 16, 18 70, aged 60 years. Sister 
Joyner united with the church at Sapphony 
the third Sunday in September, 1922, and 
was a faithful member until death. The 
good Lord saw fit to take her husband the 
same year, April 14. He was a good man 
to her and his children. He left her with 
one son, the youngest, to battle with this 
life alone. But she bore her sorrow and 
labored honestly with her hands to sup- 
port the house and those who depended 
on her. Sister Joyner was married to 
Brother John Joyner. The writer does not 
know the exact time. To this union were 
born six children, three boys, and three 
girls, O. J. Joyner, D. S. Joyner, Lillie 
Jones, B. W. Joyner, Austin Joyner, Dave 
Win."tead. She was a faithful wife and 
mother, a good neighbor, and all who 
knew her loved her. 

Elder R. H. Boswell officiated at the 
funeral in the midst of a host of friends, 
and the remains were buried in the fam- 
ily burying ground, to ever be with the 
Lord at His coming. 

Done by the order of Conference. 

J. T. Williams, Moderator 
N. M. Joyner, Clerk. 



BEAR CREEK ASSOCIATION. 

The Spring Session of the Bear Creek 
Primitive Baptist Association is to convene 
with the church at Running Creek, Stanly 
County, N. C, commencing on Saturday 
before first Sunday in May 1931 and con- 
tinue three days. May 2nd, 3rd, and 4th. 
Those from a distance desiring to attend 
please write for instructions, to brother 
J. H. McClure, R. 1, Mount Pleasant, N. C. 
A cordial invitation extended to brethren, 
sisters and friends to attend. 

J. W. JONES, 

Association Clerk. 

Peachland, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

^^^^^^^^^ AT ~ 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 

VOL. LXIV. MAY IS, 1931 No. 13 



THE HEALING WATERS OF Jo ^ v ' /y 

■ -h " . 

"And it was so that, when Elisha the man of God :.. ''i. .y '^e 
King of Israel had rent his clothes, that he sent to the i/ '^<v.y 
Wherefore hast thou rent thy clothes? Let him come now tr-' r. ''' i 
shall know that there is a prophet in Israel. .. 

So Naaman came with his horses and with his chariot, and stood dTi, the 
door of the house of Elisha. 

And Elisha sent a messenger unto him saying, Go and wash in the Jor- 
dan seven times, and thy flesh shall come again to thee, and thou shalt 
be clean. 

But Naaman was wroth and went away, and said, behold, I thought he 
will surely come out to me, and stand, and call on the name of the Lord 
his God, and strike his hand over the place, and recover the leper. 

Are not Abana and Pharpar, rivers of Damascus, better than all the 
waters of Israel? May I not wash in them and be clean? So he turned 
and went away in a rage. And his servants came near and spake unto 
him, and said. My father, If the prophet had bid thee do some great thing, 
wouldst thou not have done it? How much rather then when he said to 
thee, wash and be clean? Then went he down and dipped seven times 
in Jordan according to the saying of the man of God and his flesh came 
again like unto the flesh of a child and he was clean. 

And he returned to the man of God, he and all his company and came 
and stood before him; and he said, behold, now I know there is no God in 
all the earth but in Israel: now therefore I pray thee take a blessing of 
thy servant." — 2 Kings, 5:2-15. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 

ELDER JOEL E. MARSHAL Meadows of Dan, Va. 

$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from tho world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICEI 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. 0. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Bevotc^ to the Cause of ^esus Cbcist 



TRUSTING ALL IN THEE. 

Here I am, dearest Lord, 

Trusting Thee and Thy Word 

For Thou saves souls from hell 
So farewell to the world. 

I come to live with Thee 

The God of the whole earth, 

He gave us a new birth 

That we might live with Thee. 

Up in Heaven above 

All is joy, peace and love. 
Around the throne of God 
In His blessed bright abode. 

Yours in hope, 
J. R. JONES, 
Pilot Mountain, N. C. 



PRIDE IS HUMBLED. 

(Published by Request of 
Miss Z. J. Bass) 
The following incident is told as 
part of the unwritten traditional 
history of Elder John Leland: 

During the latter part of his life 
Mr. Leland travelled very much 
over the country on preaching tours 
on foot. 

On one occasion he had been 
warmly solicited in writing by a 
widow lady, to visit the part of old 
Virginia in which she lived and 
preach, telling him to set a time and 
her house was at his service both as 
a place of abode and also a place 
to hold his meeting. 

Mr. Leland replied to her by set- 



ting a day that he would preach at 
her residence at ten o'clock a. m. 

The lady was a wealthy planter 
in Appomattox Valley. She re- 
garded herself as one of the most 
pious and exemplary persons to be 
found anywhere. She had been 
raised in the high circle of life, and 
knew nothing about poverty, nor 
had ever associated with laboring 
classes. She was about thirty-five 
years of age and had been a widow 
two years, but knew nothing of the 
privations commonly attending the 
life of the widowed mother. She 
took much pains to appear pious, 
and her chief object in inviting Mr. 
Leland to preach at her house was 
that she might make a display o '^ 
wealth, and thus have the applause 
of her associates; not only to show 
her wealth, but her piety as well. 
So she went to great trouble and 
expense in preparing for the meet- 
ing. The appointment had been 
spread far and near — pressing soli- 
citations had been sent to numerous 
friends to attend the meeting. No 
expense or pains had been spared, 
not only to have the best and finest 
of everything, but to have every- 
thing in the very best of style. 

On the evening preceding the 
meeting several carriages had al- 
ready arrived to be in good time, 
and enjoy the hospitality of the 
hostess. About sunset Mr. Leland 
came up to the mansion on foot. 
The day was quite warm and dusty 



194 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



when he made his appearance. The 
walk had caused a free perspira- 
tion, which ran down his cheeks 
making roads in dust which had 
settled on his face during his day's 
walk. He walked up to the door 
of the large stone mansion, and his 
rap was answered by a black ser- 
vant, of whom he inquired for the 
landlady. The servant ran down 
the broad carpeted hall to a door, 
from which proceeded the sound of 
talking and laughing. In a very 
short time a lady, richly attired, 
made her appearance, walking 
briskly and lightly toward the door 
where Mr. Leland was standing. He 
had a fair view of her person, and 
at once read in her physiognomy 
and deportment something of her 
leading traits of character. His in- 
tention had been to introduce him- 
self, but before he had time to 
speak, or before she was near 
enough for him to address her, she 
spoke in rather a harsh tone: "Old 
man what do you want here? I 
have nothing for beggars." 

Mr. Leland in a very soft and un- 
assuming tone said, "Please excuse 
me madam ; I do not wish to beg for 
money. I am very tired from a 
long walk, and called to know if 
you would do me the kindness to 
allow me to stay under your roof 
during the night." "Viewing him 
hastily from head to foot, she very 
positively answered: "No: I have 
company now, and tomorrow Rev. 
Mr. Leland is to preach at my 
house; so I cannot take in poor 
stragglers." "Well," said Mr. Le- 
land, "I am too much fatigued to 
travel further tonight. Will you 
allow me to stay in one of those 
cabins?" (pointing to a row of 
negro houses, just outside of the 
mansion yard.) 



After a moment or two of recol- 
lection she said, "Yes, you may 
stay there with the negroes if you 
want to." He bowed a very polite 
thank you, and turned toward the 
row of huts. He proceeded to the 
furtherest one from the mansion be- 
fore Ije found any one to whom he 
could speak, to ask permission to 
stay, but came at last to the small- 
est, but neatest of all the huts, 
where he found seated at the door 
an old negress, who was fanning 
herself with the wing of a fowl. He 
spoke to her very gently: "Good ev- 
ening aunty." 

His greeting was answered with 
"Good evening, Masta." 

"Well, aunty," said he, "I have 
come to ask a very uncommon favor 
of you." 

"Bless de Lord, masta, what can 
dat be, fo' please God, I'se got nuf- 
fin to give any one." 

"I am very tired from walking 
all day. I called at the house of 
your mistress, but she says she has 
no room for me in her great house. 
I am too fatigued to go further and 
s6 I have come to see if you can al- 
low me a shelter in your house." 

"Bless de Lord, masta, I got no 
commodation for anyone; but fore 
a fellow mortal shall stay out doo's 
I lets 'em stay in my cabin sho if da 
can put up wid my plain hut. Uncle 
Ben be in directly, den he keep ye 
company while I fixes you sumpen 
to eat, for you looks as do you had 
not eat a morsel for a long time." 
(at the same time pointing to a 
three legged stool by. the side of the 
door saying, "Set down dar and rest 
yourself, for you looks so wore 
out." 

Mr. Leland took the seat as di- 
rected, saying at the same time, "I 
am sorry that I am compelled to 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



195 



put you to so much trouble as I have 
no money to pay you." 

"Please God, masta, Aunt Dilsey 
never charges any one yit for sich 
'commodations as I could give 'em, 
for God know^s it's poor enuff at 
best." 

"You say, masta, you call on mis- 
sus at the house door, and she can't 
take you in? Well, you must 
'cuse her, for she's looking for a 
mighty heap o' company tomorrow. 
Bar's a great man to be dar tomor- 
row^, what's gwine preach in her 
house, and a good many folks done 
come a' ready an' heap mo comin' 
tomorrow; and missus is mighty 
busy fixin' for 'em. But here's Un- 
cle Ben," she continued as an old 
gray headed negro came around 
the corner of the cabin muttering 
to himself about the carelessness of 
some other negroes. 

This old couple. Uncle Ben and 
Aunt Dilsey, as they were familiar- 
ly called by all who knew them, 
both black and white, were an old 
couple who from age, had for a 
long time lived in a small but snug 
cabin at the far end of the row of 
huts occupied by the younger and 
more active slaves. Although Un- 
cle Ben was not required to do any 
labor yet he voluntarily took a kind 
of supervision over the farm stock, 
etc. When he saw Mr. Leland he 
stopped and gave him a scrutiniz- 
ing look, when Aunt Dilsey spoke, 
saying: "Uncle Ben, don't stare 
your eyes out at a stranger; dis ole 
gentleman was out traveling, and 
came to stay in our cabin kase 
missus she can't let him stay dar, as 
she's got a heap o' company now." 

"Well," said Uncle Ben, "we's 
commanded dat if a stranger comes 
along we's got to take him in an 



give him sich as we got to set be- 
fore him." 

While Aunt Dilsey was preparing 
supper Mr. Leland learned much 
about the lady of the mansion from 
Uncle Ben; he learned among other 
things that they were a religious 
family, but the hostess had been 
raised in the city of Richmond, and 
had imbibed all the fashionable 
ideas of religion, with but little of 
its true principles, and none of its 
humility. Soon after Mr. Leland 
had finished a very good, coarse 
supper, he told his host that he was 
very much fatigued from a very 
long day's walk, and would like to 
retire for the night and that he felt 
like he wished to return thanks to 
his Creator for the blessings of the 
day and invoke his protection 
through the night. That if he 
would annoy them then he would 
retire to some place out of doors. 
"Bless God," said both old folks at 
the same time, "we allers like 
prayin' in our house and neber goes 
to bed 'thout one of us tries to 
pray." 

Mr. Leland then took an old, 
well-worn Bible out of his little bun- 
dle and read in a very solemn 
tone the one hundred and second 
Psalm. During the reading the two 
blacks often said in a low voice, 
"Amen. Bless de Lord." When 
the Psalm was ended Mr. Leland 
fell on his knees, and poured out his 
feelings in such an outburst of rev- 
erential eloquence as was never 
equaled, and never surpassed by 
mortal lips. His host and hostess 
were so affected by his reading and 
prayer that they could do no more 
or say no more than to fix their 
eyes on their guest as though they 
felt that he was something more 
than a mortal man. He retired to 



196 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



a clean little pallet in one corner of 
the cabin, where he soon fell 
asleep. When morning came he 
was up early. Aunt Dilsey soon 
had him a good repast, after which 
he seated himself to read, telling 
his hostess that he felt too much fa- 
tigued to travel and if she was 
willing he would rest there until 
afternoon anyway, and then if he 
felt better he would go on his way. 

Aunt Dilsey said: "Yes, masta, 
stay just as long as you want to. We 
be glad to have you be with us a 
fortnight, if you can put up with 
our fare." 

Mr. Leland seated himself under 
a shady tree in the cabin yard, and 
with his Bible, waiting to see what 
the finality would be. 

About nine o'clock, everything 
was in a bustle at the stone man- 
sion; the servants were called in to 
dress in their very best. Carriages 
began to arrive by the dozen until 
the hall and every part of the large 
and elegant building was crowded 
to overflowing. But to their dis- 
may no preacher had made his ap- 
pearance, for the last carriage that 
came in sight had been scanned to 
get a glimpse of the minister. No 
one in the large congregation had 
ever seen him, but all had heard of 
him, so every one was full of anx- 
ious expectation supposing that 
when he came he would be drawn 
by two or four fine horses driven 
by a servant in livery. Ten o'clock 
passed, half past ten, eleven o'clock 
was announced by the clock on the 
wall and no minister. The com- 
pany had by this time become rest- 
less, and were about to disperse 
when Aunt Dilsey went to her mis- 
tress and said: 

"Bress de Lord, missus, why don't 
you git dat ole man who stayed in 



our cabin last night to come to de 
door and pray 'fore de folks all go 
home; he prayed in our cabin las' 
night and dis mornin', 'fore God, in 
all my born days I nebber heard 
such prayin' afore. He's sittin' 
right dare now under de tall pine 
tree, and as de preacher's not cum, 
if you'll let him pray, I'll go right 
now and fetch him down." 

The lady consulted with some of 
the company, the matter was talked 
of among the congregation when it 
was agreed to have the old strag- 
gler, as they call him, come and 
pray before the congregation broke 
up. So Aunt Dilsey went to where 
Mr. Leland was sitting, and said, 
"Masta, de folks all dispinted 
bout de praecher comin' ; he am not 
cum and da wants you to go down 
and pray for 'em fore da all brakes 
up. Masta, I wants you to pray jis 
like you did las' night." 

Mr. Leland walked down to the 
front door, and standing on the 
steps, repeated a short hymn by 
memory, sang and then engaged in 
prayer. By the time his prayer 
was ended all eyes were fixed upon 
him with amazement. He then re- 
marked that as there seemed to be 
a disappointment, that if it would 
not be assuming too much he would 
talk to them a few minutes, and as 
a foundation or starting point he 
would read a short passage from 
the word of truth which they would 
find by reference to the thirteenth 
chapter and second verse of 
Hebrews: "Be not forgetful to en- 
tertain strangers, for thereby some 
have entertained angels unawares." 
When he had spoke for twenty or 
thirty minutes the hostess, who had 
refused him the hospitality of her 
house the evening before, became 
so deeply affected that she ran and 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



197 



fell prostrate at the feet of Mr. Le- 
land, and would, if he allowed her 
to do so, have washed his feet with 
her tears and wiped them with the 
hair of her head. It was said that 
she was so overcome and affected 
that from that time forward she 
was a changed and different wo- 
man, so much so that she threw off 
all her finery and ornamental dress- 
ing and became an humble and 
plain Christian. Though she was a 
professor before, her whole deport- 
ment underwent a complete change. 
Her house became a place of 
divine worship where she delighted 
in making all, no matter how plain 
or how poor, as happy as kind at- 
tention could make them. In fact, 
it was said that if preference had to 
be given to any, it was always in 
favor of the poor and needy. 



OLD NOAH. 

A gentleman said to me last 
week, "You are going to preach 
like old Noah did, as long as you 
can." 

And I replied, "Yes, and as few 
perhaps will receive mine as his." 
And this caused me to think of "Old 
Noah." He died when he was nine 
hundred and fifty years old ; and in 
many ways was a wonderful char- 
acter. He was truly called of God 
to preach, and not easily discour- 
aged, for he preached the truth to 
the living people, until the day he 
entered the ark, and the flood came 
and destroyed them all." Luke 
17:27. And the Lord said unto 
Noah, "Come thou and all thy 
house into the ark; for thee have I 
seen righteous before me in this 
generation." Gen. 7:1. He was one 
hundred and twenty years building 
the ark, and the Lord said my spirit 



shall not always strive with man, 
though his days be a hundred and 
twenty years." 

He was a very significant charac- 
ter and it appears that he and his 
household were the only ones 
saved; (eternally saved) at the 
time of the flood. And it came ex- 
actly as he had preached it unto 
them, and they did not believe the 
flood would end the world, any 
more than the people believe the 
truth now, but we certainly live in 
a time when it is as in the days of 
Noah; for as in the days of Noah, 
so shall it be at the coming of the 
Son of Man, which is the second 
coming of Christ to the world. 

I see so many things similar to 
the state, or condition of the people 
in the days of Noah, and I tell you, 
as I see it. He, Christ, may descend 
any day upon the earth, and he 
shall descend with a shout, and the 
voice of the archangel, and the 
trump of God. 2 Thes. 4:16. It is 
said of him "Noah was a just man, 
perfect in his generation, and walk- 
ed with God." 

I asked Elder Hassell at one time 
to prove by the Bible that any were 
saved in the days of the flood ex- 
cept Noah and his wife, his three 
sons and their wives. Also, if he 
could prove by the Bible that any of 
the Pharoah host who were drown- 
ed in the Red Sea were children of 
God, and saved with an eternal 
salvation. 

And he answered, that none of 
these were saved unless there were 
infants among them. I do not con- 
sider this any proof at all. All ad- 
mit that we are living in strange 
times, and while I know I do not act 
like it, I would not be surprised to 
see the end any day. Of course 



198 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



none know the day nor the hour, 
that the son of man cometh, not 
even the Son Himself, "but the 
Father." Then shall we see the 
Son of Man coming in the cloud 
with great power and glory, and we 
all, good and bad, will see him for 
it is written, "We shall see Him who 
was pierced." 

I have said above that the people 
generally now are like they were in 
the days of Noah, and to prove this 
from the Bible I will call attention 
to Gen. 6:12. "And God looked 
upon the earth, and behold it was 
corrupt, for all flesh had corrupted 
his way upon the earth." And verse 
13 we find — "And God said unto 
Noah, the end of all flesh is come 
before me; for the earth is filled 
with violence through them; and 
behold I will destroy them with the 
earth." 

When Noah, with his favored few, 
Was ordered to embark. 
Eight human souls, a little crew. 
Entered on board his ark. 

Though every part he might secure 
With belt or bar or pin, 
To make the preservation sure, 
Jehovah shut him in. 

The waters then might swell their 
tides, 

The billows rage and roar; 
They could not stave the assaulted 
sides, 

Nor burst the battered door. 

So souls that do in Christ believe. 
Quickened by vital faith, 
Eternal life at once receive. 
And never shall see death. 

In Christ, their Ark, they safely 
ride, 



Nor wrecked by death or sin; 
How is it they so safe abide? 
The Lord has shut them in. 

—606 Lloyd Hymn Book. 

It is interesting to read what 
Paul had to say about Noah in Heb. 
11th chapter. 

Noah is classed with Abraham, 
Moses, David, the harlot Rahab and 
Samuel; Sampson and Jephtha, 
and it was said of all of these, "Of 
whom the world was not worthy," 
"And they all died in faith." And 
Noah did not make the difference 
there was in him and those who 
were drowned in the flood, and yet 
there was a vast difference, for 
these antediluvians took right for 
wrong, and wrong for right, and on 
this question it is said, "Who has 
made thee to differ from another, 
and what hast thou that thou didst 
receive." "We love him because 
he first loved us," and if he had not 
chosen us we would have refused 
him still. Eld. Mort. H. Craig ask- 
ed the important question, "Did 
you begin with God? Or did he 
begin with you?" 

Noah, like the people drowned in 
the flood, before he was changed 
there was no "fear of God before 
his eyes," but Paul said in Heb. 11, 
he, Noah, was moved with fear and 
his, like the others, was a move by 
faith. Did he exercise faith, or did 
faith exercise him? 

Noah was one of that class of 
witnesses spoken of by Paul, which 
compass me about, and assure us 
that it is to our credit to lay aside 
every weight, and the sin which 
doth so easily beset us," and to run 
with patience the race set before us. 
I am impressed with what is said of 
Lot (for that righteous man dwell- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



199 



ing among them, in seeing and 
hearing, vexed his righteous soul 
from day to day with their unlaw- 
ful deeds;) But we must end this 
harangue, and fear it is not the 
good spirit in exercise which causes 
us to see as we do, for we see and 
hear that daily which appeals to our 
flesh, and while we know "God 
seeth not as man seeth" yet we see 
and hear enough to provoke the 
Lord to end this violence, for only a 
few seem to know the truth, or care 
for the right. "Darkness has cov- 
ered the earth, and gross darkness 
the people." 

Sodom was destroyed for the sins 
of its inhabitants; and it is a scrip- 
tural fact that only a small per cent 
of them were just ones, for we re- 
member well the visiting angel told 
Lot, "I will not destroy it for ten's 
sake." Lot went out and said to 
his sons-in-law. Up, get you out of 
this place, for the Lord will destroy 
this city, but he sensed as one that 
mocked unto his sons-in-law." Of 
Noah, Paul said he was moved with 
fear, prepared an ark. And if 
there is no fear of God upon us such 
predictions as above seems "as idle 
tales to us;" and when warned as 
we are now people say — "Where is 
the promise of his coming?" For 
since the fathers fell asleep all 
things continue as they were from 
the beginning of the creation, so the 
day of the Lord will come as a thief 
in the night upon all such. 

It appears that the surest sign 
that his second coming draweth 
nigh, is, the great sacrifice that is 
being made to refute the idea of 
such a thing — men are now work- 
ing day and night to prove the fool- 
ishness of such a theory, and we 
could not expect his second coming 
to this earth, when wise men are 



silent upon the subject. But tell 
me where there is the greatest ef- 
fort put forth? Is it not in high 
places? And by the most learned of 
earth that a "lo here, and lo there," 
is most practiced. In Banner- 
Herald for Feb. 1931, Eld. Grouse 
says, "I consider it a sin of the high- 
est degree to teach our people that 
the King James translation of the 
Bible, which is the Bible found in 
all of our homes, is full of mistakes, 
that it is contradictory and teaches 
falsehood and is not to be relied 
upon," etc., so as sin will cause him 
to descend to the earth again will 
it not be at a time when the least 
expected? 

J. T. Satterwhite. 



TWO GREAT POWERS. 

Elder O. J. Denny, 
Beloved Brother: 

I feel to pen you a few thoughts. 
I was told by brother C. W. Dodson 
that he heard you preach at Reids- 
ville last 3rd Sunday. Wish I could 
have been with you, but as I do not 
run a car, therefore I am dependent 
on some one to take my wife and 
me around. 

My mind of late has been exer- 
cised on the two great powers that 
be. And how they are adverse one 
to the other. While we want to 
exalt Jesus Lord of lords, King of 
kings, and crown him Lord of all- 
Now when we read of Satan in his 
attempt to dethrone Jesus, and in 
his treatment of Job, it does seem 
he was just as mean as he knew 
how to be, in both instances. In 
the Garden of Eden and also in 
Job's case he came to face the Lord 
God and also His only begotten 
Son. Oh how brazen? He 
would come up with the sons of 
God to worship. Have been read- 



200 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ing some of the trials of Job. Was 
he not a type of Jesus? He was 
perfect, one mark at least, and 
Jesus said Satan moved him against 
Job without cause as was the case 
in the Father against Jesus. Some 
one had to pay the debt we owed 
that we might be free. I want to 
say the mercy and goodness of God 
reaches all space, the high heavens, 
and depths of hell are open to him. 

Let us get a picture of Job, a per- 
fect man, none like him in all the 
earth, and yet how Satan afflicted 
him in the most cruel manner pos- 
sible. The devil only was able and 
mean enough to do such things. 
Think for a moment of a human 
being having sore boils over his en- 
tire body, no side on which to turn 
without pressure on these many 
sores. Oh how painful, no tongue 
can tell half of his suffering, but 
some try to comfort him in his great 
distress. 

Three comforters came to see 
him. I feel to say they were the 
devil dressed up, and I believe you 
and all of God's ministers meet 
with just such fellows that would 
tell you how and what to preach 
and that all would be well. 

It seems to me. Brother Denny, 
that something concerning the doc- 
trine is shown here, a difference 
probably not noticed by even some 
Primitive Baptists, that is we do not 
believe you can buy a seat in heav- 
en by good works, but when we say 
this, often: some will say we are 
opposed to . good works, which I 
deny for all good Baptists. And 
when I hear a Baptist say there is 
nothing gained in obedience, nor 
nothing lost in disobedience, I dis- 
like it. I do not think it does the 
cause of God justice to leave it that 
way, for Jesus did and taught good 



works while on earth with His dis- 
ciples. While he did reject and 
reprove the Pharisees and hypocrits 
for he knew the wickedness of 
their hearts. 

Again, to be plain, in regard to 
the doctrine, you will hear all, prob- 
ably that claim to be Old Baptists, 
say that you are unable to see until 
quickened and made alive ; so far 
so good, but after that you can live 
so as to make for yourself a life of 
thorns or of flowers. That seems 
to be the doctrine set forth by Job's 
comforters, and it is the doctrine 
loved and set up by the religious 
world today; but Job did not be- 
lieve it and neither do I. The life 
of Job, a perfect man, one that 
feared God and eschewed evil and 
then see what he suffered. 

Last Friday and Friday night, a 
week before, I just could not sleep. 
I thought of you and my son Lester 
and how I did wish you were pres- 
ent with me. I thought of Paul 
and Silas in prison with their feet 
fast in the stocks, but at the hour of 
midnight they prayed and the 
prison door was opened and their 
shackles fell off, but they did not 
run away. They were not thieves 
nor robbers, but God's dear ones, 
and must wait, baptize the jailer, 
and save him from committing sui- 
cide, saying we are all here. I of- 
ten think of certain ones and wish 
we were together to talk of the 
love and goodness of God. Not that 
I do not have good brethren here, 
for I have a good and precious bro- 
ther living near me, and I feel to say 
of him. Elders W. R. Dodd, J. E. 
Herndon, C| T. Evins and J. F. Span- 
gler, that they stand for the true 
doctrine and they are God's heroes, 
for they were in the hottest of the 
battle in our division here, and 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



201 



while I shall not be able to erect a 
monument at their tomb, I believe 
God will bless and comfort them for 
the work he has blest them to do in 
holding up the pure and unadulter- 
ated doctrine of salvation by grace 
and others also that are so faithful 
in defense of this same doctrine. 

I am thinking now of Elders H. 
H. Lefferts, an able defender, and 
how glad I have a son, R. Lester 
Dodson, associated with such men 
as Elders Lefferts, Ruston and 
Vaughn, some more of God's 
heroes, and I want to say to you 
brethren, fight on. Jesus is your 
captain and the victory will soon be 
won and the crown be yours. 

I must stop, my brother, or else 
Mr. J. D. Gold will think I am like 
bad money; always on hand, should 
you have any of this published. 

When my good wife called me to 
dinner I was so interested I did not 
want to stop to eat. At times I feel 
it my duty to write but do not know 
what to say nor how to start. 

Your humble brother in hope of 
eternal life. How I would like some 
time to meet with the children of 
God and join in honor and praise to 
our King. 

Farewell, 

R. L. DODSON, 
3 47 Broad St., Danville, Va. 



We enjoy your letters and trust 
you will write as often as you feel 
disposed. — J. D. Gold. 



EXPERIENCE. 

Dear Brother Dunbar: 

I have been impressed for about 
six yeai-s to write my experiences. 

When I joined the church I did 
not know there was so much con- 
fusion among the Baptists. When 
I heard so much confusion over pre- 



destination and conditional time sal- 
vation, it looked to me like the only 
people that I could claim as my peo- 
ple' were going to war and destroy 
each other. 

I became so troubled there was 
hardly a moment through the day 
that I could get my mind off of this 
condition. How miserable I was! 

One day I saw, but not with my 
natural eyes, two great armies, one 
on either side of me. I could hear 
voices from each army saying, 
come and join us, or you will be de- 
stroyed. I could see something 
about either side that I did not want 
to join. Both sides were marching 
towards me, with swords and guns. 
It seemed I would sink in despair. I 
saw that the only help must come 
from God. In my feelings I prayed 
for God to help me. I looked and 
saw a great shield coming down 
from heaven. It fell about me, and 
shielded me so, that no swords or 
bullets could reach me. When 
the armies saw the perfection, and 
strength of the shield, and saw that 
it came from heaven, they were 
amazed, and dropped their guns 
and swords, and began to praise 
God for his wonderful work and 
forgot their battles. 

When I realized what I was 
doing I was standing gazing up into 
heaven. I looked for the tools I 
was working with. I had dropped 
them to the ground. I looked for 
my comrades. They were all work- 
ing as though nothing had taken 
place. I wiped the tears from my 
eyes and turend back to my work. 
A peaceful glorious time it was. It 
seemed like the little grass and peb- 
bles were praising God. 

Yet, my burden was not all gone, 
for I could not yet understand the 
great questions that were causing 



202 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



all this trouble; but time passed on, 
and this great question of predesti- 
nation grew to be more and more of 
a mystery to me. I would hear one 
say it is one way, another would 
say it is another, and all tried to 
prove by the Bible, their way was 
right. Yet, I knew someone was 
wrong, for they were not agreed. 

I awoke one morning about 4 
o'clock and, O how miserable I was. 
It seemed I would have given ten 
thousand worlds like this, just to 
understand this thing again. I saw 
that the only help must come from 
God. 

How I wished I could pray to 
God; but I saw I was just as help- 
less to pray as I was to understand. 

Just then I saw another great 
wonder. You have seen how mov- 
ing picures appear on the screen. 
That is how this apeared to me. 
First the screen appeared, then a 
line appeared from the top to the 
bottom of the screen in the center. 
On the first side of the screen, as 
we read appeared letter by letter 
until the word "Foreknowledge" 
was there. Then, under this, ap- 
peared all the evils of the world and 
of men from the beginning to the 
end of time. 

Then, on the other side of the line 
appeared letter by letter until the 
word "Predestination" appeared. 
Then under this appeared all the 
works of God, all the predestinated 
purposes of God from the beginning 
to the end of time. 

Then the hand of God appeared. 
It converted all the acts of both 
sides into links, then took the links 
and arranged them as he purposed 
and as he would have them. (Rom. 
8:28), until all the links were se- 
curely fastened in a great chain. 
Then he took the first end of the 



chain and fastened it to a great 
anchor, that all the powers of 
earth and hell could not move, then 
took the last end and fastened it to 
another great anchor that could not 
be moved. Then on the first an- 
chor he wrote Beginning, on the 
chain he wrote Time, and on the 
last anchor he wrote End. 

So I could see that the Beginning 
or the End could not be moved. I 
could see the chain could not be 
broken. Links could not be taken 
out, neither could there be any put 
in. The links of Predestination 
were put in according to the links 
of Foreknowledge. So the chain 
of events of Time was complete. 

It was not all of Foreknowledge, 
it was not all of Predestination; but 
was a combination according to the 
will of God. (Romans 8.29). So 
Brother Dunbar, it was not all Pre- 
destinated; but all the links were 
placed in the chain in the beginning 
that will ever be there. 

Your brother in hope of eternal 
life. 

ROBERT M. STONEMAN, 
549— 30th Street, 
Newport News, Va. 



APPRECIATED THEIR LETTER. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

I hope you will excuse me. I 
feel like I must try to write a little 
more. Enclosed you will please 
find a good letter from our precious 
brother and sister, I. E. Neal and 
wife, of Greensboro Primitive Bap- 
tist Church. It was so comforting 
and consoling to me, I felt like I 
wanted others to enjoy it some too. 
Brother J. O. Key nad wife and I 
enjoyed it much last night. We 
spent many pleasant hours together 
while I lived at Revolution and also 
with many others of our Lord's dear 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



203 



little ones. I would be glad if my 
health was good so I could visit 
them again soon. Your brother, C. 
W. Gold and I used to have some 
very pleasant moments together 
sometimes, which were sweet to me. 

I am quite feeble yet. Have not 
been well of late. 

Yours in hope, 
J. R. JONES, 
Pilot Mountain, N. C. 



The Letter. 

Dear Bro. Jones: 

Your letter and poetry received 
today. We were glad to hear from 
you again. Ashamed that we had 
not written you sooner. Hope you 
will improve and feel much better 
as the weather gets warmer. We 
are about as usual. Mrs. Neal still 
is in bad health and suffers right 
much at times. Sister Belle Ben- 
ton is in bad shape. Sometimes 
they think she is dying, then she 
will get a little better again. We 
have good preaching at our Church. 
Bro. King comes each month. Bro. 
Trent and Bro. O'Brien preached 
for us last Saturday night. Bro. 
Combs stays right feeble — has not 
been able to go to meeting for sev- 
eral months. 

We miss you at church. Wish 
you could attend as you used to do. 

We are sending you one dollar 
to use as you wish. May the Lord 
bless and keep you is our desire. 

Give our regards to Bro. and Sis- 
ter Key. 

Your in hope, 
L E. Neal and Wife. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



THE LOVE OF JESUS. 

; Elder O. J. Denny, 
j Dear Brother : 

' Just a few words to the redeem- 



ed of God. I hope I love you all 
with the love of Jesus, and I hope to 
meet all the redeemed with Jesus, 
where we will never part. 

There will be no trials, no trou- 
bles, no death to separate us from 
our loved ones. All will praise his 
holy name, from whom all blessings 
flow. 

If our names are written in the 
Lamb's book of life, Jesus will 
never leave nor forsake us. He 
will lead us in the narrow and strait 
way. 

No one knows Jesus except those 
born of the spirit of God. 

Oh, I feel so sinful, and know I 
can't pray a prayer without dear 
Jesus to make intercession for me. 
For Jesus is all to his redeemed. He 
loved them with an everlasting love. 
His redeemed will live with him, in 
glory, around the throne of God. 

There will be no sin nor sorrow 
there. All will be joy, and peace 
and love forever. 

Oh I don't see why some want to 
depart from the good old way. 

It seems to me we have too much 
pride in our churches. We 
hardly seem like a separate people 
and separate people can't mix and 
mingle with worldly things and be a 
separate people. 

Oh, dear Jesus, keep me humble. 
Keep me poor in spirit. 

Bless the dear Lord, for he has 
all power on earth and in heaven. 
His grace is sufficient for his re- 
deemed. 

Jesus is all my trust. It does not 
seem I can ever get humble enough. 
I hope the time will come when I'll 
be free from sin with my loved 
ones, at home with Jesus. 

Your sister, 
Mrs. A. W. Simmons, 

Hardy, Va, 



204 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Zion's Landmark 



"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

Elder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 
Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. No. 13 



Entered at the postoffic* at Wilion 
as second clas« matter 



WILSON, N. C. May 15, 1931 



UNITY OF THE SPIRIT. 

"God is a Spirit and seeketh such 
to worship Him as doth worship in 
Spirit and Truth." 

Unity means agreement. Has 
there been, is there now, or will 
there ever be disagreement between 
God the Father, the Son and Holy 
Ghost? We think not. And, if not, 
the Trinity has ever been, now is 
an*d will ever be in unity in purpose, 
in administration and in accom- 
plishment. 

A house divided against itself 
cannot stand; therefore; we dare 
not question the unity of God, of 
Christ and of the Holy Spirit. 

We read. "And it is the Spirit 
that beareth witness, because the 
Spirit is truth." Always truth. "For 
there are three that bear record in 
Heaven, the Father, the Word, 



(Christ) and the Holy Ghost, (the 
Spirit of God made manifest among 
men.) 

"And these three agree in one." 
Are a unit, therefore there is no dis- 
agreement. 

"And there are three that bear 
witness in earth, the Spirit, the 
water and the blood; and these 
three agree in one." 1st. John 5th. 
chapter. 

The three witness which agree in 
one are all from Heaven. 1st. the 
Spirit, the Holy Ghost, the Com- 
forter which Jesus spake of when 
he said, "I will pray the Father, and 
He shall give you another comfort- 
er, that he may abide with you for- 
ever." Even the Spirit of Truth; 
whom the world cannot receive, be- 
cause it seeth him not, neither 
knoweth him ; but ye know him ; for 
he dwelleth with you, and shall be 
in you. I will not leave you com- 
fortless; I will come to you. Yet a 
little while the world seeth me no 
more; but ye see me; because I live, 
ye shall live also." St. John 
14:16-19. Surely this is sufficient 
proof that the first witness is of 
God and cometh from God, where 
there is that unity described above. 

The second witness in earth, The 
Water. Water, a fluid necessary 
to natural life. We cannot live 
long without water. So in Spirit- 
ual life, "Let him that is athirst 
come and take of the water of life 
freely." Rev. 22:17. Sometimes it 
is a problem for the thirsty to find 
water, since, at times, the springs 
and streamlets become dry. How 
earnest the search for natural water 
when one is thirsty. 

What of the thirst for the spirit- 
ual water? The streams of spiri- 
ual drink never run dry. David 
said, "he leadeth me beside the still 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



205 



waters." "Ho every one that 
thirsteth, come ye to the waters, 
and he that hath no money; come 
ye, buy, and eat; yea, come buy 
wine and milk without money and 
without price." 

Is there a refuge in earth for the 
thirsty and hungry soul? We read 
"God is our refuge and strength, 
(our only refuge and all our 
strength) . Without Him we can 
do nothing. "A very present help 
in trouble." "There is a river, the 
streams whereof shall make glad 
the City of God." "God is in the 
midst of her, she shall not be moved. 
God shall help her and that right 
early. The Lord of Hosts is with us; 
the God of Jacob is our refuge." 
Psalms 46 Chap. What a wonderful 
witness we have in the spiritual 
water, or living water, that flows 
from beneath the throne of God and 
the Lamb, and we are taught that 
every living thing it touches is made 
alive, or, being already a living 
thing, is made lively, or refreshed. 

No wonder we read, "My doc- 
trine shall distil as the dew, as the 
small rain upon the mown grass." 
This living water refreshes, com- 
forts, strengthens, makes alive or 
makes lively living recipients of its 
blessed refreshings. 

The third Witness bearing wit- 
ness in earth. In what earth? Even 
in these earthly vessels of mercy, in 
such vessels, or unto such vessels of 
mercy in all the earth. Is there an 
exception? We think not. All 
true hungry, and thirsty souls shall 
be filled. What of the cost? It is 
without money and without price. 

Does this living water supply all 
the earth, or all the born of earth? 
We read of the great confusion that 
cometh from sin. "For, behold the 



Lord of hosts, doth take away from 
Jerusalem, and from Judah the 
stay and the staff, the whole stay of 
bread and the whole stay of water. 
Isaiah 3:1. 

What a thirsty state cometh to 
those who seek water in legal ser- 
vices, where grace is not. In this 
state it was said. "For Jerusalem is 
ruined, and Judah is fallen; because 
their tongues and their doings are 
against the Lord, to provoke the 
eyes of His glory." Isaiah 3-8. 

Notwithstanding the backsliding, 
and sorrows that befell the Israel- 
ites we read. "For thus saith the 
Lord, I will send peace to her like 
a river, and the glory of the Gen- 
tiles like a flowing stream." Isaiah 
66:12. 

Enough perhaps about the sec- 
ond witness. What of the third, 
the Blood. It is in agreement with 
the first and the second witnesses, 
the Spirit and the Water. All are 
of God, and all in agreement, all 
testifying of the Blood of the Lord 
Jesus Christ, the only sinless blood 
ever shed for sin, and by its cleans- 
ing power, and by the washing of 
regeneration we have, fully accom- 
plished, the promise made in the 
prophetic age, that; "Though your 
sins be as scarlet they shall be as 
white as wool, though they be red 
like crimson, they shall be white 
as snow." Isaiah 1:18. 

All this proves the unity of the 
three-one God. A unit in being, in 
power, in purpose, in love, in ser- 
vice to the beloved people of God, 
and it also proves the unity of the 
three witness sent from God, a one- 
ness in the conviction, conversion, 
preservation, resurrection, and glor- 
ification of the whole family of God 
of every nation, kindred, tongue 
and people, who are the blessed re- 



206 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



cipients of the purchase of His 
blood and the travail of His soul. 

This record, securely kept in 
Heaven, cannot be changed or add- 
ed to or taken from ; but we are not 
left in doubt as to its contents for 
we read, "And this is the record, 
that God hath given to us eternal 
life, and this life is in His S ' 
Therefore; He that hath the Son 
hath life and he that hath not the 
Son hath not life." 

In h')pe 
O. J. DENNY. 



AN ANNOUNCEMENT 

The editor and publishers of 
Zion's Landmark have secured the 
consent of Elder Joel E. Marshall of 
Meadows of Dan, Va., to become an 
associate editor of the Landmark. 

Elder Marshall succeeded Elder 
P. G. Lester, deceased, as modera- 
tor of the New River Association, a 
body of around two thousand mem- 
bers with some 28 or more minis- 
ters. 

Elder Marshall is a man of high 
standing in his country, and a good 
preacher. He does not promise to 
write frequently; but as often and 
as well as circumstances may per- 
mit. 

To those who know Elder Mar- 
shall, personally, there is no need to 
speak of his impediment in speech; 
but to the readers who do not know 
him, will say, he has been afflicted 
with a stammering tongue from 
childhood. Due to this handicap, 
he cannot dictate to others to write 
for him, and due to his rather fee- 
ble condition, cannot write as well 
as in former years. 

When he felt to be called to the 
ministry, he reasoned that is impos- 
sible, for he could not speak as 
others; but, in the providence of 



God, when he is blessed to preach, 
his tongue rings clear in sermon 
and song. He is indeed a comfort 
to many, and a wonder to all who 
know him. 

May the Lord bless his pen as he 
has blessed his speech, that he may, 
by his writings, preach righteous- 
ness to the great congregation. 

We commend what he may have 
to say to the careful consideration 
of the readers of the Landmark. 

O. J. DENNY, Editor. 



A MEMBER FIFTY NINE YEARS. 

Fifty nine years ago D. W. Sim- 
mons baptized me. Since that time 
possibly I have met and heard 
more preachers preach than any 
other man living. (I do not in- 
clude myself among preachers) . 
Two great men I greatly desired to 
meet, but never did, were Sylvester 
Hassell and J. E. W. Henderson. I 
met Gold, Mitchell, Respass, and 
many great men of their day. 

W. F. BRITT, 



ENJOYS WRITINGS OF 
BRETHREN AND SISTERS. 

Mr. John Gold: 

Enclosed please find 'Money Or- 
der for $2.00 which pays for the 
Landmark another year. 

For if I am not deceived I love 
the doctrine it contains. 

I enjoy reading the good writing 
of the brethren and sisters. I do 
not want to miss a copy. 

I have been reading it over for 36 
years. I read it for my mother, 
who was Mary E. Stewart, as long 
as she lived, and I want to as long 
as I live. 

If I live until the 10th of this 
month I wil be 70 years old. 

Yours truly, 
Mrs. J. R. Soyars. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



207 



NANNIE JANE PROCTOR. 

By reauest I will attempt to write some- 
thing about the death of the above name 
mentioned, although I don't feel I can give 
justice as I know my weakness and unfit- 
ness. 

She was my sister in flesh and I have a 
hope was my sister in Christ. 

She was born Sept. 5, 1888, died Mar. 
29, 1931, making her stay on earth 42 
years, six months, 24 days. 

In Dec. 1909, she was married to B. F. 
Proctor, Jr., and to this union were horn 
six children, three boys and three girls. 
One girl preceded her to the grave in in- 
fancy. She leaves to mourn their loss a 
lonely husband, five children, three sis- 
ters, five brothers, together with a host 
of relatives and friends. 

All was done for her that doctors, 
nurses and loving hands could do, but 
none could stay the icy hand of death. 

Funeral services were conducted by her 
pastor, Elder A. B. Denson, and the re- 
mains aid to rest in the Proctor cemetery. 
The pastor spoke very comforting words 
to the bereaved family. I especially 
noticed he said if she was not prepared to 
meet her Lord he was at a loss to know 
where to find one. 

In Oct. 1913 she united with the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church at Pleasant Hill and 
remained there in full fellowship until 
her death. 

Sister was always faithful in many 
ways, faithful to her church, faithful to 
her family, faithful in sickness, faithful in 
many many other ways, and faithfulness 
becometh the household of God. 

I have received several comforting let- 
ters from her, though we lived only two 
miles apart, and so many times I have lis- 
tened to comforting words from her lips. 
"We were raised as playmates b'eing about 
four years difference in our age and sister 
how I will miss you I can't express but I 
should not wish you back for I feel so sure 
you are sweetly resting. So sleep on, dear 
sister. I hope to meet you where parting 
is no more. Her ways were ways of pleas- 
antness and all her paths were paths of 
peace, never murmuring or complaining of 
her lot, and while lying on her dying bed 
with burning fever and breath seemed so 
short, the chilling hands of death crept 
over her body and a smile covered her 
face and seemed to tell me that sister had 
bid farewell to every fear and wiped her 
weeping eyes. 

There was something above the ordi- 
nary in sister. I don't think a nobler 
hfart could beat within a human breast 
She did not shudder or recall a hardship 
in life but died gloriously like a Christian, 
thinking not of earthly honors but only of 
her God and praying that God might guide 
her husband and watch over her children. 



You could readily judge sister's char- 
acter and number of friends, by the 

number of flowers on her grave and num- 
ber of folks that attended her funeral. 

To her dear husband who doubtless 
misses her presence so much as she was 
his constant companion at all times, I 
would say, she has gone on before and we 
. must soon follow, and grieve not as for 
one for whom you have no hope. To the be- 
reaved children whose hearts seemed 
crushed, you should have no regret only 
the separation. May the Lord bless you 
all and your last days may be your best 
days. 

Yes, we loved her but God loved her 
best, and he ha^s sweetly called her to the 
shining shore above to be forever at rest. 
She is gone but not fogotten, nor shall she 
ever be, as long as breath is in a mortal 
like me. 

The half hasn't been said about sister, 
nor never will be by a poor mortal like me. 
I would if I could and the Lord guide 
me to write more but space forbids. 

Written by her brother, 
Mark D. Calhoun. 



THOMAS H. OAKBS 

It is with a sad heart that I attempt to 
write the obituary of my dear father 
Thomas H. Oakes. He was the son of 
John B. and Elizabeth Oakes, was born 
Feb. 13 ,1843, died Dec. 27th, 1930, mak- 
ing his stay on earth nearly 88 years. 
Papa was a Confdeerate veteran, served 
through the entire Civil War, was wound- 
ed eight times. Papa said he did not 
feel very well and had shortness of breath 
and we had the doctor to come to see him. 
Doctor said it was his kidneys and heart, 
and his age made it very difficult to give 
him medicine that would do any good. The 
next night he had a stroke of paralysis in 
the right side and never had any more use 
of his right hand and right foot. 

I fed him from a spoon two weeks. He 
could hardly swallow. One morning he 
said to me, I am almost gone, I can hardly 
get my breath. But he never would say 
that he was sick or that anything hurt 
him. I would ask him what hurts you. 
He would say, nothing. 

He never knew many of his friends that 
came to see him during his sickness. And 
he never called any one but my husband 
and me. We all did everything we could 
for him but none can stay that icy hand 
of death. He was very restless and did 
not sleep much. Papa smiled when I told 
him it was Xmas day, but oh! what a sad 
Xmas it was for me. It was the second 
day of Xmas that we saw the end was 
near. He could not swallow his medicine 
or eat anything, and he slowly sank, and 
Saturday night, Dec. 27, 1930, at 7 o'clock 
he passed away without a struggle. Oh, 
it was so hard to give up one so precious. 



208 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



He had been with me so long and was so 
kind and patient. 

He was laid to rest beside his wife in 
the family cemetery on Monday afternoon. 
Elder W. R. Dodd, his pastor, and Elder 
Jim Stigall conducted the services at my 
home and although the weather was cold 
and snow and slush on the ground, it was 
a large crowd for papa had many friends. 

He had lived with me nearly five years 
since mama died. I always watched after 
him very close and stayed in the house and 
on the porch most all the time for the 
last year he got several falls last Septem- 
ber, but did not get hurt. 

Papa said he was ready to go any 
time, and was only waiting for the Lord 
to call him and he would be glad. He 
could not hear but very little, but the last 
few days he lived he got so he could hear 
better. Papa and mama both joined the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Strawberry, 
April 3rd, 1875 and were baptized the 
first Sunday in May by Elder W. S. Mc- 
Dowell. 

He was elected deacon June 1st, 1895 
and served as long as he was able. He 
fought a good fight and kept the faith. 

Papa had been a subscriber to the Land- 
mark about fifty seven years. He would 
read every day in the Landmark and 
Bible. He said it was like hearing preach- 
ing. He had not been able to go to 
church for a long time. He was a good 
husband and father and the most honest 
man in the world. 

No one on earth knows how much I 
miss him, it seems so lonesome now when 
all the others are ou tat work and I am 
alone at the house. I believe papa is at 
rest for if a clean life was ever lived he 
was one that lived it. 

He leaves to mourn their loss three 
children, Mrs. R. Y. Blair, Danville, Va. R. 
7, Elder E. C. Oakes, Semora, N. C, and 
Mrs. C. E. Parsons, Dry Pork, Va., R. 3. 
One daughter, Mrs. Gilla A. Hines, died 
about twenty years ago. He also leaves a 
number of grand children and great grand- 
children. The pall bearers and flower 
bearers, were his grandsons that loved him 
so well. 

I hope to meet dear papa in a better 
land, where sorrow is not known. 
Written by his daughter, 

Mrs. C. E. Parsons. 



THE EASTERN UNION. 

The Eastern Union is to be held with 
the church at Pungo to commence on Sat- 



urday before the 5th Sunday in May. An 
invitation is extended to all lovers of 
truth to visit this union, especially minis- 
ters in gospel order. 

A. W. AMBROSE, Clerk. 

Creswell, N. C. 



UNION MEETING AT CLEMENT 

The next session of the Angier Union 
is appointed to be held with the Church at 
Clement, Johnson County, Saturday and 
fifth Sunday in May, 1931. Elder T. F. 
Adams is chosen to preach he introduc- 
tory sermon and Elder E. C. Jones is alter- 
nate. 

Clement Cburch is located about four 
miles northwest of Four Oaks, N. C. 

All lovers of Truth are invited to meet 
with us, especially the ministering 
brethren. 

W. F. YOUNG, Union Clerk, 

Angier, N. C. 



THE BLACK CREEK UNION. 

The next session of The Black Creek 
Union will be held (the Lord willing) with 
the church at Mill Branch, Nash County, 
N. C, about three miles north of Sharps- 
burg, the 5th Sunday and Saturday before 
in May. Sharp.sburg is on No. 40 High- 
way between Elm City and Rocky Mount. 
Visitors will be met at Sharpsburg. All 
lovers of truth and good order are invited 
to attend. A special invitation is extend- 
ed to ministers. 

ISAAC A. LAMM, Union Clerk. 



LOWER COUNTRY LINE UNION. 

The Lower Country Line Union will be 
held the Lord willing, with the church at 
Surl, Pei-.«on County, Saturday and fifth 
Sunday in May, 1931. 

Surl is located about six miles southeast 
of Roxboro, N. C. ,on the hard surface 
road leading from Roxboro, N. C, to Ox- 
ford, N. C. 

All lovers of the truth are invited to 
meet with us, especially the ministering 
brethren. 

A. P. CLAYTON, Union Clerk, 
Roxboro, N. C. 



MILL BRANCH UNION 

The Mill Branch Union is to convene 
with the church at PeeDee Saturday and 
5th Sunday in May. Orderly Baptists are 
invited. 

M. MEARES. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOO^ 7 7APTIST 

VOL. LXIV. JUNE 1, 1931 14 

GBHAZI PUNISHED FOR HIS AVARICE. Jo 

"But Gehazi, the servant of Elislia the man of God, said, Behold my 
master hath spared Naaman this Syrian, in not receiving at his hands 
that which he brought: but, as the Lord liveth, I will run after him, and 
take somewhat of him. 

So Gehazi followed after Naaman and when Naaman saw him running 
after him he lighted down from the chariot and said. Is all well? And 
he said, all is well, my master has sent me saying, behold even now there 
be come to me from Mt. Ephraim two young men of the sons of the 
prophets; give them I pray thee, a talent of silver and two changes o£ 
garments. 

And Naaman said, be content, take two talents. And he urged him, 
and bound two talents of silver in two bags, with two changes of gar- 
ments, and laid them upon two of his servants; and they bare them be- 
fore him. 

And when he came to the tower, he took them from their hands, and 
oestowed them in the house: and he let the men go, and they departed. 
But he went in and stood before his master. And Elisha said unto him. 
Whence comest Thou, Gehazi? And he said. Thy servant went no 
whither. 

And he said unto him, Went not mine heart with thee, when the man 
turned again from the chariot to meet thee? Is it a time to receive 
money, and to receive garments, and olive-yards, and vineyards, and 
sheep, and oxen, and men servants, and maid servants? 

The leprosy therefore of Naaman shall cleave unto thee, and unto thy 
seed forever. And he went out from his presence, a leper as white as 
snow. — 2 Kings 5:20-27. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 

i<:LDER JOEL E. MARSHAL Meadows of Dan, Va. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiulied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



©evotet) to the Cause of Sesus Cbdst 




THEIR GOLDEN WEDDING DAY 

Dade City, Fla., May 20, 1931. 

Dear Friend Gold: — I am enclos- 
ing some bits of history, as given 
and deduced by my son, Les- 
ter Gold, assistant manager of the 
Times Union, Jacksonville, Fla. He 
will have it published in that pa- 
per and other papers, together with 
our picture. 



I, am sending you the article to 
read, not for you to publish in 
Zion's Landmark, as it might not 
be proper matter for a religious pa- 
per. 

We have received W'Ord from 
tf;V'ends and 'brethren from many 
parts of the state, that they were 
coming to our home to celebrate 
with us on the 12th. of June. It is 



210 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



a time of happiness that is not at- 
tained by many, and I want to 
Lhank our God that He has bless- 
ed us to live in reasonable health 
and comfort, at least to the near 
aj. preach of our fiftieth wedding 
anniversary in sweet union. I am 
frank to confess, I love and esteem 
my wife more than I did in the long 
ago ; for now I know her worth, 
and what she has been to me. I 
cannot say as some have said that 
there had never been a cross word 
l;!_tween them and their com- 
panion. Some one, in describing 
the state of a contented and 
happy union of husband and wife, 
];ronounced it the "status of antag- 
onistic cooperation," self-assertions, 
when properly considered, lead to 
more self-respect for each other. 
My wife has ever had more love 
and respect for me, than has the 
wife of a henpecked husband ; and, 
c-o have I esteemed her as a com- 
panion and help-meet, and not a 
floor mat. Thus we have ever main- 
tained honor and respect for each 
uther. 

Mr. Gold, 1 am enclosing a cut 
of our pictures if you feel disposed 
to insert them in Zion's Landmark. 

Yours in the mercy of God, 
M. L. GILBERT. 
Dade City, Fla, May 20, 1931. 
Remarks 

While Elder Gilbert did not in- 
tend for us to publish the letter, 
personal to us it was all so good 
that we are passing it on to you, 
tor the words of love and esteem 
for his wife, and the general evi- 
dence of love and affection exist- 
ing between these twain are so 
fine, and which time has proven 
are as endur'ng and firm as the 



everlasting hills, we believe, their 
influence and example will prove 
of value to all who are so fortun- 
ate as to read the account of the 
wedding and feel the spirit of 
this event, so happy and joyous in 
their lives. 

Again we are publishing the en- 
t re account as prepared by his son 
for the Times Union, the proud son 
of a father and mother of whom he 
may well love, adore and esteem. 

So we are passing it all to the 
Piimitive .Biaptist family which 
f'houkl be a true family, the church 
01 God, one in unity, love and fel- 
lov.ship, under Christ the head of 
the church, and we are holding 
nothing back, and we believe Eld- 
er Gilbert and his good wife will 
forgive us for telling it to all, for 
every reader of the Landmark will 
he with them in spirit if not in the 
flesh and wish for them all the 
joy and happiness this life can 
give their remaining days, and 
when God calls them to come home 
to be with Him, their entire fam- 
ily will all be reunited, together 
with His church to sing His praises 
ever more. — J. D. Gold. 
(From the Times Union of June 7, 

Of much interest to hundreds of 
relatives and friends in many sec- 
tions of Florida will be the an- 
nouncement that Elder and Mrs. 
Mozelle L. Gilbert of Dade City, 
Pasco County, Fla., will celebrate 
their Golden Wedding anniversary 
Friday, June 12, 1931. 

Elder and Mrs. Gilbert are the 
parents of nine children, one of 
whom is deceased and they have 
19 grandchildren. 

The children of Elder and Mrs. 
Gilbert are Mrs. Carlos Calvin Ham- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



211 



ilton (Jeimai), Wendell Vernon 
G.lbert, Lester Gold Gilbert, Clif- 
ford Oliver Gilbert, Crome Cacey 
G Ibert, Lois Olive Gilbert, (deceas- 
ed), Mrs. C. H. Smith (Grace), Mrs. 
Rcoert Cameron Miller (Annie), 
and Mrs. Aborn Harris Smith Jr., 
(Ruth). 

All of the children are married 
and all of them live in Florida. 

In 1889 Elder Gilbert was or- 
dained a minister in the Primitive 
Baptist Church, and in the succeed- 
ing years he has continuously and 
faithfully served four to six 
churches a month, traveling many 
thousands of miles. In the services 
of his church he often traveled with 
horse and buggy, and one horse. 
Dexter, which he drove for many 
years was credited by Elder Gil- 
bert's friends With an uncanny 
knowledge of the lanes and roads 
of Southern Florida over which he 
had carried his owner for so many 
years. 

The v'sits to one church alone to- 
taled more than 83,000 miles. Eld- 
er Gilbert has performed 105 
marriage ceremonies and has 
preached many funerals. He help- 
ed to constitute eight churches 
and to ordain seven preacliers. 

He has baptized 417 persons. 

Elder Gilbert has also been very 
active in county affairs, especially 
in the matter of education, which 
has always been a subject of deep 
nterest to him. He has served as 
superintendent of public instruc- 
tion and on the county school board 
and on the board of trustees. 

He has also served on the City 
Council, and for many years in the 
first part of the century he acted 
as curator of the Pasco County Ag- 



ricultural Exhibit in the South 
Florida Fair in Tampa. Elder Gil- 
bert has been a regular contributor 
to several religious publications, 
ard for many years has been asso- 
ciate editor of the Zion's Land- 
mark. 

Of no le.^s importance has been 
the life of his devoted wife, for 
i\irs. Gilbert is known and loved 
ihioughout the State. Her many 
household calls naturally consum- 
ed a great deal of her time, but 
she has always found additional 
time to take an active part in the 
civil and social life of the commun- 
ity where she has lived for so many 
years. 

Elder and Mrs .Gilbert have not 
lived on the farm for a long time, 
but have been identified with the 
life of Dade City. Mrs. Gilbert was 
a charter member of the Woman's 
Club of Dade City, one of the first 
clubs of its nature established in 
Florida, and has held various of- 
fces in the clu'b. She has shone 
brightest in her ow'n home circle 
as wife and mother, and her chil- 
dren have her to thank for what- 
ever measure of success they may 
achieve, for her ambition for them 
has been boundless and her ex- 
rmple a blessed guidance. 

Great joys and great sorrows 
bave vit-iited Elder and Mrs. Gilbert 
in their half century of maiTied life. 
They have seen many changes in 
the country where they came so 
many years ago. It is a bustling, 
well settled countryside now. They 
have weathered the storms togeth- 
er and have shared the joys, and 
on their Golden Wedding anniver- 
sary the line "Well done" seems 
singularly appropriate to apply to 
their union. 



212 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



A .sketch of life history of this 
estimable man and his wife reads 
like a pleasing tale. 

Mozelle L. Gilbert was the son 
'of Mr. and Mrs. Washington Mar- 
ion Gilbert, of Graves County, Ky., 
and grew up in the aftermath of the 
War Between the States in a coun- 
try which was torn 'by dissension. 
His family was in sympathy with 
the Confederacy, and just a few 
miles away lived the family of his 
, oyhood sweetheart, Gency Lundy 
Redwine, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Jacob Redwine, who were just 
as sympathetic to the Union Cause. 

This was not to prove a barrier 
however, to the growing love of 
the two young people. Together 
'thoy attended iClinton College in 
Clinton, Ky., where he studied for 
the law, and she prepared herself 
for school teaching, about the only 
pi^ofession ap0n to g^jirls |of that 
day. When they had finished their 
courses, they found that they loved 
each other too much to part and 
just 50 years ago, Mozelle L. Gil- 
bert and Gency Lundy Redwine 
were married in Graves County, 
Ky., and with high hopes and little 
capital embarked on a long, ardu- 
ous, but happy married life. She 
was 20, and he was 23. 

His health was poor and they 
courageously decided to try their 
fortunes in the State of Florida, 
about which they knew very little, 
but of which they had heard won- 
derful tales. It was reputed to be 
truly a land of milk and honey 
with a bland, soft climate where he 
could regain his strength and the 
health which he had jeopardized in 
the cold winters of his native State. 

After considerable correspond- 



ence they had secured some land on 
which they planned to have an 
orange grove, a dream to their eyes 
accustomed to the apple and pear 
orchards of the Middle West. And 
so, on that long ago June 12, 1881, 
they were married and tookpassage 
on a side-wheeler down the Missis- 
^•ppi River. What a romantic hon- 
eymoon that was, past the historic 
river towns just recovering from 
the blight of the War Between the 
States, to the quaint old city of 
New Orleans, where they boarded 
another steamship which was to 
carry them to their new home. 

This proved to be a perilous stage 
of the journey, for the Summer 
squalls were raging on the Gulf of 
Mexico and the ship was blown from 
her course, delaying their arrival 
several days at Cedar Key. The lit- 
tle bride was very ill, and Florida 
seemed a haven indeed to her when 
they finally were landed at Hud- 
son, in what is now Pasco County. 

After leaving the ship and board- 
ing a small schooner they continued 
150 miles further. 

At that time Hudson was a regu- 
lar port of call. Tampa being only 
? village in 1881. Tom Hudson took 
them from there through a prac- 
tically virgin country to their new 
home about 30 miles away. A cart 
to which two oxen were yoked was 
their conveyance. 

And now they began the task of 
clearing the land for their grove 
and building a little log house, their 
I'iist home. The site for this home 
v.^as on Long Prairie, and on the 
shore of a beautiful little lake, 
teeming with fish, which came to 
be known as Gilbert's Lake. 

The first few years were very dif- 
ficult. The country was strange, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



213 



neighbors were scarce, and every- 
thing was different to the newcom- 
ers. They worked valiantly, glean- 
ing what information they could 
from the kind settlers who had 
come before them,, and the open 
air life accomplished one wonder- 
ful thing for them, for Mr. Gilbert's 
health improved rapidly, and they 
were both robust and strong with 
the new land. 

A little red-haired daughter came 
that second year to brighten their 
lives, but an unbearable nostalgia 
for the old home was ever present 
and after about three years they 
decided to go back to Kentucky, 
and establish their home there 
again. 

They lived in Kentucky a few 
months, during which time the 
first son was born, but they remem- 
bered the little log cabin in Flor- 
ida, and their orange trees, and 
they found that distance had dim- 
med the remem'brance of the hard- 
ships they had endured and had 
left only a longing for their Sou- 
thern home. 

And so they returned, to grapple 
again with the problems but this 
tim^e strong in their determination 
to make a go of it. Pasco County, 
at that time Hernando County, was 
very sparsely settled. There was a 
little village at Fort Dade, but the 
nearest railroad at that time ex- 
tended into the State only as far 
South as Ocala, and some settler 
made the long trip with buggy and 
horse for the mail about once a 
week. 

The Seaboard Air Line railway 
was laid later through the Gilbert 
grove, and while at this date there 
was no danger from the Indians, 
tramps on the new railroad, and 



outlawed characters prevalent in an 
unsettled country, made life on an 
out-of-the-way farm an adventure 
in courage. 

After several years Elder Gil- 
bert's parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. M. 
Gilbert came and established a 
home nearby, bringing with them 
his only sister, who is now Mrs. 
R. L. Batchelor of Dade City. 

Fortune seemed to smile on the 
pioneers, until the freeze of 1896 
gave them a heart-breaking set- 
back. Their grove, along with the 
groves of all their neighbors, was 
killed in this catastrophe, which is 
sail remembered in the hearts of 
those who lived here at that time. 
Not even the national drama of 
the Spanish-American War seemed 
as close as did this personal loss. 
The American troops made a col- 
orful interlude, though, for the fam- 
ily to watch as they rode on the 
new railroad to Tampa for embar- 
kation to Cuba. 

During the years nine children 
came to bless the Gilbert home, and 
as if this were not enough care and 
responsibility for Elder and Mrs. 
Gilbert, they assumed the care of 
two orphan children for several 
years. Every sacrifice was made to 
keep the growing family going. The 
boys helped with the farm, and in 
the early years in Florida, both Mr. 
and Mrs. Gilbert taught in the lit- 
tle country schools which the set- 
tiers established. 

ExemplSfying thX'ough all their 
days, the things that they believed 
in, Elder and Mrs. Gilbert have so 
lived that their children have in- 
deed risen up and "Called them 
blessed." Through the courage of 
their conviction sthey have proven 
that right living is best, and in the 



214 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



observance of their fiftieth wedding 
anniversary this week, they will 
be surrounded by their family, and 
hundreds of devoted friends. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 
Dear Sir: 

Inclosed you will find a letter, 
written by our dear Sister Keaton, 
to be read in Conference held with 
the Church of Bethlehem, Tyrrell 
County, during our last quarterly 
meeting at that place. Sister Keaton 
is a much loved member of that 
body — each member expressing re- 
gret at her absence — but after hear- 
ing the letter read, we all felt 
that it contained a message from 
one of God's little ones and desired 
to see it in print, hoping that its 
contents may bring joy to others. 

We have Sister Keaton's permis- 
sion to publish same in the Land- 
mark. 

W. R. HINES, 

Wilson, N. C. 



The Letter. 

To the Church at Bethlehem and 
Friends of my childhood, youth and 
middle age, the church of my angel 
father and mother, where I have 
been enabled by divine grace ( as I 
hope) to worship with them and 
other dear fathers and mothers in 
Israel, who have long since passed 
over the river and are basking in 
the sunshine of redeeming love. O, 
sometimes the shadows are so deep 
and so rough seems the path to the 
goal, that I feel like it would be 
sweet to just turn loose of all things 
earthly and join them over there, 
but I want to be submissive to my 
heavenly Father's will and run with 
patience the race set before me, 
ever looking unto Jesus who is the 



Author and Finisher of the Chris- 
tian faith. But the question arises 
deep down in this poor heart of 
mine, how can I look to that dear 
friend when my vision is so dim? 
How can I run, when the road be- 
fore me seems so long and dusty 
and so weary my feet, O! but some- 
thing seems to whisper to the weary 
traveler, "Just ahead is a great 
Rock and in that Rock are great 
clefts, large enough and strong 
enough to shelter every weary trav- 
eler, who seeks refuge there, but 0, 
says the weary one, I think I see the 
shadow of that wonderful rock, but 
behold I am vile, am not fit to be 
numbered with the king's guests, 
and besides like one of old, lame 
on both feet, weak and helpless, 
must lie here by the road-side or the 
gospel pool and wait for the moving 
of the water, just wait and watch 
and pray, ere long our good Samari- 
tan shows himself through the lat- 
tice, or we see him through a glass 
darkly. How great is that dark- 
ness, sometimes like the darkness 
of Egypt, can be felt, but blessed 
thought while we cannot go to Him, 
because of the thick darkness of 
this poor earth of ours, yet He mer- 
cifully and lovingly comes right in 
this tabernacle of clay, the dark- 
ness flees from his presence, the 
son of righteousness arises with 
healing in his wings and ere we 
are aware the heart breaks forth 
with songs of praise and rejoicing 
in the light of the knowledge of the 
glory of God in the face of Jesus 
Christ." 

Yesterday P. M., I asked Bro. 
and Sister Hines to explain why ^ 
could not be with you and thought 
I would not try to write this time, as 
my poor letters always seem to me a 
failure, but somehow my heart and 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



215 



mind has been so full of thought of 
you all, I just couldn't help but 
seize my pen and try to tell you 
some of my exercise of mind, how I 
hope and pray that our dear pastor 
may be overshadowed by divine 
wisdom, thereby enabling him to 
partake of the fruit from the tree of 
life and feed some of God's humble 
poor. I know that he must speak 
to you as individuals, calling you by 
name, as he did Mary of old, to pre- 
pare your heart to receive the word 
as spoken through his undershep- 
herd. May you be blest to enjoy a 
heavenly feast together, thereby 
being strengthened and built up in 
the inner man and to feel when this 
meeting is over that it is good for 
us to be here. Realizing this, I 
know you will consider the great 
sacrifice our pastor and his dear 
companion are making for our spir- 
itual good. 

Husband joins me in warmest 
Christian love to all, asking an in- 
terest in your prayers and that you 
come to see us, I am, I hope. 
Your little sister, 

MRS. W. H. KEATON, 
Wilson, N. C. 



HELP BROTHER STEPHENSON. 

P. D. Gold Publishing Company, 
Wilson, N. C. 

My Dear Brethren and Friends: 

Some kind brother or friend, 
knowing my condition (perhaps) 
sent me the Landmark several 
months ago, marked paid to May 
15. I have not got a dollar to send 
to you now, ibut please do not stop 
the paper. It is possible I may be 
able to pay for it sometime in the 
near future. I am in a bad way just 
now, but somehow I feel that if 
my brethren and friends knew my 



condition they would I donate 
enough to keep me living until I 
can die a natural death. The facts 
aie as follows: About ten years 
^.go reverses came into my life in 
a way that I could not control. I 
did not drink or dissipate in any 
way, but reverses continued to 
come until in the fall of 1929 I said 
to my wife, let us sell all that we 
have and pay our debts. She read- 
ily agreed with me and we did sell 
houses and lands, stock, tools, feed 
stuff, household and kitchen fur- 
niture, at a loss of about $12,000.00, 
out we did pay our debts. Notwith- 
standing I was then 73 years old, 
I got me a job, and was making 
some money and was doing very 
well, but on the 28th. of February 
1930 I fell on my work, under the 
power of a stroke of paralysis. I 
have been either on my bed or a 
chair ever since with no hope that 
I will ever be able to earn another 
penny. Yes I realize that I am in 
the home of the incurable. If the 
churches to whom I have preached 
could find it in their hearts to do- 
nate to me each month a very small 
amount it might prove a blessing to 
all of us. 

My brethren, neighbors and 
friends have been exceedingly kind 
to us, but it is so very burdensome 
on so few. If any brother or sister 
or friend should find it in your 
heart to donate any little to me I 
hope to be able to receive it as 
from the Lord. There are many 
things that I would like to write to 
all of you, but I can not afford to 
ask for the space in the dear old 
Landmark. However, I will say, 
that if any brother, sister or friend 
v.'ould like to hear personally from 



216 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



me I will be glad to answer any 
letter that 1 may receive. 

Most lovingly yours, 

Elder W. J. STEPHENSON. 
Coats, N. C. , 

I am sending my check for $5.00 
and we shall fee pleased to ac- 
knowledge any contributions 
through the Landmark, Pardon me 
for saying so and perhaps I have 
no right to say so, but I have al- 
Vv ays felt that if a minister gives his 
time and attention to the church in 
spiritual matters the members of 
the church who have been so bless- 
ed should also remember their pas- 
tor in material matters, for every 
man must have a living or starve. 

I know that Elder Stephenson 
has done the best he could. He has 
served his churches on Sundays 
and Saturdays and labored with his 
hands to make a living. He has sold 
all he had to pay his debts which is 
honorable. 

If the Lord has afflicted him in 
body and in store, it is possible He 
did it to try his faith which has not 
wavered (as did Job) through all 
of his trials, and the members of 
<he church also to see whether they 
v/ould be loyal to their pastor and 
to God who giveth us all we have, 
for we are simply trustees of His 
providence to use what He has giv- 
en us to help others in their neces- 
sity. Remember what the Saviour 
said about a cup of cold r/ater in 
My name. 

J. D. GOLD. 



LET'S HELP HER. 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 
Wilson, N. C. 
Dear friend : 

While wondering and worrying 
what to do, and who to ask help 



from, it was spoken in my heart, as 
though some one had spoken, "Ap- 
peal to your own people," and the 
dear Old Baptists were in my view. 
Now I hope the Primitive Baptists 
are my people. I have had a home 
with them since May 1918, and hope 
to live with them as long as I live. 

Now this is my condition. My 
husband is an invalid and we have 
four small children, and we are de- 
pendent on charity part of the 
time for something to eat and wear. 
We have our little home, but owe 
$100 on it, and unless we can get 
help to pay the $100.00 we will 
lose our home. Now, Mr. Gold, if 
you will put just a short notice in 
the dear old Landmark I will great- 
ly appreciate it. If there are any 
who feel like helping me I will 
greatly appreciate any amount. 

Yours truly 
Mrs. C. S. Flynn, 
General Delivery, 
Washington, N. C. 



I will be one of 20 to give $5.00 
to pay the mortgage off her home. 

J. D. GOLD. 



PERILOUS TIMES IN THE 
LATTER DAYS. 

This know also, that in the 
latter days perilous times shall 
come. For men shall be lovers of 
their own selves, covetous, boast- 
ers, proud, blasphemous, disobe- 
dient to parents, unthankful, un- 
holy, without natural affections, 
truce breakers, false accusers, in- 
continent, fierce, despisers of those 
that are good etc. 2nd. Tim. 1-4. 

The apostle was able to by the 
spirit of prophecy to see these per- 
ilous times in the distant future. 
These times have come just as he 
said, and the course of their com- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



217 



ing is not because of any fault in 
the works of the God of nature, 
but because of the wickedness of 
men. The earth produces crops for 
the sustenance of man and beast 
just as it did when man was young 
on it. The seasons come and go 
w"ith perfect regularity, the clouds 
drop down moisture, and the 'dew 
is distilled on the grasses. There is 
abundance of food, stored in vari- 
ous places as well as cotton and 
other fabrics suitable for clothing, 
and yet there are people enough in 
sight who are hungry and scantily 
clothed to consume the food and 
everything which our leaders please 
to call a surplus if they only could 
get them. The farmers raise great 
crops for which there is no demand 
except at a price that will not 
pay the cost of production, there 
is plenty of money but produce will 
not buy it, and if we send people to 
legislate for us they forget the com- 
mon people and serve the rich in- 
stead, and they call this the land 
of the free and the home of the 
brave. 

We are assured these are the 
last days because the Apostle said 
these perilous times would come in 
the last days, and they have come, 
not because of famine, wars, earth- 
quakes and pestilence, but because 
men should be lovers of themselves, 
etc. The times prophesied of are 
here, the people who are respon- 
sible for such times are here, and 
there is no good reason for expect- 
ing better times, only temporarily, 
for in order to change the times it 
will first be necessary to change 
the people, and nothing short of 
the grace of God can do that. It is 
right for people to love themselves 



enough to safeguard their health, 
to keep their bodies clean and de- 
cent, to inform themselves about 
ihe important things of life, that 
we may be able to teach our chil- 
dren and others, but the greater 
percent of unpleasantness met with 
in dealing with our fellow man is 
caused by an over supply of self 
love, and in our churches the same 
spirit is often manifested, because 
some one wants to rule or dictate to 
others .vhicn always tends cov^ards 
confusion. 

This -'s a great pleasure loving 
age, but earthly pleasures never 
bring happiness, they endure but 
for a moment and then fly away, 
leaving us in a wasted condition 
mentally and financially, but the 
only real pleasure a child of God 
can see is to endeavor to live up to 
dictates of that renewed conscience 
and when they fail to acknowledge 
their faults one to another 
and ask each other's forgiveness. 
This is a great boasting age when 
people glory in the material things 
of life, but boasting is excluded by 
the law of faith, leaving us the im- 
material things to boast of, even 
the love, goodness, holiness, righte- 
ousness and %<-aciousness of our 
great High Priest who still makes 
intercession for us according to the 
will of God. The world has a form 
of godliness but denies its power, 
which power to the child of God 
is the most amazing thing imagin- 
able, how God could save poor 
sinners dead in sin, without God 
and hope in the world, and how He 
can keep, comfort, sustain, lead 
and preserve them while they are 
so prone to sin. The apostle says 
they shall proceed no further, for 



218 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



as James and Jamibres withstood 
Moses so do men of coi^upt minds 
always resist the truth, they could 
not demonstrate a power they did 
not possess. They could not hinder 
God from demonstrating his power 
in Egypt, the Red Sea and in the 
wilderness, they could not hinder 
the children of Israel from going 
forth, the ycould not prevent their 
fioss.ng the Red Sea, nor prevent 
Ciod from feeding and caring for 
them in the wilderness, they could 
not prevent their crossing the Jor- 
dan and entering Canaan their 
natural inheritance given them in 
Abraham before they existed as a 
nation and a type of the heavenly 
inheritance given us in Christ 
Jesus before the world be- 
gan. Israel, compared with the 
great world surrounding it was 
small indeed, and often would have 
been swallowed up, but for the 
protecting :hand of God, iso the 
church is small but great, weak 
but strong, poor but rich, black but 
comely, always bearing in its body 
the mark of the Lord Jesus, who 
searches out and finds all His sheep 
and brings them to the fold ; feed 
them because they are His, they 
were given Him by the Father, He 
then gave His life for them. 

Not one will be lost, but they 
will be saved from the fury of their 
enemies, and from their own self 
and at last be gathered home to 
rest in His loving embrace forever. 

B. S. COWIN. 
Williamston, N. C. 



AN APPEAL FOR HELP. 

Dear readers of the Landmark: 

I never have tried to write any- 
thing for the dear paper, but I do 



enjoy reading the good messages it 
contains. 

I have been in bad health for 
nearly five years. Sometimes I 
don't go anywhere by myself for 
weeks at a time for I get down and 
have to be brought home. I have 
been in the hospital three times. 
The doctors now say I have brain 
trouble and want me to go to Rich- 
mond, Va., to a brain specialist. I 
have not been able to work any at 
all since last November. We have 
five in the family and my wife is 
also not able to do anything. I am 
not financially able to go to Rich- 
mond, but I am trying to raise the 
money to go on. If any of the dear 
readers of Landmark feel like they 
would like to help me some to pay 
for this I assure you it will be high- 
ly appreciated. You can just send 
it to me, Noah P. Spangler, Cascade, 
Va., Route 2, or send it to my father. 
Elder J. F. Spangler, same address, 
for I am staying with him. Any 
amount will be greatly appreciated. 
I feel that the Lord has been good 
to me in my afflictions. And I 
hope if it can be according to His 
will that I can go to Richmond and 
be restored to health and usefulness 
to my family. If it can be so all 
honor and glory will belong to God. 
If not I want to be submissive to His 
will, for He doeth all things well. I 
have a little hope when I am called 
away from this world of sorrow and 
affliction that I will be blessed to 
meet with the saints of God that 
have gone on before in that world 
where there is no sorrow, no sick- 
ness and no sad farewells, to sing 
praises around the throne of God. 

A sinner saved by grace if saved 
at all, 

Noah P. Spangler, 
Cascade, Va., Route No. 2. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



219 



Zion's Landmark 



"Remove not the ancient Landmar^^ 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
Elder M. L. Gilbert — Dade City, 

FU. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. No. 14 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C. JUNE 1, 1931 



ST. JOHN 3:16 AND REV. 22:17. 

A friend R. P. Garner of New- 
port, N. C., requests my views on 
the above scriptures, saying among 
other things "I can't help believing 
the doctrine preached by the Primi- 
tive Baptists; but it does seem like 
some scriptures contradict other 
parts of the Bible." 

All scriptures were given by the 
inspiration of God and are profit- 
able for doctrine, for correction and 
for reproof, and are not in contra- 
diction one against the other, if, and 
when, understood in the light of the 
inspired writers. Many scriptures 
have to be read or preached in the 
light of other scriptures, and none 
of us are wise enough in our own 
natural wisdom to properly inter- 
pret scriptures unless we are taught 
of the same spirit that taught the 
scriptural writers. 



In the 3d. chapter of St. John we 
have an account of the learned 
ruler among the Jews, Nicodemus, 
a scribe, or interpreter of the law, 
coming to Jesus by night, saying un- 
to him, 'Rabbi, we know thou art 
a teacher sent from God, and etc." 
Jesus answered him and said unto 
him, "I say unto thee, except a man 
be born again, he cannot see the 
kingdom of God. 

Nicodemus (a ruler of the Jews, 
and a wise man, in so far as famil- 
iarity with the teachings of the law 
was concerned) could not under- 
stand how this could be true, for 
said he, "How can a man be born 
again when he is old?" Jesus said, 
"That which is born of the flesh is 
flesh ; and that which is born of the 
spirit is spirit. Marvel not that I 
said unto thee, ye must be born 
again." 

Jesus then said, as touching the 
manner of this birth of the Spirit, 
"The wind bloweth where it listeth, 
and thou hearest the sound there- 
of; but canst not tell whence it 
Cometh, and whither it goeth; so is 
every one that is born of the Spirit." 

Shall we call this Baptist doc- 
trine? It is Bible doctrine, and 
embraces all the spiritually born of 
God. Nicodemus being a Jew, a 
ruler among them and a strict Phar- 
isee, believed that the Church of 
God was limited to the Jews or 
chosen people of God, the Israelites, 
land hence all others were of the 
world, or outside the pale of the 
lawful worshippers shrine. 

We often hear ministers speak of 
even now believe that unless one 
even now beileve that unless one 
becomes a member of some organ- 
ized church (and those holding 
such views as a rule think it makes 
little or no difference as to what 



220 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



they believe or do, so they are mem- 
bers of some church, all is well 
with the soul) but if not all is lost, 
if death finds them out of the 
Church. 

Now we come to the text. Jesus 
said, "And as Moses lifted up the 
serpent in the wilderness, (not in 
the church) even so much the Son 
of Man be lifted up ; that whoso- 
ever believeth in Him should not 
perish; but have everlasting life." 
(Now for the reason) "For God so 
loved the world, (or loved the world 
so much) that He gave His only be- 
gotten Son, (as the only sacrifice 
for sin) that whosoever believeth 
in him should not perish, but have 
everlasting life." In other words, 
Jesus came not to call the righteous, 
(the self righteous) but came to 
call sinners to repentance, and His 
coming into the world was not to 
save the Jews, alone; but Gentiles 
also, the middle wall of partition be- 
tween Jew and Gentile, being thus 
Taroken down; therefore believers 
in Christ in all the world (whether 
they be Jews or Gentiles, rich or 
poor, ignorant or learned, bond or 
free, noble or ignoble, in so far as 
the world recognizes distinctions 
among men) are made poor in 
spirit, earnest seekers after salva- 
tion, regardless of the time, age, lo- 
cation or circumstances and they 
will be taught of the Lord, so per- 
fectly that they will sing the song 
of redemption without a discordant 
note. 

"God so loved the World," Jews 
and Gentiles, that he gave His only 
"begotten Son of God, that whoso- 
ever, in all the world, believeth in 
Him, should not perish. Well, one 
says, they should not perish; but 
may do so unless certain conditions 
are complied with. Let us see 



what Jesus says about this possi- 
bility? In John 10:27-28 we read. 
"I know my sheep. I call them by 
name. They do follow me, and 
etc.," and "My sheep hear my voice 
and I know them, and they follow 
me, and I give unto them eternal 
life; and they shall never perish, 
and none is able to pluck them out 
of my Father's hand." 

We now turn to Rev. 22d. Ch. "I 
am the Alpha and the Omega, the 
beginning and the end, the first 
and the last. I, Jesus have sent 
mine angel to testify unto you these 
things in the churches. I am the 
root and the offspring of David, the 
bright and the morning star. And 
the Spirit, (the Third part of the 
Trinity) and the bride, (the Spirit- 
ually born of God) say, come, and 
let him that heareth say come, 
(only the living hear) and let him 
that is athirst come, (only the living 
thirst and it is only the living that 
doth come to the fountain.) And 
whosoever will, "let him take of the 
water of life freely." Who; but the 
believer, believes there is a foun- 
tain flowing from beneath the 
throne of God and the Lamb, and 
that it flows into the garden of His 
Grace, watering the plants of hi^ 
spiritual kingdom, which have been 
translated from the kingdom of 
darkness (the world) into the 
kingdom of God's dear Son. 

These scriptures are not in con- 
tradiction to the teachings of Jesus. 
Here read the sermon on the Mount. 

"Blessed are they (all of them) 
which do hunger and thirst after 
righteousness ; for they shall be fill- 
ed." Matt. 5:6. 

May the Lord give us understand- 
ing in all things needful, and lead 
us to the ROCK that is HIGHER 
than L O. J. DENNY. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



221 



THE IMPOSTOR AND THE 
HERETIC. 

I have been asked if these are 
similar characters, and when dis- 
covered in the church if they 
should be both disciplined by the 
Church ? 

"An impostor is one who imposes 
upon others by an assumed charac- 
ter or false pretensions." — Wester. 
If such a vile character should im- 
pose upon a church, and pose as 
preacher, he might be entirely or- 
thodox as far as the doctrine and 
order of the church, and preach 
letter preaching with marked abil- 
ity zealously without any love for 
the faith he proclaimed. There 
have been men who never evi- 
denced that they had more than a 
natural religion seemed as intent 
as if they had been spiritually 
taught and called of God to preach 
the gospel. However it is not im- 
possible for some servant of the 
Lord, who had been excluded from 
the church, to impose himself upon 
a church where he is unknown, 
though it is not probable ; for a true 
disciple loves the church too well to 
deceive her. "By mercy and truth 
iniquity is purged; and by the fear 
of the Lord men depart from evil." 
— Prov. 16:6. 

Surely, none but God knoweth 
how far and long an unregenerated, 
self-willed man may contend for the 
principles of grace and act like His 
servant, and be entirely destitute of 
eternal life. So only doth the Lord 
know what heretical doctrines one 
may teach or how remiss in Chris- 
tian duty, and be a child of God. 

When it is discovered that an in- 
postor has crept into the church 
rnnk bv false pretensions, havin?r no 
s-ori■'^tural immunities therein, it is 
the duty of the charch <o r^'^cind 



her act in receiving him, "that he 
might go to his own place." Such 
a person is not a subject of church 
discipline. 

Then there are children of God 
that have imbibed heretical doc- 
trines and who do not obey the 
truth, these should be labored with 
as in Titus,3:10; for, "A man that 
is a heretic after the first and sec- 
ond admonition reject" — that is he 
should be excluded. 

But as there were impostors, call- 
ed false prophets among the Israel- 
ites of old, so there will be, says 
Peter, false teachers in the Chris- 
tian world, who shall privily bring 
in damnable heresies, as do modern- 
ists denying the virgin birth, resur- 
rection and ascensi.^r". of our Jesus 
Christ; and, as Peter said the Lord 
who bought them — not referring to 
Christ's atonement but to God who 
had preserved them through all 
their pernicious ways. So it seems 
that it is God, and not the church, 
that deals with them as He did 
with the Angels that sinned (2 
Peter 2:4.) 

M. L. GILBERT 



DON'T CHARGE IT UP TO THE 
EDITORS. 

Whenever you see anything 
wrong with the Landmark or any 
article contained therein charge it 
up to the undersigned. 

We should of course send every 
article which is sent us to our sen- 
ior Editor for his inspection and ap- 
proval, but it is impossible, or im- 
practical to do this at all times, for 
the reason that many articles re- 
quire immediate attention, and if 
'^ent to Winston for his perusal they 
would not get back in time to be 
published before the date of their 
occurrence. 



222 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Of course I have a great deal of 
work to do, in connection with the 
conduct of the business, and its 
numerous ramifications, and cannot 
give the personal attention to the 
Landmark that is required to make 
of it the paper it should be. But to 
take the blame from our Editors 
who are willing to peiuse the mat- 
ter and handle it in the right way, 
leaving out such matter in their 
opinion as should not be published, 
we would like to state, that what- 
ever mistakes, inaccuracies, or any 
thing that is imperfect, about the 
Landmark, I am entirely responsible 
therefor. 

JOHN D. GOLD. 



F. N. GARNER 

It has pleased our heavenly father to re- 
move by death our dear brother and 
father, F. N. Garner, the son of David B. 
and Elizabeth Garner, who was born Sept. 
26th 1848, and died Feb. 19th., 1931, 
making his stay on earth 8 2 years, 4 
months and 23 days. He was first mar- 
ried Nov. 27th, 1872, to Laura A. Hill. 
Two children were born to them, one dy- 
ing in infancy. After the death of his 
first wife he was married to Mrs. Rebecca 
Mann, April 27th, 1878. To them were 
born 6 children, 3 boys and 3 girls. After 
the death of his last wife he made his 
home with his youngest son until he be- 
came afflicted. Then he moved with his 
oldest son, and remained there until his 
death. He united with the Primitive Bap- 
tist Church at Newport, N. C., June 17th, 
189 7, and was baptized by Elder W. "V^j: 
Brinson. He lived a loving and devoted 
member until death. He was badly af- 
flicted for 40 years, but for several years 
he has been confined to the house suffer- 
ing from heart dropsy. He bore his af- 
flictions with patience without murmuring 
or complaining. He leaves one brother, 
7 children, 40 grand children and several 
great grandchildren to mourn his absence, 
together with a host of relatives and 
friends. He was taken with shortness of 
breath and flu we supposed and developed 
pneumonia the day before he died. He 
suffered more than tongue can tell. All 
was done for him that earthly friends and 
doctors could do. But the Lord called 
him home where all is peace and love. He 
so often had desired to depart and be with 
Jesus. 66 2 was one of his favorite hymns. 
The funeral was conducted at the home 



by Elder W. W. Roberts and the writer 
and the remains were taken to the home 
graveyard and tenderly laid by the side of 
his last wife to await the morning of the 
resurrection, when his body will be raised 
and fashioned like the glorious body of 
Jesus. All the corruption will be left in 
the grave, and he will see Jesus and be 
like Him. And while we all loved him, 
Jesus loved him best. And we could not 
wish him back. We desire to bow to thy 
will O God. We feel that his church at 
Newport has lost one of its dear beloved 
members. It is our humble prayer that 
the Lord may continue to bless them, that 
they may live together in peace and love, 
and the Lord may add to the church such 
as He would have to be saved. This is 
the dear old church where I was ordained. 
Brother Garner gave good counsel to his 
church. When we think of never seeing 
him any more in this life it makes us sad. 
But we have a hope of meeting him on 
the sunny banks of sweet deliverance, 
where tliere is no night but eternal day. 
Glorious thought. May God bless you my 
dear children. 

Written by his son-in-law. 

E. A. POLLARD, 
Jacksonville, N. C. 
(Lone Pilgrim please copy. 



NANNIE MAE NEAVTOX 

With a sad .ind heavy heart, I will at- 
tempt to write a few words in memory of 
p dear sister who on May 12 passed from 
this troubleson^e world to a happy home 
with Jesus. Nannie Mae had been in very 
bad heolth for five years or more, never 
having been strong from a child. She had 
sleeping sickness in 1926 which left her 
n nervous wreck, and caused partial p-ira- 
lysis of her right side, blood clotted on 
her brain which at times unbalanced her 
mind. She was carried to several places 
for treatment, all th^it loving relatives, 
kind friends, neighbors and doctors could 
do was done, but it seemed nothing could 
give her any lasting relief. 

In January we got the sad news she 
had taken Lysol. Oh! how our hearts 
ached. We thought for several days she 
would die. But she got over tlvit. but on 
The morning of May 12. she asked her 
husband if there was water enough in the 
pond near her home, to baptise, any one. 
he, never thinking why she asked told 
her there was. Then sending him to a 
nearby store for an orange drink, she got 
out of bed, dressed and went to the pond, 
left her clo-ik on the bank and there a 
I'assing neighbor found her. She was dead 
when removed from the water. 

But we have a precious hope she is as 
safe with Jesus as a little babe. For on 
third Saturday in February. 1928 she pro- 
fessed a hope in Jesus, w.is received in 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



223 



Upper Town Creek Church and baptized 
the next day. 

She has had some very beautiful 
dreams and visions, some she told her 
family, others she only mentioned. But 
she often told me she was very happy 
when she could feel the presence of 
Jesus. 

Just one week before she died she had 
a very beautiful dream, one that I feel 
was sent to her to make her ?;trong enough 
to do what she did, and to comfort her 
grief stricken family. 

She told me the dream and said she 
was ready and willing to go. Sha wished 
Jesus would call her home. She told me 
this on Sunday .and Tuesday she went, 1 
feel sure to Jesus. 

The funeral service was conducted by 
Elder Robert Boswell and was very com- 
forting. Interment was in the Parmer 
cemetery beneath many beautiful flowers. 

She was the daughter of J. T. and Bet- 
sey Williams. She was born July 24, 
1905 .and married to Roy L. Newton on 
February 26, 1922. 

She leaves behind a grief-stricken hus- 
band, four little children, a father and 
mother, four brothers and four sisters, 
and many friends and relatives. 
A precious one from us has gone, 

A voice we loved is still, 
A place is vaoant in our home 

Which never can be filled. 

A mother's heart is troubled, 

A father's heart I's sad, 
We can only say, be comforted 

By the wonderful dream she had. 

Ker husband's heart is breaking. 
Bowed down with deep despair; 

Be brave, be patient, and trust in God, 
And may you meet her There. 

Her little children are motherless. 

No sadder sight to see — 
We pray God's richest blessing on them. 

Wherever they may be. 

Her brothers have lost a dear sister. 
Her sisters have lost a de:ar friend. 

We know it will be hard to live 

Without you, and endure to the end. 

"Jerusalem, My Happy Home", 

That was her favorite song; 
To wish her back in this cold world. 

We know it would be wrong. 

So sleep on dear sister and tike thy rest, 
God called you home He thought it best 

We will not mourn, we will not weep. 
Because we know you sweetly sleep. 

Goodby now dear sister, we bid you fare- 
well. 

We know you are gone, glad tidings to 
tell, 



Although for a while ouj- bodies must part 
Cemented in love, wc are still joined in 
heart. 

Wrilten by her sister, Alice. 



RESOIA TIOXS OF RESPECT 

Whereas it has pleased our Heavenly 
Father to remove from us our beloved 
brother F. N. Garner on February 19th, 
1931, ne it I'esolved: 

1st. That we bow in humble submission 
to Him who doeth all things well. 

2nd. That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the bereaved f-amily, a copy sent 
to the Zions Landmark and the Lone Pil- 
grim, foi' publication an da copy spread 
in our church l)ank. 

Done by order of Conference this the 
14th day of March, 1931. 

Elder W. W. Roberts, Moderator, 
C. Mann, Clerk. 



RESOIA TIOXS OF RP]Sl*Et T 

Whereas it has pleased our Heavenly 
Father to remove from us our beloved 
brother F. E. Mason on March 8th, 1934, 
be it resolved: 

1st. That we bow in humble submission 
to Him who doeth all things well. 

2nd. That a copy be sent to the bereav- 
ed family and a copy sent to Zions Land- 
mark and The Lone Pilgrim for publica- 
tion and a copy spread in our church book. 

Done by orde rof Conference this the 
14th day of March, 19 31. 

Elder W. W. Roberts, Moderator, 
C. Mann, Clerk. 



TO HELP SOMEONE I NABLE TO PAY 
FOR LAXD.M.ARK 

The following have paid for Zion's 
Landmark to be sent to some one unable 
to pay for it: 

$2.00 G. T. House, Stokes, N. C. 

$3.00 J. Lem Satterwhite, Broaderton, 
Fla. 

$2.00 Mary A. Morgan, Drumright, 
Okla. 



>L^RY ELIZA SANFORD 

Mary Eliza Sanford was born in Ran- 
dolph County, N C, Oct. 31, 1855 and died 
in High Point, N. C, March 14, 1931, age 
75 years, two months, and thirteen days. 

She was a daughter of J. H. and Sarah 
Kivett Boroughs. She was first married 
in 1876, to A. G. Curtiss and to this union 
was born one daughter, Ora Ann Curtiss 
McCain. After the death of her first hus- 
band, she was married a second time in 
1889, to Mr. K. Sanford who also preceded 
her in death. She professed a hope in 
Christ in early womanhood and about the 
age of twenty years. She united with the 
Primitive Baptist Church at Mt. Tabor in 
Randolph County. After her marriage to 
Mr. Sanford she moved to Ellerbe, N. C, 
and moved her membership to Suggs Creek 



224 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Church and when Cotton Creek Church 
was organized she moved her membership 
there it being eight or ten miles nearer 
her homfe. 

After the death of her second husband 
she moved to High Point, N. C, near the 
home of her daughter, and for convenience 
moved her membership to High Point 
Primitive Baptist Church. 

She was a faithful, industrious and self 
supporting lady. She was a firm believer 
in the doctrine of salvation by grace and 
the doctrine of predestination and election 
as set forth by the Apostles and prophets 
and defended by such able ministers as 
P. D. Gold, Samuel McMillan and others of 
the Old School Primitive Baptist Church. 

She was very widely known and loved by 
all who knew her; which love was so 
plainly demonstrated by the many friends 
who visited her in her last sickness, and 
which was further shown by the vast 
crowd of people who attended her funeral 
and contributed flowers as a token of their 
love and e.^teem. 

Her body was laid to rest in High Point 
Church Cemetery. 

She often made my home her home 
where she and my wife spent many pleas- 
ant hours; but now we feel that she has a 
perfect home in that Heavenly Mansion 
which is not made with hands but eternal 
and in the heavens. 

She leaves one daughter, eight grand 
children and eight great grandchildren to 
mourn their loss. 

Written by request, 

L. A. WRIGHT. 



NOTICE 

The Staunton River Association appoint- 
ed to convene or be held at Cane Creek 
Church near Ringgold, Virginia, has been 
called off, for this year, so there will be 
no meeting on Friday, Saturday and 2nd 
Sunday in August 19 31 as stated by min- 
utes of said Association, for reason of 
drought and cotton mill strike which so 
embarrassed our people financially that 
we do not feel able to hold such meeting 
at this time and place. 

Done by order of Cane Creek Church on 
23rd day of May, 1931. 

J. E. HERNDON, Mod. 
R. L. DODSON, Clerk. 



UPPER COUNTRY LINE UNION 

The next session of the Upper Country 
Line Union will be held, the Lord willing, 
with tlie church -at Lynches Creek, Cas- 
well county, N. C, on the 5th Sunday, and 
Saturday before in May 1931. 

The public is cordially invited to at- 
tend, especially ministers. 

This Church is located about 2 miles off 
highway No. 14, between Prospect Hill 
and Hightowers. 

N. C. King, Union Clerk, 



LINVILLE UNION 

The next session of the Linville Union 
is appointed to be held with the Primitive 
Baptist Church, at North Creek, Davie 
County, N. C, on Saturday and fifth Sun- 
day in May 19 31. 

This Church is located on Highway 
No. 9 0 leading from Lexington to Mocks- 
ville, N. C. 

An invitation is extended to brethren, 
sisters and friends, and a special invita- 
tion to ministers. 

W. L. Teague, 

Winston-S.alem, N. C. 



APPOINTMENTS 

Will you please publish in the June 1st 
issue of the Landmark the following ap- 
pointments for Elders W. B. Stadler and 
J. W. Gilliam: 

June 8th (at night) Durham; 

June 9th (at night) Wilson; 

June 10th (11 a. m.) Mill Branch, near 
Elm City; 

June 10th (at night) Falls of Tar River, 
ah Rocky Mt.; 

June 11th (11 ». m.) Spring Green, in 
Martin Co.; 

June 11th (at night) Robersonville; 

June 12th (11 a. m.) Bear Grass; 

June 13th and 14th, Smithwick Creek; 

June 14th (Sunday night) Tarboro; 

June 15th (11 a. m.) Old Beulah; 

June 15th (at night) Raleigh; 

June 16th (at night) Mebane. 

Yours very truly, 
J. W. GILLIAM, Jr. 



EASTERN IJTTLE RIVER UNION 

Please announce E-astern Little River 
Union meeting. 

The next session of the Eastern Little 
River Union will meet with Bethany 
Church, Johnston county, N. C. on Sat- 
urday the 5th Sunday in May 1931. Elder 
T. F. Adams was chosen to preach the In- 
troductory sermon and Eld. J. T. Collier 
his alternate. Brethren, sisters, friends, 
-'.nd ministers especially are cordially In- 
vited to attend. 

Yours in hope, 

J. A. Batten, Union Clerk. 



CONTENTNEA UNION 

The next session of the Contentnea 
Union was appointed to be held with the 
church at Hancocks, Pitt County, N. C 
Elder J. E. Mewborn was appointed to 
preach the introductory sermon -and Elder 
W. B. Kearney as alternate. Hancocks 
church is situated al)out three miles east 
of Ayden, N. C. Take No. 11 highway at 
Greenville or Kinston. A general invita- 
tion is extended. 

J. E. Mewborn, Union Clerk 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

■ AT - 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIV. JUNE 15, 1931 No. 15 



EVERY MAN SHALL SUFFER FOR HIS OWN SINS. 

"In the second year of Joash, son of Jehoahaz, king of Israel reigned 
Amaziali son of Joash king of Judah. 

He was twenty and five years old when he began to reign, and he 
reigned twenty and nine years in Jerusalem. And his mother's name 
was Jehoaddan of Jerusalem. 

Then he did that which was right in the sight of the Lord, yet not like 
his father David; he did according to all the things that Joash his father 
did. 

Howbeit the high places were not taken away; as yet the people did 
sacrifice in burnt incense on the high places. And it came to pass, as 
soon as the kingdom was confirmed in his hand, that he slew his servants 
which had slain the king his father. 

But the children of the murderers he slew not: according to that which 
was written in the book of the law of Moses, wherein the Lord command- 
ed saying, the fathers shall not be put to death for the children and the 
children put to death for the fathers; but every man shall be put to death 
for his own sins. — 2 Kings 14:1-7. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 

ELDER JOEL E. MARSHAL Meadows of Dan, Va. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



2)evote& to the Cause of ^esus Cbcist 



DIVINE AND NATURAL LAW 

We read in the 20th. chapter of 
2nd. Kings an account of Hezekiah, 
King of Judah, who according to 
Bible chronology lived and ruled 
over the Jews about seven hundred 
vears B. C. The incidents which we 
wish to call jyour attention to 
Avere also in the life time of 'Tsaiah 
The Prophet," the son of Amoz. In 
this chapter we are told that Isaiah 
was sent to King Hezekiah with 
fno message that the time had ar- 
rived that he must die a (natural 
death). We are told that the king 
was suffering from some kind of 
boil or sore (probably what today 
would be termed cancer) which 
ordinarily is considered an incur- 
able disease. As we are to under- 
stand the meaning of the scripture 
in this instance according to natur- 
al or the physical laws of nature, 
it was due to the condition 
of the body of Hezekiah. 
There is no natural expla- 
nation as to the reason why he 
did not die. We understand Heze- 
kiah had been a good man, a good 
ruler of God's chosen people, and 
probably it was natural that he de- 
sired to live longer, most people do. 
He prayed a mighty prayer to God 
to be spared, to be healed, and 
God, it is said, heard and had re- 
spect unto his prayer, and added 
f^'fteen years to his natural life. 

The mystery from the human 
standpoint is how or in what man- 



ner was the operation of the di- 
vine law to reverse as it were or 
bring about the change exactly in 
opposition or contrast to the natur- 
al laws of nature. Probably if it 
were given or shown to mortal men 
in a measure at least as to the 
source or workings of spiritual or 
immortal power there would really 
be no mystery. We can now only 
see as it were through a glass dark- 
ly. We know many things are done, 
We see results, 'but how, or in what 
way, the operation of the power 
that worked to bring about the re- 
.-ults we cannot comprehend. 

According to natural law Heze- 
kiah should have died, but the oth- 
er law was brought in action in the 
matter and the natural laws of na- 
ture were brought under subjec- 
tion or overpowered as it were by 
a stronger and more powerful law. 

That the means or power used 
to heal or cure Hezekiah of a nat- 
urally incurable disease is the same 
power that rules over all natural 
or physical matter in the universe, 
we have no doubt. 

In some instances the laws of 
nature were not reversed or chang- 
ed to bring about the results de- 
sired by Jehovah. In the days of 
the Prophet Elijah when there 
was no rain in the land for the 
space of three years and six months, 
and Elijah was commanded to hide 
by a certain brook to escape the 
wrath of "Ahab" in the course of 



226 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



time there being no rain, naturally 
the brook dried up by the oper- 
ations of a natural law. And also 
according to natural law' Elijah had 
to have water to sustain natural 
life. Was this stronger and more 
powerful law brought into action 
at this time to supply water to 
Elijah? No, he was ordered to 
move to. another place. The brook 
icmained dry like the rest of the 
country until it rained. It was not 
the purpose of Jehovah to bring 
into action this stronger more pow- 
erful law at this time. But it was 
used some days after when Elijah 
commanded fire to come down from 
Heaven and consume the captain 
^nd the men sent by "Ahab" to 
capture him. 

There are manifestations of the 
woi-kings of this Stronger more 
powerful law all through holy writ. 
Dumb beasts were made to speak 
with the speech of man. Children 
being born to those long past nat- 
ural age, rivers and seas being part- 
em,! that people could walk through 
as on dry land. Iron made to swim, 
great multitudes being fed from a 
few loaves and fishes. The natur- 
ally dead and buried raised to life. 
'I'hose born blind made to see, etc. 

No wonder that David when he 
had the vision to see and behold 
some of the many works of Jeho- 
vah of the operation of this strong- 
er and all powerful law over phy- 
sical matter, raised his eyes to heav- 
en and exclaimed, "When I consid- 
er Thy heavens, the work of Thy 
fingers, the moon and the stars, 
which thou hast ordained: What is 
man, that thou art mindful of him? 
And the son of man that thou vis- 
ited him." And another said, "Who 
hath measured the waters in the 



hollow of his hand, and meted out 
heaven with the spoon, and com- 
Vrehended the dust of the earth in 
a measure, and weighed the moun- 
tains in scales, and the hills in a 
balance." 

As to Jehovah's power over all 
matter, there are those that main- 
tain that there are thousands of 
ovher natural physical Worlds of 
matter as large or larger than the 
one We live on. I do not doubt it. 
David, Isaiah, Job, all seem to have 
hp.d the same belief when the oper- 
ation of the same power that creat- 
ed one could just as easily and 
with the same power bring into ex- 
istence thousands more is reason- 
able to conceive there being plenty 
room in space, why would He stop 
at one world? 

Sincerely, 
W. F. DODSON. 



EXPERIENCE OF SISTER 
SOMERS. 

Dear brethren and sisters: 

As I have been asked to write 
my experience, I will try in my own 
way to tell what I hope was the 
Lord's dealings with me. 

When I was a child, just eleven 
years old, I was received into the 
Methodist Church. I thought I was 
a Christian. I didn't know any bet- 
ter. I was raised up in that faith. 
My people were all of that faith 
and I didn't know the Baptist doc- 
trine. I am not criticising other 
churches; but this is just the way I 
travelled. 

At the age of 18 the Lord brought 
me to see that I was a sinner. It 
was brought before me that my 
name was in the church book, and 
that I was not fit to be there. I 
began to beg the Lord for mercy 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



227 



and it didn't seem that my prayers 
went any higher than my head. I 
felt that the Lord had turned his 
back on me. It came to me that I 
had been drinking of the cup un- 
worthily. I left the house and went 
into the woods, begging the blessed 
Lord for His mercy, and all at once 
the 'burden was rolled away. I felt 
like my prayers reached to heaven, 
and then I wanted to be baptised. 
I went on and tried to be satisfied, 
and told no one what I had been 
'hrough with. 

In 1914 the trouble of being bap- 
tized came to me again, and I beg- 
ged the blessed Lord to lead me the 
right way; and one night it ap- 
eared to me that I saw a pool of 
water before me, and the people 
gathered around it and 'began to 
.^ing. When I heard the singing I 
jumped up in my bed and it ap- 
peared that the singing went out 
of the window, and I heard them 
singing out of hearing. This troubl- 
ed me so I went to the Methodist 
church and asked for my name. 
Ever since this I have had the im- 
pression to come to these people. 

Brother Denny was pastor at Gil- 
liams' Church at that time, and I 
wanted to tell him what I had been 
through with ; but I just couldn't. I 
v/ent fo hear Elder Gilliam the 
fourth Sunday in last February and 
his text was 'ye are the children of 
light,' and he told just how I felt 
that day. I went back home and 
sat down and cried. The 26th. of 
last June he preached my little 
girl's funeral, and felt I could nev- 
er stand to hear him preach again 
and stayed away from these peo- 
ple. I felt there was no more pleas- 
ure on earth but to go to those 
people. 



I went to Lickfork Association in 
July 1930 on Saturday morning. 
Brother Denny and Brother Gilliam 
preached. I went home that eve- 
ning and I 'believed I was cast clear 
away; but when I went back Sun- 
day morning the preaching was 
irweet to me. The words fell around 
me like grains of gold. After 
preaching they sang a song and op- 
ened up the doors of the church, 
and I found myself going to these 
people. I had* never seen any one 
join the Primitive Baptist church, 
but I went to the stand and Brother 
Gilliam shook hands with me and 
asked me if I wanted to talk to the 
church, and! told him I did. When 
I told these people of my trouble 
they all gave me the right hand of 
fellowship. On the fourth Sunday 
in August three of us were baptiz- 
ed, and that was a happy day with 
me. A home in the church is so 
sweet to me that I don't want to 
inis^ a meeting if I can help it. I 
ftei like a new born babe, seeking 
nothing but the sincere milk of the 
word. Sometimes I get in a dark 
valley of sorrow and trou'ble and it 
seems that the Lord's presence is 
gone forever; but when the dark- 
ness passes away the sun shines 
bright and clear again, and His 
tender love is sweet. I ask the pray- 
ers of all who feel it their duty to 
pray; that I may grow in knowl- 
edge and understanding. 

May the Lord strengthen all min- 
isters in body and mind who 
preach this doctrine and richly re- 
v/ard them for their labor. 

From a sister in hope if one at 
all. 

MRS. L R. SOMERS, 
Altamahaw, N. C. 



228 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



CONSTITUTION FREMONT 
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH 

About five years ago Brother S. 
H. Blow, Mr. J. A. Hooks, Miss 
Ora Copeland and Mrs. Ella Peele 
purchased the Christian Church 
building of Fremont, N C, for the 
purpose of the Primitive Baptist 
holding services here, and asked 
Elder J. C. Hooks to preach there 
once a month, which he did for two 
years, much to our comfort and 
satisfaction. 

Seeing much interest manifested, 
't was his great desire' to see a 
church organized here, but our dear 
Saviour took him away to eternal 
glory, and the great reward that 
we feel av^^aited him before this 
v;ork was done. But the great God 
who took him away, sent us an- 
other, Elder S. B. Denny, who still 
spoke messages of peace, and fed 
our souls, and made us rejoice de- 
claring the unsearchable riches of 
God's word. 

At the conclusion of services on 
Sunday April 19th. 1931 Elder 
Denny asked all the congregation 
who wished to continue services 
here to raise their hands, every 
hand went up; then he asked for 
'those who wished to move their 
membership to stand, there were 
two sisters stood up, and some one 
spoke for an absent sister, who 
wanted to join us. He then opened 
the doors of the church, and oh, 
howl our hearts v/ere made to re- 
joice in thanks to God, when Mrs. 
Pennie Daniels, who loved the 
dear old story of Salvation by grace, 
came seeking a home with us. She 
was received, but owing to the fact 
that a church had not been organ- 
ized, she was not baptized until it 
was organized. It was agreed to 



organize the 3rd. Sunday in May, 
1931, and then have the baptising. 

On Sunday morning May 17th, 
1931, the Council of ordained helps 
from the various churches were 
present as follows: Nahunta 
Church, Deacon Richard D. Pate, 
Wilson Church, Deacons, W. H. 
Keaton, J. A. Stephenson, W. E. 
Turner, T. D. Thomas, and J. B. 
Barron, Memorial Church, Deac- 
ons, John E. Smith and R. L. 
Hooks, Black Creek Church, Deac- 
ons, S .P. Strickland and J. G. Mer- 
cer, Aycocks Church, Deacon S. H. 
Blow, Scotts Church, Deacons Da- 
vid Bryant and Isaac Lamm, Bear 
Creek Church, Deacon, R W. Sut- 
ton. Elders present, John W. Gard- 
rer, Goldsboro, N. C, E. L. Cobb, 
Wilson, N. C, S. B. Denny, Wil- 
son, N. C. 

This Council organized by choos- 
ing Elder S. B. Denny, Moderator 
and Brother W. E. Turner, Clerk. 
By motion and second the Council 
agreed to proceed with the organ- 
ization as follows: 
Organization of the Fremont F'rim- 
itive Baptist Church. 
On Motion. 

1st. Agreed to call for letters, 
Minnie Hooks was received by let- 
ter, lona Peacock was received by 
letter. 

2nd. Agreed to extend the right 
hand of fellowship to Sister Pennie 
Daniels and those who were re- 
ceived by letters. 

3rd. Agreed to adopt covenant 
presented and read before the con- 
ference. 

4th. Agreed to adopt articles of 
faith presented and read before 
conference. 

5th. Agreed to adopt rules of 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



229 



decorum presented and read before 
conference. 

6th. Agreed to call Elder S. B. 
Denny as Pastor. 

7th. Agreed to appoint Sister 
lona Peacock as Clerk. 

8th. Agreed to have yearly meet- 
ing the third Sunday in September. 

9th. Agreed to record minutes as 
read. 

After the organization of the 
church, Elders Gardner and Cobb 
preached very appropriate sermons 
for this occasion. 

A step farther — all truth loving, 
God-fearing men and women in or 
out of the church organization 
could not withhold admiration for 
the manifest fine Spirit that char- 
acterized this meeting. 

Written by a little sister I hope, 
Mrs. J. A. Peacock, 
Clerk, Fremont Primitive Bap- 
tist Church. 



EDITORIALS AND OTHER 
WRITINGS ENDORSED. 

I am glad indeed of the Editor- 
ials of April 15th, by Elders O. J. 
Denny and J. T. Rowe, and the ar- 
ticle copied from Eld. J. D. Cock- 
ran, all of which is sound scriptural- 
ly and will tend to unify our people 
upon a sound, loving scriptural 
basis. I wish every Primitive Bap- 
tist would read those good, timely 
articles and act accordingly. Surely 
all have had war enough. Let all 
labor in love to heal the wounds 
that have been made. Jesus said 
to first get the beam out of our own 
eye. James says, "Confess your 
faults one to another, and pray 
with and for one another that you 
may be healed." As we doing this? 
Bitter personalities in our papers 
are wrong. Continued agitating 



questions of a confusing nature will 
estrange good brethren and cause 
heartaches and bitter tears. 

I love the writings of Elders 
Denny and Rowe. God bless 
them. 

We are brethren. We are the 
body of Christ and members in par- 
ticular. If one member suffers, 
the whole body suffers. The world, 
the flesh and Satan oppose the Old 
Baptist church ; but the world can- 
not hurt us like we can hurt our- 
selves. We are all poor needy sin- 
ners and all make some mistakes 
and should be willing to confess all 
wrongs and forgive each other. We 
should agree to use Scriptural terms 
on controverted points. All Primi- 
tive Baptists believe in the sovere- 
ignty of God and are predestinar- 
ians as Paul was (Rom. 8:29, 30; 
Eph. 1:5) and believe in accounta- 
bility and that God is not the au- 
thor of sin, neither does He coerce, 
or influence any to sin. Sin and un- 
holiness do not proceed from God. 
All true Baptists accept the posi- 
tions held by Elders Denny and 
Rowe and Dr. John Gill, Elders 
Hassell, Gold, Respess, Mitchell and 
a host of others. 

Perhaps, we shall never find 
universal peace among our dear 
people here on earth, yet we should 
strive for the things that make for 
peace. We are commanded to all 
speak the same things. We should 
all speak the truth in love. We 
should love God supremely and love 
one another with pure hearts fer- 
vently. We will never injure those 
whom we love. We all agree on 
the essentials. When I joined the 
dear old church, I often had many 
doubts and fears, fearing I had de- 
ceived the 'best people on earth; 



230 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



but I found much sweet comfort in 
the language : "We know we have 
passed from death unto life be- 
cause We love the brethren." "Love 
is of God and every one that loveth 
is born of God and knoweth God." 

I do believe that I love God's 
humble children wherever they are. 
We may disagree on some things, 
but when I see one whom grace has 
made his heart soft and his only 
hope is the sovereign grace of God, 
I love him or her. Even if I dis- 
agree with any on some little tech- 
nical point, I desire to treat all 
kindly. We should overcome evil 
with good. "Vengeance is mine, I 
will repay saith the Lord." Think of 
the blessed Jesus: He was led as a 
sheep to the slaughter; and like a 
lamb dumb 'before his shearer, so 
openeth he not his mouth." Oh, 
that we all could exhibit the same 
meek and lowly spirit. When He 
was reviled. He reviled not again. 
"He was despised and rejected of 
men. A man of sorrows and ac- 
quainted with grief." None of us 
will ever ihave greater sufferings 
than Jesus had. It is through much 
tribulation we enter the kingdom. 
"He that will live godly in Christ 
Jesus shall suffer persecution." Oh, 
let the persecution and untrue ac- 
cusations all be false. How import- 
ant for us to preach as we go by 
our daily walk and godly conver- 
Bation. 

I know I am old and nearing my 
eternal home. Just a few more bit- 
ter tears to shed then I trust my 
blessed Jesus will call me home. I 
rejoice in the sweet hope that my 
mortal body will be changed and 
fashioned like unto His glorious 
body. When we reach that sweet 
home of the soul, there will be no 



more sad farewells, no more pain, 
no more sickness, no more death, 
but we shall bask in His sweet 
f:miles forever. We hate to leave our 
home here, but we have a better 
home awaiting us up yonder than 
this. We hate to leave our relatives 
and friends, but we have more re- 
latives and friends in heaven than 
here. The older I grow the dearer 
heaven is to me. I told a dear 
j)reacher recently, Svhen ,'he was 
speaking of the heavenly joys here, 
I enjoyed that sweet thought and 
we have foretaste of heaven now, 
but let us not believe it is all here, 
for I am hoping to soon go to that 
sweet heaven of rest which will be 
heaven with all its fullness. Fath- 
er, ^otheit, Tbrother, ^ister, hus- 
band, wife and little babe are there, 
but the sweet thought, Jesus is 
there. "Where Jesus is will be heav- 
en for me." I cannot tell so much 
about how we shall appear only, 
"when He shall appear, we shall be 
like Him." We never shall be satis- 
fied here, but then shall we be sat- 
isfied when we awake with thy 
likeness. Blessed thought. Thank 
God I have the sweet hope: "I 
shall see Him for myself." Then let 
us all be followers of God as dear 
children and walk in love. Pray for 
me. I am poor and needy. 
Yours in a sweet hope, 

LEE HANKS. 
1800 N. Decatur Rd., Atlanta, Ga. 



EXPERIENCE 

Dear readers of Zion's Landmark: 
I have been requested to give 
a little description of my life from 
childhood till now. While I see 
nothing wonderful in my life save 
the love and mercy of God that has 
been manifested to all of his chil- 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



231 



dren, I was born Oct. 10, 1863, in 
a log cabin, 2 miles from where I 
now live. So far as I know I was 
just an ordinary intelligent child. 
For a few years I could talk as oth- 
er children; but one Saturday eve- 
ning, while toddling along in front 
of my dear mother, the world 
around me went dark and I lapsed 
into unconsciousness and was car- 
ried to the house in my mother's 
arms as dead. I lay in a coma for 
48 hours and when JL ^jcevived it 
was with a bad stammering tongue. 
I was never the same, happy, care 
free child again. While my little 
playmates were kind, and helpful, 
some times they would laugh at 
me, which always kept me embar- 
rassed. Thus I grew to young man- 
hood, always trying to shun strang- 
ers and keeping silent in their com- 
pany. Thus living in rebellion 
against God for having thus afflict- 
ing me above that of my play- 
mates and young companions. 

But, the time came when, ac- 
cording to my hope, God opened my 
eyes to see my condition as a sin- 
ner. Then my rebellious thoughts 
v/jere turned into supplication and 
prayer. 

Then the great wonder with me 
was why such a sinner as I was, 
had been allowed even a stammer- 
ing tongue or eyes to behold my 
mother or any of God's beautiful 
creation. Thus for three years I 
mourned on account of my sins, 
pleading for mercy, sometimes try- 
ing to hide my trouble by engaging 
in nothing and gay company; but 
always adding more trouble, until 
I almost got afraid to try to pray. 

I passed this to the time when I 
hope God spoke peace to my weary 
soul^ by vsaying "arise and sing 



praises to God for you hath been 
quickened and given a heart of un- 
derstandixig. Then JI was full of 
love and thankfulness. All things 
animate seemed to be praising God, 
for his mercy to poor sinners like 
me. 

I had omitted to say during my 
trouble I had begun having some 
kind of spells; something like 
epileptic fits. During those times, of 
unconsciousness I would sing and 
pray. So after my deliverance, I had 
a desire to join the church; but 
knew I could not relate my exper- 
ience. So I became so burdened, I 
could not eat nor sleep. Then in one 
of the spells of unconsciousness, I 
wrote my experience and was re- 
ceived and baptized into fellow- 
ship of the church, thinking I had 
fulfilled what God had required of 
me. Then the burden to preach ov- 
er shadowed me. I began to wonder 
v/hy God would pass by so many 
intelligent, elegant young men and 
require public service from this 
poor ignorant stammering boy. But, 
bless His Holy name. He made me 
realize that he could loose the 
tongues. So with this assurance I 
went into the service and for more 
than forty years I have gone when 
and where I could and have tried 
to be faithful, trying to take the 
word of God as the only rule of 
faith and practice. 

I would love to admonish the 
brethren against extreme unscrip- 
tural expressions, but am so ner- 
vous must stop. Pray for me and 
use this as you deem, wise. 

JOEL E. MARSHALL. 
In Gospel Bond, 
Meadows of Dan, Va. 



Just received a, shipment of 

LTiO^T) HYMN BOOKS 
8. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 



232 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



94 YEARS OLD AND 

STILL PREACHING 

Mr| John D. Gold, 
Dear Friend : 

I am enclosing my check for five 
dollars to 'be disposed of as fol- 
lows: Credit my subscription ac- 
count for Landmark, one dollar 
and $4.00 for Elder W. J. Stephen- 
son, Coats, NCI have a little left, 
every month, of my income not 
needed for personal use and am 
glad to assist others not so fortun- 
ate. Then, too, I have all my lov- 
ing and loyal children and grand 
children, within close touch all the 
time and you will agree with me 
when I say I am most wonderful- 
Ij'- blessed of the Lord, though go- 
ing along in my 94th. year of age 
since March 1st, The Lord being my 
very present help in all times of 
need. I hope to go next Sunday, 
and try to preach from the same 
pulpit that I stood in seventy odd 
years ago, and tried to tell a little 
of the story of Gethsemane and 
the Cross — Salvation by Grace and 
Grace alone. 

I am only here temporarily, so 
you will Jplease change my ad- 
dress from 1929 So. 4th. St., Spring- 
field, 111. 

Very truly yours, 
J. G. SAWIN, 

Springfield, 111. 



A LITTLE LEAVEN LEAVENETH 
THE LUMP. 

"A little leaven leaveneth the 
whole lump." Gal. 5:9. 

That is the nature of leaven; "it 
puffs up". 1 Cor. 5:2. He said to 
them : 

"Your glorying is not good." 
They were verily puffed up by 
their fleshly mind" and were re- 



joicing at their "sweet peace" but 
the apostle Paul who knew, said 
to them "you had better (be in 
mourning, and in sorrow rather 
than to be glorying. 

An examination shows that the 
Galatian church was holding in 
their church fellowship one living 
in adultery, and fornication of a 
character which heathens would 
not tolerate, that one should have 
his father's wife, and hence he 
could truly say, "you are puffed 
up, and he shows those who did so 
should be taken away from among 
them." 

"When you be assembled togeth- 
er, and my spirit with you, delivers 
such a one to satan for the destruc- 
tion of the flesh". Exclusion here 
was the only kind of discipline to 
be carried out, for Paul said, you 
•should not eat with fornicators, 
liowbeit not the fornicators of this 
world, but if any man who is call- 
ed a brother be a fornicator, with 
such know not to eat. 

Christ was purely unleavened, 
and when we do keep the feast, it 
must not 'be with the old leaven, 
neither with the leaven of malice 
arid wickedness, but with the un- 
leavened bread of sincerity and 
truth. Cast out the old leaven that 
you may be a new lump, for a lit- 
tle leaven of this kind, but carried 
by the church will soon ruin or 
pollute the whole church, and the 
word leaven is used by Paul be- 
cause it works until it will affect 
the whole of that in whom it is plac- 
ed. If the church knowingly tries to 
keep in fellowship and called a 
brother, or member, who is a for- 
nicator or covetous, as an idola- 
tor, or sailor, or drunkard, or an 
extortioner, that church sooner or 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



233 



later must die, "for a little leaven 
leaveneth the whole lump." 

I once pastored a church, where 
they were putting up with drunk- 
enness, and I learned of it, and rais- 
ed my voice against it, and the 
mem'bers continued to drink to ex- 
cess. I then warned the church, 
but they said, "you are right," but 
they would not be separated from 
drunkenness. One influential mem- 
ber would say "give the brother a 
chance" and they gave the brother 
a chance, until now the whole body 
i^^ cast into hell. "A little leaven 
leaveneth the whole lump" my 
thought was, (and I »was happiy 
with the idea) that the church 
would put away those drunkards, 
and thus cast out that old leaven 
and be a new lump, but when as- 
semibled together it was "a little 
more sleep, a little more slumber, 
a little more folding the hands." 

I gave them up of course and now 
they exist under an entirely differ- 
ent administration, vainly striving 
to live but Hosanahs languish on 
their tongues and their devotion 
dies. 

J. T. SATTERWHITE. 
517 1931. 



THE TRIALS AND HARDSHIPS 
OF LIFE. 

Mr. J. R. Jones, 
Pilot Mountain, N. C. 
Dear Brother: 

Your good letter to hand a few 
days ago and I was glad to hear 
from you. You speak of trials and 
hardships through which you have 
passed, yet the fact that you have 
passed through them is proof that 
the Lord has been merciful. 

We read "they that walked in 
darkness have seen a great light, 



and upon them that dwell in the 
regions and shadow of death upon 
them hath this light shined." We 
do not read of Christ being the 
light of any except those who are 
in darkness, save when they arise 
with him above the darkness, and 
despair of this world. 

We also read, "In the world ye 
shall have tribulation, but in Me 
peace." This is spoken in no un- 
certain terms. 

If we did not have our tribula- 
tions, we might well say we were 
bastards and not sons of God. 

The Grace of God is sufficient for 
the day and trial of his people, and 
when tried as gold is tried in the 
furnace; they shall come forth. If 
they did not go into the furnace 
they could not come forth from the 
furnace. 

If there was no bondage there 
could be no deliverance, therefore, 
the one is set over against the oth- 
er. We could not know joy, if we 
knew not sorrow. We cannot ap- 
preciate health if we knew not 
sickness, and therefore it is a part 
of God's eternal purpose that His 
people shall be tried in all points 
as Jesus, their saviour was tried, 
that He might know how and with 
their trials and temptations to 
make a way for their escape. 

We are without news of inter- 
est. Regret to hear of the illness of 
j^our brother T. A. Jones. 

Wishing you many pleasant days, 
yet to come and joy everlasting be- 
yond time, I am as ever. 

Yours in hope, 
O. J. DENNY. 



FOR BRO. W. J. STEPHENSON 

Elder J. G. Sawin, Spring- 
field, 111. $4.00 



234 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Zion's Landmark 



"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 

Associate Editors 
Elder M, L. Gilbert — Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. No. 15 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C. JUNE 15, 1931 



VASHTI. 

The story of Vashti in the Bible 
is very short. She is mentioned 
only in the 1st and 2nd chapters of 
the book of Esther. The first men- 
tion of her is in the 9th verse of the 
first chapter. It is said in the fifth 
verse that the King made a feast to 
all the people that were present in 
Shushan the palace for seven days, 
and the 9th verse says, "Also 
Vashti, the queen made a feast for 
the women in the royal house which 
belonged to the king Ahasuerus." 
10th verse, "On the seventh day 
when the heart of the king was 
made merry with wine, he com- 
manded the seven chamberlains 
that served in his presence." 11th 
verse. "To bring Vashti the queen 
before the king with the crown 
royal, to show the people and the 
princes her beauty, for she was fair 



to look on." 12th verse, "But the 
queen Vashti refused to come at the 
king's commandment by his cham- 
berlains: therefore was the king 
very wroth, and his anger burned in 
him." Then as his manner was he 
called his wise men that knew the 
times, law and judgment, and he 
asked them what should be done 
to Queen Vashti because she hath 
not performed the commandment of 
the king, and one Memucan, an- 
swered that Vashti, the queen, hath 
not done wrong to the king only, 
but to all the people that are in the 
king's provinces. And he charged 
that when this act of the queen 
shall come abroad to all women that 
they will despise their husbands in 
their eyes. And so it is decreed 
that Vashti come no more before 
the king, and her crown is taken 
from her. Now, I think this charge 
that Vashti's act will cause all the 
women in the kingdom to despise 
their husbands in their eyes is 
groundless. I find in the first vol- 
ume of Josephus, page 302, that the 
king was desirous to show Vashti, 
who exceeded all other women in 
beauty, to those who feasted with 
him. But she out of regard to the 
laws of the Persians which forbid 
the wives to be seen by strangers, 
did not go to the king. Not only 
did the laws of the Persians forbid 
the wives to be seen by strangers, 
but the law of decency as well. In 
a foot note at the bottom of the 
second column I find the following: 
"If the Chaldee paraphrist be in 
the right, that Artaxerxes (known 
in the Bible as Ahasuerus) intended 
to show Vashti to his guests naked, 
it is no wonder at all that she would 
not submit to such an indignity, 
and that the king had some such 
design seems not improbable, for 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



235 



otherwise the principal of these 
royal guests could be no strangers 
to the queen, nor unapprised of her 
beauty, so far as decency admitted. 
So taking all these things in consid- 
eration I feel that Vashti is to be 
commended instead of condemned 
for obeying the Persian law that 
forbid her being seen by strangers, 
also the law of decency, rather than 
the command of a drunken king 
even though he was her husband. I 
know that in the Bible wives are 
told to obey their husbands, but I 
find that husbands are told to ren- 
der to their wives due benevolence. 
1st. Cor. 7:3. The husband is the 
head of the wife, as Christ is head 
of the church. Eph. 5 :23, verse 
83. Let every one love his wife 
even as himself. Giving honor to 
his wife as the weaker vessel. 1st 
Peter 3:7. He that loveth his wife 
loveth himself. Eph. 5:28, 25th 
verse says. Husbands love your 
wives, even as Christ also loved the 
church and gave Himself for it. Do 
not these scriptures all show that 
the first obligation is on the hus- 
band to show himself loving and 
faithful to his wife? And where 
is the husband who loves his wife 
as his own body, that loves his wife 
as Christ loves the church, that does 
not give honor to her as the weaker 
vessel, that does not render to her 
due benevolence. Will he require 
unreasonable things of her? Will 
he wish to expose her to gratify a 
wicked ambition? No indeed, but he 
will seek to comfort her in every 
possible way, protect her from in- 
jury and humiliation, and make life 
as easy for her as is in his power to 
do. And when a wife sees that her 
husband loves her and cares for her 
in this way, I feel that the most of 
them at least, will take pleasure in 
obeying him. But when a man is 



drunk with wine, selfishness or com- 
mon rascality, the wife is under no 
obligation to obey his unreasonable 
demands. He promised to be a lov- 
ing and faithful husband. He has 
signally failed, and so as he has 
broken his promise, hers is not 
binding. Woman is the greatest 
blessing to man. She is his help- 
mate. She is his mother. She is 
his companion in holy wedlock. She 
is his own body. She is taken from 
his side, not his feet not his head. 
She is neither to be above or be- 
neath him, but by his side, his com- 
panion, his equal, the most loved 
and honored of all beings or things. 
Can any normal man look upon a 
woman as the sharer of his joys and 
sorrows, his poverty or his wealth, 
the mother of his children, without 
a fervent desire in his heart to pro- 
tect, cherish and honor her even 
above himself. 

Then we have some scriptures in 
regard to the standing of women 
in the church that I feel have been 
misunderstood. Paul says, "Let 
the woman learn in silence with all 
subjection. But I suffer not a 
woman to teach nor to usurp auth- 
ority over the man, but to be in 
silence." 1st. Tim. 2:11-12. Then 
in 1st Cor. 14:34-35, he says. "Let 
your women keep silence in the 
churches, for it is not permitted un 
to them to speak. I feel that when 
we read these connections we shall 
find that Paul is talking about pub- 
lic service in the church, like 
preaching or praying. I under- 
stand that Paul means to tell us that 
women are not called to preach and 
so should not be allowed to pre- 
sume to do so. But that they had 
a place in the service of the church 
is evident from the following from 
the same apostle. He says, "I com- 



236 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



mend unto you Phoebe, our sister, 
which is a servant of the Church at 
Cenchrea. That ye receive her in 
the Lord as becometh saints, and 
that we assist her in whatsoever 
business she hath need of you for 
she hath been a succorer of many 
and of myself also. Greet Priscilla 
and Aquila, my helpers in Christ 
Jesus. Rom. 16:1, 2, 3. 6th verse, 
greet Mary, who bestowed much la- 
bor on us. 

Then in Phil. 4:3, he says, "I en- 
treat thee also true yoke fellow, 
help those women which labored 
with me in the gospel. 

While Paul does not in these 
scriptures say just in what way 
those women served, he plainly 
shows that the sisters were partners 
in the service of the church with 
the brethren, and should be recog- 
nized in the church business, for 
many of them are gifted in an un- 
derstanding of the scriptures and of 
good order in the house of God. 
And I have known some who could 
talk about those things very instruc- 
tively, and are of much comfort and 
encouragement to the ministry. 
They know when they hear the gos- 
pel preached as well as the brethren 
and so should be consulted in re- 
nrards to one's gift in the church. I 
have found many of them helpers in 
more ways than I could mention 
here. And they always have their 
vote in the business affairs of our 
churches. It is by special request 
that I write about Vashti, that all 
this is written and I have said what 
J Ihink of her in a natural way, but 
V^at the God of heaven had a pur- 
pose in Esther coming to the king- 
dom there is no doubt, and that ^hc 
served that purpose there is no 
doubt, and that the Lord has used 
women as well as men both in the 
ia.^r and the gospel service there is 



no doubt, and they should regard 
each other in this service as the 
Lord has manifestly placed them. 
Woman is often used in the scrip- 
tures as a type of the Church of 
God, and to whom should we ren- 
der service more than the church of 
God, or who should we honor more. 
She is by all endearing ties related 
to us. Jesus said, "He that doeth 
the will of my father, which is in 
heaven the same is my brother, my 
sister and mother." Then let us 
do her honor and not feel ourselves 
above her. Here are all the com- 
forts of homo. Brothers help to 
love and care for sister, the undy- 
ing affection of mother, who will 
bear with all of our weaknesses as 
no other will do. Thank God for 
woman, for her love and devotion 
to the cause of our God. Many times 
should I have faltered but for the 
encouragement of the woman 
whom the Lord gave to be with me. 
Whoso findeth a wife findeth a 
•good thing, and obtaineth favor of 
the Lord. Proverbs 18:22. 

JOSHUA T. ROWE. 



CONFINED TO HIS ROOM FOR 
YEARS. 

We regret to learn that Brother 
S. C. Huff of Atlanta, Ga., has been 
confined to his room for about four 
years. We hope that the Lord vdll 
be very gracious and good to him 
and soon raise him from his bed of 
affliction. 

J.D. GOLD. 



ELDER VAIL SICK 

My father, Elder D. M. Vail is 
sick in bed and has been for some 
time, and if you want to you might 
put it in your paper that he is sick 
and not able to answer any corre- 
spondence but enjoys hearing from 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



237 



his friends. God help you in all 
you do. Thanks. Farewell. 

D. M. VAIL, 
Per Mrs. D. O. Merrick, 
his daughter, 

28 Willard St., 
Binghampton, New York. 



FRED LANGDON. 

It is with a sad heart that I write a few 
lines in memory of my little nephew, Fred 
Langdon. On April 11, the death angel 
visited the home of our dear Brother 
James and Sister Mayme Langdon and 
claimed their darling little boy. 

Fred was born Oct. 30, 1924 and died 
April 11, 1931, making his stay on earth 
6 years, 5 months and 11 days. He was 
taken with measles and never fully recov- 
ered from them before pneumonia de- 
veloped, and then only lived one week. All 
was done for him that loving parents, a 
kind physician, nurse, relatives, and 
friends could do. 

It was so hard to give him up, but the 
good Lord knows best and he doeth all 
things well. "The Lord giveth and the 
Lord taketh away, blessed be the name of 
the Lord." 

We feel sure, dear ones that your dar- 
ling is at rest, and is through with his 
sufferings and troubles, and his sweet 
spirit is basking in the sunlight of God's 
love. We miss his sweet face and 
smiles and his dear voice so much, for he 
was such a good natured child, and wore 
a smile for those he met. 

All through his sickness he took his 
medicine so sweet, never murmuring or 
complaining of hurting. He leaves be- 
hind to mourn his departure, a heart bro- 
ken father and mother, and four brothers, 
and a host of relatives and little friends. 

I have buried one little boy and I would 
not call him back into this world of trou- 
bles for all the gold and silver, for I feel 
sure he is richer now than any man with 
his millions in this world. Sing on, dear 
little ones, the sweet songs of grace. We 
are sweetly hoping to join you some sweet 
day, where heartaches will be felt no more. 
May this be your happy lot, dear brother 
and sister, together with all your dear 
children, if it be the dear Lord's will. In 
His Word He said: "Suffer little children 
to come unto me and forbid them not, for 
of such is the Kingdom of Heaven." I do 
thank and praise His holy name for the 
assurance of the fact that He is the Sav- 
iour of our dear and precious children. I 
do pray God to reconcile you to the death 
of your darling boy. 

Dear brother and sister, bear it the best 
you can, and grieve not as though you 
have no hope of meeting little Fred again. 



Live in hope of meeting him again beyond 
this vale of tears where we will not have 
to part any more. Comforting words 
were spoken over his little body by Elders 
W. R. Monk, Roxboro, N. C, and E. C. 
Jones of Dunn, N. C. Then he was laid 
to rest beneath a mound of flowers in the 
cemetery at Fellowship Church, just be- 
fore sunset on Sunday, April 12th, there 
to rest until the resurrection morning, 
where his little body will be raised again, 
not a natural but a spiritual body. 

May God bless you, dear brother and 
sister In your sad bereavement and help 
you to bear it, is the prayer of one that 
sympathizes with you in all your troubles. 

"Fred is gone but not forgotten. 
Never will his memory fade, 
For sweetest thoughts will ever linger, 
Around the grave where he was laid. 
Heaven retaineth now our treasure, 
Earth the lonely casket keeps. 
And the sunbeams love to linger, 
Where our darling Fred sleeps." 

Written by his Aunt, with great sym- 
pathy, 

MRS. ELGIB WILLIAMS. 



IN MEMORY OF IDA PEARL ROBBINS 

It was in the year of nineteen-thirty one; 

The saddest day of our life that we can re- 
call or remember. 

The sadness was the calling of our dear 

Sister, who so softly answered. 

And returned home with a smile. 

But Jesus knew she was His and took her 
in his care. 

"Thy will be done, O Lord; 

Thy will be done not mine. 

And can not we repeat this vow, 

Not our will, O Lord, but Thine." 

Now she is in heaven's repose, 

Though we did all in our power, 

We remember your tender hand, 

Now it holds a sacred flower. 

Now we have a little flower. 

So often we look at this, 

And think of you, dear one, 

And there we place a kiss. 

Some bright day we will meet you 

Up above the azure skies; 

There we will remain, 

Where loved ones never die. 

Written by her sister, 

MRS. WALTER BRICE. 



J. B. MIZELL 

Brother J. B. Mizzell was born Febru- 
ary 21, 1872 and died March 28, 1931, 
making his stay on earth 59 years, 1 
month and 7 days. His funeral was con- 
ducted by his pastor. Elder J. L. Ross, 
after which he was laid to rest by his dear 
companion in the old Ward burying 
ground near Bethel, N. C. 



238 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



To this union were born seven children, 
four boys and three girls, boys, Frederick, 
Leland, Joseph and Graham, girls, Mary, 
Elizabeth and Lenora. Joseph died in in- 
fancy. 

Bro. Mizell united with the Church at 
Briery Swamp Saturday before the second 
Sunday in August, 19 30 and was baptised 
the same day by his pastor. Elder J. L. 
Ross.He only had a name with us seven 
months, but I feel that I can say with truth 
that he had a desire to be with us long be- 
fore he was. He leaves to mourn his de- 
parture six children, eight grandchildren, 
two brothers, four sisters and a number 
of relatives and friends. Brother Mizell 
had been in feeble health for a few years, 
gradually growing weaker with high blood 
pressure and paralysis, until he had served 
his days out. The Lord saw fit to take 
him out of his suffering, where we hope 
he is sweetly resting in the arms of Jesus 
who does all things well and makes no 
mistake. 

Brother Mizell was first cousin to the 
writer. I knew him in my early days. He 
lived a straight and honest life as far as 
I knew. He was a tiller of the soil by the 
help of the Lord. He provided for his 
family remarkably and made an honest 
living. He was kind and peaceable among 
his family. 

Oh how we hate to give up those we 
love so but God loves them best. 

We, the church at Briary Swamp, hope 
our losing Brother Mizell is to his eternal 
gain. 

Done by order of conference Saturday 
before the second Sunday in April 1931. 
Elder J. L. Ross, Moderator, 
C. L. James, Church Clerk. 
G. A. Ross, 
C. L. James, 

Committee. 



IN MEMORY OF JOHN MARSHAL 
TOMME 

When on April 5, 19 31, the news of the 
passing of John Marshal Tomme was 
spread in his, and surrounding communi- 
ties, there was great sadness, because he 
was much beloved and held in high es- 
teem by all who knew him. 

When a useful man is called from his 
loved ones in this case, a wife and six 
small children, and with his going, the 
kindness, loving care, devotion, and re- 
sponsibility in a financial way all at one 
stroke, it is indeed a shock! Such a situa- 
tion would bring a gloom through which 
no ray of light could pierce if there were 
not a bright side to the picture. Thonsjh 
broken hearted, the wife, l>y faith, can 
trust in the promise of God that He will 
be a husband to the widow and a father to 
the fatherless. The Heavenly Father "who 
doeth all things well," called him and 
transferred him to a better and more beau- 



tiful home. So she can think oi him as 
mingling with the saints who have gone 
before, and serving his INIaster whom he 
loved and served in this life. Should not 
this make heaven sweeter to her children, 
to his friends and relatives and inspire 
them to follow in the footsteps of thU lov- 
ed one who lived such an exemplary life 
here? For he was a man of unquestionable 
cht.iracter, honost and reliable. He posses- 
ed a true knowledge of morality, truth and 
right. Greater than all that, he was a de- 
vout christian, living his faith every day. 
He had a cheerful nature, never happier 
than when making others happy. But these 
and other characteristics will long live 
in the hearts of those who knew him best 

He was born June 1, 187 5 and lived the 
greater part of his life in Troup County 
not far from LaGrange. In early life he 
joined the Primitive Baptist church at 
Lebanon, eight miles south of Lagrange, 
and was ever after a conscientious mem- 
ber, doing everything a good christian 
could do for the uplift and encouragement 
of his church. 

His children are Mary Ruth, aged 12. 
Lou Ellen, aged 10, John Marshal Jr., 
aged 8, Robert Simeon, aged 6, Albert 
Jackson, aged 3, and Christine Omega, 
aged 3 months. 

Besides his wife and children he leaves 
five sisters, Miss Ella Tomme who lived 
with him; Mrs. Y/^ill Ciramonsi of Euena 
Vista, Ga., Mrs. L. D. Pratt, Mrs. Ruben 
Taylor and Mrs. Ab Hardy of New West 
Point, and many friends who mourn be- 
cause he is no more. 

His funeral was held at his church, con- 
ducted by his pastor. Eld. J. W. Harmon, 
of Opelika Ala., assisted by Eld. J. T. Sat- 
terwhite of LaFayette Ala. Then the body 
was laid to rest in Lebanon cemetery. 

MRS. F. J. PIKE. 



KKSOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Wliereas, through the infinite wisdom 
of our gracious Father to call our beloved 
Sister Temesia Belvin home, who was a 
mother as well as a devoted member of 
our church at Eno, and joined the church 
July 1876, and died Oct. 30th, 1930. She 
was born Oct. 17th, 1845 which made her 
8 5 years old. To know her wtas to love 
her. May we all be reconciled to her death 
for blessed are the dead that die in the 
Lord God said the spirit, that they rest 
from their labors and their works do fol- 
low after them. 

Therefore be it resolved: 

First: That in the death of sister Belvin 
our church has lost a loving mother and 
f :>tcM-. but to her we believe it has brought 
eternal slory. 

Second: That we desire in humble sub- 
mission to he resigned to the mMII of our 
heavenly Father and to extend to the be- 
reaved family our heartfelt sympathy. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



239 



Third: That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the family of the deceased and 
one to the Landmark for publication and 
one also to be placed on the church book. 

Done by order of the church at Eno in 
conference Saturday before the fourth 
Sunday in May 1931. 

Elder Charles Wood, Moderator 
Charley M. Mayhew, Clerk 



LENA B. SMITH 

In loving remembrance of our dear sis- • 
ter, Lena E. Smith, who on March 1st, 
1931, was visited by the death angel who 
took her sweet spirit from the shores of 
time to the glorious regions of imortality. 

Sister Smith was born November d7th, 
1868. She was married to James B. Smith 
October 12th, 1892. To this union were 
born one son and one daughter whom with 
her husband she leaves to mourn their 
loss. 

Sister Smith was a loving mother and 
B devoted companion. 

She was united with the church by bap- 
tism at Black River church December 
1898, she was a faithful member and was 
prompt in attendng her church meetings, 
she believed in reading scriptures and 
seemed to enjoy spiritual conversations. 

Funeral services were conducted by 
Eld. E. C. Jones, Xure Lee, and L. A. Jon- 
son at her home after which the body was 
laid to rest in Green Wood Cemetery. 

We shall miss her, but we hope some 
sweet day to enter through the portals 
Into that blessed city, where she is now 
resting with Jesus and the blessed an- 
gels. 

It is the request of this church that 
a copy of this memoir be sent to Zion's 
Landmark, a copy to the Advocate Messen- 
ger and a copy to the family. 

Done by order of conference Saturday 
before third Sunday in April 1931. 

Elder E. C. Jones, Moderator 
W. P. Griffin, C. C. 



MRS. R. L. JEFFERSON 

Please publish the death of our beloved 
sister, Mrs. R. L. Jefferson, who departed 
this life fourth Sunday in January 1931. 
She was 44 years old. She joined the 
church at Autreys Creek, about seven or 
eight years ago, where she was a devoted 
member until her death. Words cannot ex- 
press how I felt when they came and told 
me she was dead, for she was a very dear 
sister to me. In the community in which 

j she lived she was always ready and wil- 

1 ling to lend a kind and helping hand to 

: any one in trouble. 

She was pal, playmate and mother to 

I her children and a devoted wife to her 
husband. 

' We ail miss her at home, church and 



everywhere we are in the habit of seeing 
her. 

God called her home and may we all 
be reconciled to his will. I would say to 
the husband and children, you have lost 
u good wife and mother, whose place can 
never be filled. She leaves several brothers 
and sisters to mourn her loss, we feel our 
loss is her gain. Sleep on dear sister and 
take your rest and may we all strive to 
meet you in a better world. 

Written by her sister and one who lov- 
ed her. 

MRS. J. L. D. CORBETT 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas, it has pleased our heavenly 
Father to call home our beloved Sister Ella 
J. (Garrard) Dixon, who professed a hope 
in Christ and united with the church at 
Eno the third Saturday in July 1880 and 
God saw fit to call her home while sitting 
at the table eating Thanksgiving dinner, 
November 27th, 1930, and was partially 
paralyzed for about four years, therefore 
be it resolved: 

First: The church at Eno has lost a 
faithful member who was always present 
when able to fill her seat. 

Second: We extend our deepest sympa- 
thy to her bereaved children and may God 
bless them and comfort them and letad 
them in the way of truth and love. 

Third: Tha,t a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the Landmark and a copy be 
sent to her children also a copy be put on 
our church book. 

Done by order of conference Saturday, 
before the fourth Sunday in May 1931. 

Charley M. Mayhew, Clerk 
Elder Charles Wood, Moderator 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Whereas through the infinite wisdon 
of our gracious Father. He has seen fit to 
take our much beloved Sister Mary Breeze 
from us on May 3rd, 19 31 who was born 
Nov. 3rd 1860. 

Therefore be it resolved: 

First: That in the death of Sister Breeze 
our church has lost a good sister, and to 
know her was to love her, but, our loss 
to her we believe has brought eternal 
glory. 

Second: That we desire to be in hum- 
ble submission, resigned to the will of our 
Heavenly Father and to extend to the be- 
reaved family our heartfelt sympathy. 

Third: That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the Landmark and a copy to her 
children and also a copy placed on the 
church book. 

Done by order of the church at Eno Sat- 
urday before the fourth Sunday in May 
1931. 

Elder Charles Wood, Moderator 
Charley TT. Mayhew, Clerk 



240 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

Wrereas it has pleased our Heavenly 
Father to call home our beloved Sister 
R. Frances McFarland who professed a 
hope in Christ and united with the church 
at Eno, Saturday before the third Sunday 
in July .1.911, when God saw fit to call 
her home Feb. 16th., 19 31, therefore be 
it resolved. 

First: The church at Eno has lost a 
faithful member when able to fill her 
.seat 

Second: We extend our sympathy to her 
bere»aved chldren and may God bless and 
comfort them and lead them in ways of 
truth and love. 

Third: That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the Landmark and a copy be 
sent to the family and a copy be put on 
our church book. 

Done by order of conference Saturday 
before the fourth Sunday in May 1931. 

Elder Charles Wood, Moderator 
Charley M. Mayhew, Clerk 



RESOLUTION OP RESPECT FOR BRO. 
WILLIAM G. STOKES 

Blessed are the detad that die in the 
Lord, they do rest from their labor and 
their works do follow them. 

Bro. Stokes united with Great Swamp 
church a few weeks before his death, and 
died the 11th. of April, and tho he was 
not baptised we believe he was baptised 
with the Holy Ghost. So we mourn not as 
for one without hope. The church was call- 
ed together at his bedside and he express- 
ed a sweet hope in Christ and a strong de- 
sire to unite with this church. Tho very 
weak he was strong in faith. He bore 
his afflictions with much patience, and 
left evidence sufficient for us to feel that 
he has fallen asleep in Jesus and resting 
in His love. 

Therefore be it resolved: 
First, That we bow in humble submission 
to the will of an all wise God and extend 
to the bereaved family our sympathy, but 
we realize that Jesus is the only source of 
comfort. 

Second, That a copy of the resolutions be 
placed on the church record and a copy 
sent to Zion's Landmark for publication. 

Done by order of the church in confer- 
enc. Saturday before the fourth Sunday in 
April 1931 

S. B. DENNY, Moderator 
LENA HARRINGTON, Clerk. 



PIGG RIVER DISTRICT PRIMITIVE 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

The Pigg River District Primitive Bap- 
tist Association will be held with the 
church at Bell View Roanoke County, Va., 
beginning on Fridr.y before the First Sun- 
day in August, 1931. All lovers of Truth 
are invited. 



Those coming by rail will come to Star 
key, Va., which is two miles from church. 
The church is about 6 miles west of Roa- 
noke, Va. 

Randolph Perdue, Moderator. 



COUNTRY LINE PRIMITIVE 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

The next session of the Lower Country 
Line Primitive Baptist Association will 
convene (D. V.) with the Church at Camp 
Creek, five miles north east of Bahama, 
in Durham County, North Carolina, on 
Saturday before the third Sunday in July 
1C31 and continue three days, (July 18th, 
19th. and 20th.) The churches in this As- 
sociation are all in union and harmony, and 
we extend a cordial invitation to our bre- 
thren and friends, who are in fellowship 
with us, and have no desire to depart from 
"the ancient land marks which our Fath- 
ers have set." 

Those coming by railroad, from the 
FJast, West or South, Via. Durham, will be 
met at Bahama, N. C, on N. W. R. R., on 
Friday P. M. before, at 12:47 and 5:26. 
Those coming from the North, Via. Rox- 
boro, N. C, will be met at the same place 
on Friday P. M., before, at 1:25 and 4:43. 

Those coming by automobile Via. Dur- 
ham or Koxboro, N. C, should come Sat- 
urday morning-, over State Highway No. 
l.>, (from Durham to Roxboro) to Bahama 
road,(neiir Bahama station thence a north 
ea. stern direction Via. Bahama, about sev- 
en miles to place of meeting. 

Stem, N. C, June 1st. 1931, 

J. H. Gooch, Association Clerk 



APPOINTMENTS 

Elder R. W. Rhodes of Louisana, and 
Elder Jonas C. Sikes of Texias will, the 
Lord Willing fill the following appoint- 

Beulah, June 20. Newport June 21. At- 
Irntic at night June 23. Cedar Island June 
24. Newbern at night June 24. Grantsboro 
June 2 5. Sandy GroveJune 2 6. Goose Creek 
27 and 28. Pine Level June 29. Raleigh 
at night June 29. Mebane June 30. Bur- 
lington at night June 30. Bush Arbor July 

1. Spray at night July 1. Macedonia July 

2. Martinsville at night July 2. Old Center 
July 3. Rocky Mount at night July 3. Roa- 
noke Saturday night and Sunday July 4 
and 5. Salem Church July 6. Laurel Creek 
July 7. Floyd Courthouse at night July 7. 
Paynes Creek July 8. Snow Creek July 9. 
Russells Creek 3:30 July 9. Sandy Grove 
July 10. Danville Saturday Night and sec- 
ond Sunday July 11 and 12. 

I hope to be with Elders Sikes and Rho- 
des at most of the above appointments. All 
rppointments will be at eleven o'clock In 
the day, unless otherwise mentioned. 

H. F. Hutchens 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

^^^^^^^^^^ AT - 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIV. JULY 1, 1931 No. 16 



THOU SHALT HAVE NO OTHER GODS BEFORE ME. 

"In the twenty and seventh year of Jeroboam king of Israel began 
Azariah son of Amaziah king of Judah to reign. 

Sixteen years old was he when he began to reign, and he reigned two 
and fifty years in Jerusalem. And his mother's name was Jecholiah of 
Jerusalem. 

And he did that which was right in the sight of the Lord, according to 
all his father Amaziah had done; 

Save that the high places were not removed: the people sacrificed and 
burnt incense still on the high places. 

And the Lord smote the king, so that he was a leper unto the day of 
his death, and dwelt in a several house. 

And Jonathan the king's son was over the house, judging the people of 
the land. 

And the rest of the acts of Azariah, and all that he did are they not 
written in the book of chronicles of the kings of Judah? 

So Azariah slept with his fathers; and they buried him with his fathers 
in the city of David: and Jonathan reigned in his stead." 

— 2 Kings 15:1-11. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 

ELDER JOEL E. MARSHAL Meadows of Dan, Va. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZIO^PS 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

. If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, please inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. 0. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



2)epote& to the dause of ^esus Cbrtst 



ELDER AND MRS. GILBERTS 
GOLDEN WEDDING 
(By M. Whipple Bishop) 

An appropiate tribute to a promi- 
nent Florida couple, who last- week 
observed their Golden Wedding an- 
niversary, was paid by members of 
the family and a host of friends who 
gathered at Dade City last Friday. 

The occasion was the fiftieth an- 
niversary of the union of Elder Mo- 
zelle L. and Gency Redwine Gilbert. 
Present on the beautiful occasion 
were four sons and their wives, four 
(laughters and their husbands, 19 
grandchildren many other relatives 
and scores of friends and admirers. 

Eight sons and daughters of the 
beloved couple were: Jermai (Mrs. 
Carlos C.) Hamilton, Jacksonville; 
Wendell Vernon Gilbert, Dade City; 
Lester Gold Gilbert, Jacksonville; 
Clifford Orville Gilbert Dade City; 
Crome Casey Gilbert, Miami; Grace 
(Mrs. C. H. Smith) Wauchula; An- 
\iie Gency (Mrs. Robert C.) Millar 
Jacksonville, and Mary Jane Ruth 
(Mrs. Aborn H.) Smith Jr. Orlando. 

The family residence, for many 
yeai\s a center of hospitality and ac- 
customed to holding large assem- 
blages of the members and friends 
of this family wittnessed another 
day of great interest and activity. 
Breakfast was served to 45 at 8;15 
A. M., all the family were there and 
a few relatives and close friends. 

As the guests were received at the 
residence throughout the day, 
orange punch was served on the 
front verandah, and orange iced 



cake wedding served in the dining 
room. In the parlor they were re- 
quested to register in a Golden 
Bride's Book, using gold ink. 

Just prior to the high-noon lunch- 
eon, a miniature wedding was held 
m the parlor at the residence. Under 
a golden bell in an arch, before an 
improvised altar flanked with gol- 
den tapers, grandchildren re-enact- 
ed the ceremony of fifty years ago. 

The minister was Lester Gilbert 
IL Geraldine Gilbert of Miami and 
Gilbert Smith of Waushula were the 
bride and bridegroom, respectfully. 
Charles Gilbert of Dade City was 
the best man and Janet Millar of 
Jacksonville was the flower girl. 
Bridesmaids included Lucille Gil- 
bert, Jaunita Gilbert, Dade City; 
Clarice Gilbert, Dade City, and Vir- 
ginia Ruth Smith of Wauchula. 

Mrs. Orville Dayton played the 
wedding march and recessional, 
with Annetta Hamilton playing the 
violin obligato. During the recep- 
tion, which followed, a quartette of 
older grandchildren, including Rex 
Gilbert, tenor, Edwin Hamilton, so- 
prano. Zelma Lois Gilbert, contral- 
to, and Woodrow Gilbert, bass, sang 
"My Old Kentucky Home," "When 
You and I Were Young 'Gency' " 
and other selections. 

The Primitive Baptist Church, in 
which Elder Gilbert has preached 
for many years, was beautifully dec- 
orated for the anniversary lunch 
eon; the pulpit was banked with 
palmetto leaves and tall bamboo 
placed in the corners. Snowy cov- 



242 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ered tables were centered with fern 
and Shasta daisies filled the church 
auditorium, and additional tables 
were provided under the shady oak 
trees in the yard between the 
church and residence for those 
guests who could not find place 
within. At each place was found a 
container, gold covered, filled with 
salted nuts and mints. 

Head table across in front of the 
pulpit, centered by a three-tier, gol- 
den iced cake, v. ith tiny bride and 
groom under a wedding bell atop. 
At this table were only the honor 
couple, sons and their wives, dau- 
ghters and their husbands. After a 
beautifully worded and appropiate 
invocation by Elder Gilbert a course 
luncheon was served (Marsh's Cafe, 
caterer) . Toastmaster Lester Gilbert 
first requested Mother Gilbert to 
cut the wedding cake in front of her 
and after this very important cere- 
mony had been skilfully performed 
by the bride, the oldest son, Wen- 
dell Vernon Gilbert, as tlie Toast to 
Mother, recited the poem, "Wonder- 
ful Mother of Mine," and eulogized 
mother love. 

A toast to grandmother was of- 
fered by Woodrow W. Gilbei-t, eld- 
est son of the eldest son, who using 
both verse and prose, expressed 
gratitude to Mother Gilbert for her 
example of service to others and the 
happiness of a long married life. 

Mother Gilbert responded, saying 
her children and grandchildren 
mean more to her than fame or mon- 
ey, and arc a source of great pleas- 
ure and comfort; and she expressed 
the hope 1hat Ihey might enjoy as 
many ycr of marital bliss as had 
she and her husband. 

After a violin solo by Miss Anneta 
Hamilton, a granddaughter, the 
toastmaster introduced George A. 
(Scotty) Trumbull of this city, who, 



without instrumental accompani- 
ment, sang "Mother Machree" in a 
most pleasing manner, which num- 
ber the toastmaster announced was 
dedicated jointly to Mr. Trumbull's 
mother in Leith, Scotland, and to 
mother Gilbert. 

Mrs. Jermai Hamilton, as the eld- 
est daughter, then paid tribute to 
her father, his upright and honor- 
able life and devotion to his calling 
ever being an example to his de- 
scendants and an inspiration to all 
who know him. 

Annetta Hamilton, as the eldest 
daughter, voiced the feeling of all 
the grandchildren, that Mozelle Gil- 
bert is their ideal and the perfect 
grandfather such as any child would 
want to have. She concluded by 
playing (La Cinquamain the Gol- 
den Wedding), by Gabriel Marie, 
upon the violin. 

In responding to these toasts. Eld- 
er Gilbert said he felt very grate- 
ful and happy on this occasion to 
have found grace in the hearts of 
so many people and to have a test- 
imonial of their affection as was 
evidenced by the large number who 
attended the anniversary luncheon 
or who had sent their congratula- 
tions. He expressed thanks for the 
companionship of "the best woman 
in the world," and for the good 
health enjoyed by both of them and 
by all their children and grand- 
children. 

Mrs. Lester Gilbert recited a par- 
ticularly appropriate set of verses 
entitled "Companionship," after 
which the remaining sons and 
daughters, with their wives and 
husbands, were introduced by the 
toastmaster, as were several other 
relatives, one cousin., Mrs. Myrtle 
Dishman Fortson, after suitable 
verse, presenting Mother Gilbert 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



243 



with an arm bouquet of golden col- 
ored rose buds. 

Ministers of other churches in 
Dade City, merchants, public offic- 
ials, friends of many years, who 
made short addresses in response 
to the toastmaster's invitation, all 
expressed the highest regard for 
Elder and Mrs. Mozelle Gilbert, 
their personal influence and service 
to the community and State, which 
they have helped build during their 
half century of residence in Pasco 
County and Dade City, to their ster- 
ling and unblemished characters 
their gratification at having been 
privileged to know and be associat- 
ed with them and their family. 
Among those so responding were 
Congressman Herbert J. Drane, 
Mayor Younger O'Neal of Dade 
City, Dr. and Mrs. Russell H. Dean, 
and M. Whipple Bishop of Jack- 
sonville, Elder E. J. Devane who 
has performed the marriage cere- 
mony for all the Gilbert children. 
State Senator Auvil, Cook Lee, Mrs. 
Annie Huckaby, Jesse Roberts, and 
others who had known the Gilberts 
since or before they moved from 
Kentucky to settle in Florida, Col. 
and Mrs. Jeff Henley, George Gil- 
bert, Arch Burnside, George Day- 
ton, the Rev. James of the Baptist 
and the Rev. Latham of the Presby- 
terian Church, Jasper Carter, Wil- 
liam Friedman. Benediction by El- 
der Gilbert. 

Letters and telegrams from hun- 
dreds of friends were received dur- 
ing the day, including congratula- 
tPons and good wishes from Senator 
Duncan U. Fletcher, Senator Park 
Trammell, Governor Doyle E. Carl- 
ton, Mr. and Mrs. John S. B. Moyer, 
Merrill G. Shiveley, Warren Hill, 
Bob Steckert. 

Beautiful and costly gifts testi- 



fied to the love and affection borne 
to the Gilbert family by many 
friends. The golden motif was evi- 
dent in them all, including embroid- 
ered linens, luncheon sets, crystal 
ware, bedspreads, rugs, pitchers, 
cups, spoons, plates, and approx- 
imately $460 in gold pieces, and a 
score of cakes, some of which bore 
the names and dates, "Mozelle and 
Gency Gilbert, 1881-1981," in frost- 
ing. Attending the celebration 
from Jacksonville were: Mr. and 
Mrs. Carlos C. Hamilton, Misses 
Annetta and Edwina Hamilton, Mr. 
and Mrs. Lester Gold Gilbert, and 
her sisters, Misses Jennie and Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert C. Millar, little 
Robert Pearl Blanton and Janet 
Millar, George A. Turnbull, M. 
Whipple Bishop, Dr. and Mrs. Rus- 
sell H. Dean. 



JESUS MY SAVIOR 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Gooch, 

Stem, North Carolina. 

Dear Brother and Sister Gooch ; 

After the service Sunday and ev- 
ery day since, I have had a mind to 
write you and Brother Gooch and 
tell you of my joy, I hope in the 
Lord, for I have had a season of re- 
joicing and praising His Holy name 
for His wonderful mercies to me 
never before experienced. 

Although more than twenty years 
have passed since I first was made 
to feel that Jesus is my Savior, I 
have felt until a few weeks ago that 
I was shut up as one in the clefts of 
the Rock and could not come forth. 
I have often felt that I was in prison 
as. Paul and Silas and have prayed 
and sung praises to God with a long- 
ing for the prison doors to open that 
I might come forth and tell others 
of the goodness and mercy of the 
Lord to me a poor sinner. It was in 



244 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Elder Ashburn's time when he 
preached from this text that I felt 
he was directing his sermon to me 
and oh the suffering and longing de- 
sire within me that the prison doors 
might be thrown open to me that I 
might go forward and tell the 
church of my feelings. He used to 
ask me to visit him in his home, but 
1 felt so unworthy and for fear he 
would talk to me about the Lord's 
dealings with me, for I felt he knew 
about them, I would not go. 

It was about six weeks ago that I 
told Brother Teague what I felt was 
some of the dealings of the Lord 
with m :. He asked me if I had a de- 
sire to unite with the Church. I told 
him I had seen many a time when 
I felt I must go or must see him or 
some other and talk about the good- 
}iess oi the Lord to me and my total 
depravity. A few days before the 
f\r< Sunday in March, v/hich was 
after my talk with Brother Teague 
I had a dream or vision that; 

I was travelling in Palestine. I 
was sitting at a table with several 
friends eating, drinking and having 
a good time, and got up from the 
table and left them and walked a- 
lone into Jerusalem. There I wentin- 
to a building. I saw no one at first 
but after looking around 1 saw com- 
ing up a stairway from below a 
tough looking character dressed in 
dark uniform. When he reached the 
head of the steps on the main floor 
he suddenly stopped and stared at 
me as if to say: "What are you do- 
ing here". Neither of us spoke. I de- 
cided to go back to my friends. Af- 
ter getting out from the city on a 
hill I stopped and saw many roads 
leading from me beyond in several 
directions. I felt that to take any of 
them I would not find my friends 
and they would not find me and that 
I would be lost and fall into the 



hands of the natives. So I decided 
I would go back to Jerusalem and 
spend the night. I went into the 
same building. I was met by a young 
woman dressed in snow white. Al- 
though she was not of my nation- 
ality, being from the South of my 
country, she could speak my lan- 
guage. This made me happy, I first 
told her that I wanted to spend the 
night and she was very friendly and 
showed me a registration book with 
several names on the page. I then 
told her that I wanted to see the 
American Legation, then I said no, 
the Consul. She said his office was 
down stairs, but it was five o'clock 
in the evening and he was not in. 
I then turned and went into the 
main part of the building (for my 
conversation with her was in the 
lobby) and I saw Bro. Teague com- 
ing toward me with outstretched 
arm to shake hands with me. Here 
the dream ended. 

On Sunday following I went to 
church a;id when the invitation was 
given I was cold and hard hearted. 
When I returned home I remember- 
ed that my dream ended before Bro- 
ther Teague reached me with his 
hand extended. I was so anxious to 
see him and tell him my dream and 
did a few days later. He told me 
that it was a good dream and asked 
again if I did not want to join the 
church. My answer was "yes". After 
that time I felt I could not live in 
peace outside. So Saturday evening 
I left my work and walked to church 
not knowing what I would do. My 
very breathings were a prayer for 
the Lord to so direct me to offer. 
Brother Teague asked me to select 
a hymn. I did "Rock of Ages" be- 
cause the stanza; 

"Nothing in my hand I bring 
Simply to thy Cross I cling, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



245 



Naked come to thee for dress; 
Helpless look to thee for grace; 
Back I to the fountain fly 
Wash me Savior or I die." 

fit my case. But I couldn't join in 
because of tears. After the sermon 
by Elder Denny and the conference 
the invitation was given and I went 
forward with fear and trembling. 
I felt so unworthy that I did not 
know whether I would be accepted. 
I was received and on Sunday morn- 
ing after prayer by Elder Fagg was 
baptized by Elder Denny, I told my 
feelings Sunday, and so stated to 
Elder Denny, that surely it must be 
the Lord for there was no earthly 
reason for his bautizing me. Afetr 
the service Sister Smith told me that 
she dreamed a few weeks ago that 
I joined the church. 

Since then the Bible and "Frag- 
ments" by Elder Silas Durand, 
which you so kindly gave me a few 
years ago I have read every day. 
These books though read many 
times before, have been so sweet to 
me and now, with an understanding 
as never before that I was led to 
look up 2nd. Corinthians 5:17- 
"Therefore if any man be in Christ, 
he is a new creature; old things are 
passed away; behold all things are 
become new". Sunday morning I op- 
ened my Bible and read the book 
of James. I have been rejoicing in 
spirit and praising God and desir- 
ing the association of God's people 
more than ever before. 

Your letter which has been read 
several times by me makes me shed 
tears and offer praise to God. I hum- 
bly hope that the Lord will so bless 
me as to live in sweet fellowship 
and remain as a little one among 
good people, and to ever praise His 



glorious name for His wonderful 
mercies to me my remaining days 
on earth. 

The blessing I have now received 
of joining in the bonds of Christian 
fellowship with God's people here 
on earth, I longed for more than 20 
years and I have been made to feel 
that it was God's appointed time- 
not my own. That it was within me 
to go to church earlier or put it off. 
It was when I received the sweet 
command that I was so weak and 
helpless and surrendered all. "Noth- 
ing in my hand I bring, simply to 
thy Cross I cling". God's ways are 
wonderful and past finding out. 

I shall never forget my conver- 
sation with Brother Gooch on the 
porch the evening we visited in your 
home a few years ago ; his talking 
of the doctrine of our Lord and Sav- 
ior Jesus Christ. I was "shut up" 
and could not tell him of the Lord's 
dealings with me. Now I want to in 
tenderness and as a little child tell 
every one. But I am made to feel 
that only God's people are interest- 
ed or can understand. 

I would like to accept your invi- 
tation to visit your May meeting. 
Our communion is here at that time 
and will wait until your Association 
and visit you then, if it is the Lord's 
will. 

Come to see me the next time you 
come to Winston-Salem. 

Your Brother, I hope 
B. C. CLINARD 



DONATION FROM G. E. COL- 
BOUR, CAPE CHARLES, VA. 

J. W. Stephenson, Coats $1.00 
Noah P. Spangler, Cascade , Va., 

Route 2 $1.00 

Mrs. C. S. Flynn, General Delivery 
Washington, N. C $1.00 



246 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



EXPERIENCE 

Coats, N. C. 
June 17, 1931 
Elder O. J. Denny, 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Dear Brother., 

We are enclosing letter received 
from Sister Elgie Williams, we feel 
it so rich that others would like to 
read it, and am sending it to you 
to publish in the Landmark if you 
see fit. 

Unworthily, in hope, 
MR. AND MRS. J. C. LANGDON. 



The Letter 

Dear precious Brother and Sister, 
in hope of a home beyond this veil 
of tears : 

This lonely Sabbath day as I am 
at home, it is on my mind, for some 
cause I know not, what, to write 
you some of my feelings today; and 
the cause I hope, why I was made 
willing for my name to appear be- 
fore the public in the columns of 
the dear Landmark, to be seen and 
read by my dear kindred in the 
Lord I hope. 

Dear ones; I want to ask you if 
I ever should write anything to 
wound or jhurt your feelings, be 
frank enough with me to let me 
know it. I feel that 1 would gladly 
get down at your feet and ask for- 
giveness. My daily prayer is: "Lord 
keep me at the feet of my brethren 
and sisters. Lord lay me low, and 
keep me there." 

A short while after I was receiv- 
ed into the church at Fellowship, 
an impression came upon my mind, 
and these words were continually 
ringing in my very heart: "Comfort 
my people, wherewith the comfort 
thou hast been comforted with." I 
tried with all the power I possessed 
to lay it aside, but soon found I 



could not. I could not sleep, I would 
plead and cry. I felt there were so 
many of the Household of Faith, 
much more capable, better educa- 
ted, had so much more knowledge 
of the scriptures, and Heavenly and 
Divine things, than I had. Then the 
thought came to my mind that if I 
would write to some of the breth- 
ren and sisters, that maybe this im- 
pression to write for publication 
would leave me. I tried this, but 
still this did not fully relieve my 
mind and burdened heart, although 
I received lots of comfort from writ- 
ing to them, and receiving their 
good letters. While thus being 
tossed about in mind, trying to rid 
myself of this burden, in my feeble 
way one night I tried to ask the 
Lord if it was his will to relieve me 
of this burden, not my will but thine 
be done. In my sleep I was placed 
in a large field. The field was full of 
pens with sheep in each pen, I was 
walking from pen to pen lookng 
at them. They were bleating and 
seemed to be hungry. A woman ap- 
peared before me with something 
in her arms, it looked like dried lea- 
ves and grass, ground and pressed, 
and in blocks about six inches 
square. She handed me one of the 
bundles and said. "Take this and 
feed these sheep." I told her that 
was not the kind of food that sheep 
liked. She said. "It is. You take it, 
and feed them, and watch them 
grow." I did as she asked me to. 
I would break off just a small piece 
at the time, they ate it and seemed 
to be satisfied and contented, and 
dear ones, I believe I received as 
much joy and comfort in feeding 
those sheep as any one thing I ever 
did in my life. But yet, I was rebel- 
lious, and gave way to this old sinful 
flesh, let Satan rule, did not have 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



247 



power to say as the dear Savior did, 
get thee hence behind me Satan, 
and it seems that I was given over 
to him to be tempted and tormented 
and for about two weeks I stayed 
in this condition. It seemed the Lord 
had withdrawn his presence from 
me forever, that I was forsaken, 
cast down with not a friend in the 
wide world. I felt that I was deceiv- 
ed and had deceived you good peo- 
ple, and surely the next meeting 
day I would tell you all to take my 
name off the church book. My very 
breathing was in supplication to the 
Lord, and if it was His will for me 
to write anything for the Land- 
mark, to remove this burden, and 
give me renewed evidence. I went 
to sleep in this condition, and was 
asked this question. Is thy God 
whom thou hast worshipped, able 
to deliver you out of our hands? My 
answer was my God is able to de- 
liver me out of thy hands, and when 
I spoke these words I was placed 
in one of the most beautiful gar- 
den of flowers, all the same size 
and the head of each flower was 
bowed. The rows of flowers, and the 
space between them were all the 
same width. The walk between the 
flowers was of pure white marble. 
A little gold book was placed in 
my hands, and these words were 
spoken to me — Take this book and 
go back to yonder world and com- 
fort my people. 

Dear ones I feel this is too great 
task for such a poor, ignorant, sin- 
ful and unworthy worm of the dust 
as I feel to be. I oftimes feel that 
it is only of the flesh, and I can't 
write anything that will be com- 
forting to God's humble poor. I have 
been beaten with many stripes for 
my disobedience but when I am 
brought to the place that I am will- 



ing to write then I can lay down at 
night and rest, and go on with my 
work with ease. Dear brother and 
sister it may sound strange to you, 
but I have received as much com- 
fort, joy and ease of mind in writ- 
ing, as I have when hearing and 
feasting on good preaching. Some- 
times I can say I am not ashamed 
to own my Lord or to defend his 
cause. And at other times oh, I feel 
so unworthy, and fear I am not one 
of the elect. I feel like it is a fear- 
ful thing to fall into the hands of 
the living God. Oh, that I could only 
do or say something that would 
cause God's dear children to walk 
close together and stay at each 
others feet, and live and dwell in un- 
ity. If we could always remember 
that we are nothing, just poor weak 
creatures, stumbling along, subject 
to many mistakes, for there is none 
perfect no not one. Then why not 
help each other along by bearing 
one another's burdens? It is possi- 
ble that their burden could be great- 
er than ours. 

When it is necessary to rebuke 
a brother or sister, do it with love 
and kind words. May the Lord be 
merciful to us and help us to forgive 
and forget each others short com- 
ings. Lay down the old weapon of 
hate, envy, jealousy and pride, take 
up the cross and follow His darling 
Son, who shed his precious blood 
that his people might live . 

There are times I am made to 
wonder if I am one of them, did he 
shed just one drop of that precious 
blood for me? It gives me comfort 
to feel and hope that I have tasted 
the goodness and mercy of our 
great Redeemer. Oh, the people of 
God! How they are scorned and 
stoned. But are we any better than 
Christ? He was put to death, and 



248 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



if it were in the power of our ene- 
mies we would be put to death. 

Dear ones I reckon you think I'm 
not going to stop, but feel that I 
cannot until I fully relieve my mind. 

For the last three nights dear sis- 
ter I have viewed you and and my- 
self leaning against a great huge 
rock, and I thought you said, "We 
are devoted to each other so much." 
If you will accept my views and 
weak way of understanding — I feel 
that it represents Christ, and the 
great love I hope I have, we have 
for each other. My heart was filled 
with love for I want to be shelter- 
ed by the Rock that is higher than 
I. Oh, that love I have for God's 
people, I can't express it. The love 
of Christ is the love I desire in my 
heart. O for a closer walk with God. 
O happy daywhen free from sin and 
all my toils and cares shall end. 
Jesus, keep me ever near thy side. 
When my knees are down in prayer 
Oh, meet me there and thy spirit 
ever sweet. I hope to be among that 
happy host with all the redeemed, 
behold Him face to face to go out 
no more forever. 

I leave this for your considera- 
tion. May God's richest blessings 
rest upon you and your family. 

In love and sweet fellowship. 

ELGIE LEE WILLIAMS 
Garner, N. C. 



PROPHESY UNTO US. 

By referrin to Math. 26:68 verse 
we may find this language, on the 
statement at the head of this short 
letter. There is an old saying that 
we may lead a horse to water, but 
we can't make him drink. 

They blindfolded him, but they 
could not put out his eyes. See Luke 
22:64, and even if they had put 
out his eyes he would have been as 



Sampson was. "Though blind, his 
strength was increased with his 
bodily infirmities. 

They were the blind ones had 
they known it. He was blindfolded 
by the blind. His knowledge of their 
condition was the same when blind 
folded. All they did to him, from 
an evil motive, was only fuUfilling 
the scriptures concerning him. 

The fact that he was shamefully 
treated and required by them to do 
certain things, and make it clearer 
and clearer that he was the Son of 
God. 

Leaving him, we come to his min- 
isters, and they need not marvel if 
the world hates them as it did him, 
and we are sure that the servant 
of, the Lord is no better to suffer 
these shameful things than, their 
Master was. 

"Prophesy unto us," may be said 
to them, just as it was said to him, 
but they know it is not them that 
speak, but the "Holy Ghost." 

He realized that there was a 
time to speak, and a time to hold 
his peace, and so do his ministers, 
and though it is said to them, speak, 
they remember the saying of Peter, 
"is it right to obey God rather than 
man, judge ye." 

"Prophesy unto us," but he at 
that time was led as a "sheep to 
the slaughter, and as a lamb before 
his shearer was dumb, so opened he 
not his mouth. Had he have pro- 
claimed unto them it would have 
been as blasphemy to them, for he 
would have spoken in the spirit of 
the Father, for he said, "the spirit 
of the Lord God is upon me, for he 
has anointed me to preach good 
tidings to the meek, and not one of 
his persecutors at this time was 
such in feelings or experience. 

"Prophesy unto us," was uttered 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



249 



by such as felt that he would obey 
them, but he "assured them not a 
word." 

No prophet was more ready to 
speak, and hold not his peace than 
he, but he did not prophesy when 
he knew that those at that time who 
required such, "were enemies of 
the Cross of Christ." "Answereth 
them nothing" said Caiaphas, the 
high priest? And here we see his 
wisdom, for speaking was not ex- 
pedient upon the questions then 
asked. Things they should know, he 
would not answer. Ever learning, 
and never able to come to the know- 
ledge of the truth were they. "Pro- 
phesy unto us," but they desired to 
catch him in his words, and present 
unto their king a falsehood not be- 
lieveable in any court. 

There is a time and purpose to 
everything under the sun. 

J. T. SATTERWHITE 

June 21, 1931. 



MRS. FLYNN ACKNOWLEDGES 
MONEY 

P. D. Gold Publishing Co., 
Wilson, N. C, 
Mr. Join D. Gold, 
Dear Sir: 

I wish to acknowledge through 
the Landmark the names and a- 
mount eeach contributed to me up 
to the present, so I am enclosing 
list of names of those sent checks 
to me and also those sent through 



the Landmark. 

Hattie Bean $1.00 

Bettie G. Everett & Joe Britt $2.50 

Alma Hall Brooks $2.50 

A Friend $10.00 

Mrs. Georgia Partlow $2.50 

Mrs. Martha N. Walton $2.00 

J. H. Balance $5.00 

MRS. C. S. FLYNN 



Washington, N. C. 



LIKES THE LANDMARK 

Dear Brother Denny, 

Enclosed please find $2.00 to re- 
new my subscription to the Land- 
mark for another year, which ex- 
pired in October I think. I don't 
wish to get behind because I enjoy 
reading it so much and too it is the 
duty of every subscriber to pay as 
early as possible. 

I am also enclosing another piece 
you may publish if you think it 
worthy of space, hoping it is all in 
accord with the truth. If I have said 
anything that will comfort anyone 
give all the honor and praise to God, 
for I am not capable of doing any- 
thing good unless aided by the God 
of all mercy. 

Love, 
ANNIE HOOKS., 
Fremont, N. C. 



My mind tonight is very much 
centered on the scriptures on the 
great and marvelous works of God 
our Savior. And notwithstanding my 
inability to tell of the glorious lib- 
erties that the child of God is bless- 
ed to pass through all the sufferings 
conflicts and woe, I will attempt to 
give a portion of them. What a won- 
der of wonders that Jesus should 
suffer bleed and die for poor weary 
tempest tossed souls that have come 
to the end of their strength, and 
who has trampled God's mercies 
under their feet all the days of 
their life. Oh, what a blessed priv- 
ilege, after having been condemned 
to die, feeling to be banished from 
the presence of the Lord forever, 
knowing that we are ten thousand 
talents in debt and not a farthing 
to pay. This is a needy time, a time 
when such characters will fall on 
their feet and sue for mercy, "a 
crumb of mercy Lord I crave." Such 



250 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



characters will begin to say with 
the Poet, "Approach my soul the 
mercy seat, where Jesus answers 
prayer," It matters not how unwor- 
thy we feel or how great our trans- 
gressions might be, the Lord is able 
to forgive them all, what a glorious 
privilege when burdened down be- 
neath a load of care, to be blessed 
with the spirit of prayer. Then it is 
when Jesus instantly comes to us 
and revives our courage by the way. 
It is there and then only that we are 
made to go on our way feeling that 
weary stumbling stone has been re- 
moved and we are once again made 
to feel that our Redeemer lives. No 
wonder that the poet could say 
what a comfort this sweet sentence 
gives, "I know that my Redeemer 
lives." I believe that every child 
of God has seasons of sorrows and 
murmuring and also seasons of joy 
and praising. Sometimes it seems 
that every thing is against us and 
when it does we begin to complain 
and say our way .is harder than 
others. I have more conflicts and 
woe than anyone else, and when I 
do them all at once all the blessings 
that I have ever had begin rolling up 
before me with such force that I 
am made to be ashamed of myself 
for being so unthankful. All of my 
sins come up before me and I feel 
that I get far better than I have 
ever deserved. The greatest bless- 
ing that has ever been my portion 
to enjoy is the blessed sweet hope 
that I have of a resting place be- 
yond this world of sorrow and suf- 
fering and to my mind this glorious 
hope is the most precious treasure 
that any mortal soul could ever 
have, for without it or without the 
presence of God, nothing is of any 
comfort to one that has been called 
ont of the darkness into the light. 



One of the greatest evidences we 
have that we are a child of God is 
this "we know we have passed from 
death unto life because we love the 
brethren. If I am not badly deceived 
I love the doctrine salvation by 
grace more than anything and all 
things combined. It is the surest and 
only way by which mortal man 
must be saved. I can say of a truth 
that it is by the grace of God that I 
am what I am. I feel to say tonight 
that all the praise and glory be to 
God for my change if indeed I have 
been changed and I hope that I 
have. There is one thing that I do 
know that I love the brethren and 
I now love the things that I once 
hated and hate the things that I 
once loved. In other words I love 
right and hate wrong, yet I persist 
in it. So my sincere prayer to God 
is that I might be given sufficient 
strength to walk according to what 
I hope my charge has been. I am 
praying that my future days my be 
my best days, and that they may be 
spent walking in the straight and 
narrow way, with all meekness and 
lowliness of heart. Oh, that I might 
be patient and calm, loving and du- 
tiful in every instance is my constant 
desire. Hence I am made to feel as 
the poet did when he said, now my 
remnant of day be spent to his 
praise, who hath my poor soul re- 
deemed, whether many or few all 
my years are his due. 

Hoping all that has been said a- 
miss will be forgiven and let this 
truth within us live. 

A little sister I hope. 

ANNIE HOOKS 
Fremont, N. C. 



.Inst I{«<<M\o(l a shipment of 
M,(>M) MV.MN HOOKS 
S. 11. Di'iujy, Wilson, X. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



251 



WILL GIVE $5.00 IF NECESSTRY 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Wilson, N. C, 
Dear Sir; 

Enclosed find check for seven dol- 
lars $2.00 for subscription from 
July 15, 1931 to 1932. My P. O. ad- 
dress same as heretofore. You will 
give the other five dollars to Mrs. 
C. S. Flynn, Washington, N. C. If 
they fail to get enough to pay mort- 
gage off house I'll pay five more if 
that vi^ill clear it. 

Yours truly, 
J. H. BALANCE 
Dunn, N. C. 



SENDS $10.00 FOR MRS. FLYNN. 

We w^ish to acknowledge through 
the Landmark a check of $10.00 for 
Mrs. C. S. Flynn, General Delivery 
Washington, N. C, from a subscrib- 
er's husband in Roanoke, Va., who 
wishes his name given as "a friend" 

As stated before in the last issue 
of the Landmark we are willing to 
be one of 20 to give $5.00 to pay the 
mortgage off of her home. 

J. D. GOLD. 



CAN'T DO WITHOUT 
LANDMARK 

Mr J. D. Gold, 
Wilson, N. C, 
Dear Sir: 

You will please find enclosed or- 
der for $2.00 for the Landmark, 
which will pay it up to January 
1932. I sure don't feel like I could 
do without it as I have been read- 
ing it 40 years and get lots of com- 
fort from its pages. Hoping you will 
have many more years to continue 
the paper as you have in the past 
is my prayer. As ever yours, 

LOUISA R. LANGDON 
Four Oaks, N, C, R. 4, Box 14. 



LANDMARK A PEACE MAKER 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Wilson, N. C, 

I appreciate you reminding me 
my time is out for the Landmark, 
tho' sorry I have been so negligent 
that you had to do so, for 1 realize 
this is both trouble and expense to 
you. However, it slipped my mind 
this time. I will endeavor to watch 
the date on the Landmark in the 
future, and try to be more prompt 
in sending in my renewal for we do 
enjoy reading the Landmark very 
much. It is clear of arguments and 
controversies. No fighting each 
other, but works for peace and the 
upbuilding of God's Kingdom here 
below. 

Thanking you again for your 
kindness and trusting you may be 
spared and blessed many years yet 
to publish this dear paper, I remain. 

Your unworthy brother in the 
hope of eternal life. 

J. E. JONES 
Largo, Florida. 



DONATIONS 

Mrs. Martha N. Walton of New 
Bern, N. C, sends $2.00 each for 
Mrs. C. S. Flynn of Washington and 
W. J. Stephenson of Coates, N, C. 



READING LANDMARK SIXTY 
YEARS. 

I have been reading the Land- 
mark for something like sixty years 
now. I am seventy-five today and 
I am not able to work. I am not 
able to go to church only when I 
can get some one to carry me and 
that is not often. I have not been 
to church but once this year. 

Wishing you much success, I am, 
Yours lovingly, 
S. A. Goolsby 

Stokesdale, N. C. 



252 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Zion's Landmark 



"Remove not the ancient Landmark'- 
which thy fathers have set." 

Editor 

Elder O. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 

N. C. , 

Associate Editors 
bolder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 

Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. No. 16 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C. JULY, 1, 1931 



THE RESURRECTION. 

Since becoming associated with 
Zion's Landmark, I have had quite 
a number of r(^quests, that I write 
on the resurrection. 

I have so often referred to the 
conviction, conversion, travail, de- 
liverances, preservation, resurrec- 
tion, ascension and eternal glorifi- 
cation of the people of God, (sin- 
ners saved) uf every nation, kin- 
dred, tongue and people, who have 
or will have washed robes, made 
white, pure and clean by the wash- 
ing of regeneration, the full, free 
Knd effectual work of Christ, 
through His blood and righteous- 
ness, that I feel anything I might 
say will be a repetition, and maybe 
a vain repetition of what has al- 
. ready, so often, been said. 

The resurrection of the dead is 
very clearly taught in both the Old 



and New Testament scriptures. See 
Job 19 ch. verses 25-26-27. John 
5:28-29, John 12:24, John 14:19, 
Matt. 25:52-53, 1st. Cor. 15:14-20 
and 36, Acts 13:33, Romans 4:25. 
These and many other scriptures 
treat on the subject of the resurrec- 
tion. 

As to the teaching of the Saddu- 
cees, who did not believe in the 
resurrection of the body from a car- 
nal to a spiritual, and eternal state 
of life and immortality. Read 
Mark 12:18-23, Acts 22:8, 1st Cor. 
15:12, Luke 20:33 and other scrip- 
tures touching on the subject. 

Jesus said, "Because I live, ye 
shall live also," John 14:19. He is 
called "the first fruits of them that 
slept." 1st Cor. 15:20. 

Paul said, "If Christ be not risen, 
(risen from the dead) risen from 
the sepulchre, "then is your preach- 
ing in vain and your faith also is 
vain." 

Who doubts the resurrection of 
Jesus? Is He not, then, all things 
to the church, the body of Christ. 
He said, "I am the resurrection and 
the life, whosoever believeth in me 
though he were dead, yet shall he 
live, and whosoever liveth and be- 
lieveth in me shall never die." 

He did not have in mind that cor- 
poral death or the dissolution of our 
bodies would not take place, if we 
were believers in him; but looking 
beyond death, and the grave, he 
thus treated death as a falling 
asleep, to be awakened in God's 
own time, and by His miraculous 
power, to be presented without spot, 
wrinkle or any such deformity ; and 
we are told that it doth yet appear 
what we shall be, but when we 
shall see Him we shall be like Him 
(in perfection, glorified) and be 
satisfied. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



253 



"He, Christ, was delivered for 
our offenses." Delivered even un- 
to death, yet he knew no sin, or did 
not sin; but became our sin bearer, 
suffered and died in our stead, thus 
He, the innocent one, the sinless 
one, bore the cross alone. He alone 
could shed innocent blood, and we, 
represented by Barabbus, the great 
sinner, justly condemned and under 
the death sentence of death, was set 
free. Free not only from the power 
of sin to bring again into condem- 
nation before God, but free from 
the power of death and the grave, 
hence the apostle says, "O death 
where is thy sting? O, grave, 
where is thy victory?" 

"The sting of death is sin, the 
strength of sin is the law; but 
thanks be to God who giveth us the 
victory, through our Lord Jesus 
Christ." 

He was not only delivered unto 
death for our offenses; but. He 
arose (from death and the grave) 
for our justification." How much 
of our justification, spiritual life 
and liberty is of Him? All of it. 
No wonder then, we read, "Though 
your sins be as scarlet, they shall be 
as wool, though they be red like 
crimson, they shall be white as 
snow," or that we read "No weapon, 
that is formed against thee shall 
prosper and every tongue that shall 
rise against thee, thou shall con- 
demn, this is the heritage of the 
saints, and their righteousness is of 
me saith the Lord." 

Peter and John were imprisoned 
for preaching the resurrection of 
the dead, and if there be those who 
do not agree with us, we seek no 
quarrel; but commend all such to a 
careful searching of the scriptures. 

If it is desired, would be glad, at 
some future time, to look into the 



subject more fully, and can, if need 
be, give the beliefs and teachings of 
some of the outstanding ministers 
of the past; but hope this will suf- 
fice for the present. 

Yours in hope, 
O. J. DENNY, 



C. T. WILLIFORD 

In memory of our husband and father 
Charles Thaddeus Williford who was 
born in 1873 and died June 4, 1930. 
Ju&t one year ago tod.iy 
God saw fit to take you av/ay 
To a better home above 
Where all is joy, peace, -and love. 

A kind hushand and father is gone 
A voice we loved is "stilled" 
There's a vacancy in our home 
That never can be filled. 

We cannot hear your foot-step 
Nor meet you at the door 
You have gone away and left 
To return to us no more. 

We could not keep death away 
Our prayers were all in vain 
The angels came and took you 
Out of your suffering anci pain 

You were so kind and gentle 
Never angry or cross 
Your dceth to us means 
An irreparable loss. 

AVe hope to meet in that bright world 
Upon t>.at heavenly shore 
There to join in praises 
Where parting is no more. 

II si'ems so hard to give you up 
But when Jesus speaks, it's done 
Po he has railed jou away 
And left us all alone. 

You heard death's r.ucel calling 
You said it would l)e one hour more 
Then It would all be finished 
And that your suffering here would be 
o'er. 

Cease then, fond nature, cease thy tears 
The Savior dwells on hi.ah 
There everlasting spring appears 
There joy shall never die. 

Let us be weaned from all l elow 
Let hope and grief expel 
While death invites our soul to go 
Wliere our best kind dwell. . 

All yonr suffering now is o'er 
Your voice we'll hear no more 



254 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Your d'lst lies silent in tlie tomb 
Your soul has gone to its final home. 

There's not a doubt upon our mind 
But victory you obtained 
Although you've left us here behind 
We hope to meet agnin. 

And since it is God's Holy will 

We must be parted for awhile 

In sweet submission, all as one 

Wc say, "Our Father's will be done". 



MARY MAGDALENE HILL 

By request of her father I will write the 
death of Mary Hill. She was born August 
the 29, 1929, she was the youngest daugh- 
ter of Caleb and Eva Hill. 

Her death was attributed to measles 
and pneumonia. It was a'most heart- 
breaking to see the little thing have to 
suffer so much. She died May 8, 1931 and 
was laid to rest the second Sunday in May 
in the family cemetery. 

Elder J. A. Herndon conducted the fu- 
neral services. She leaves to mourn their 
loss, father, mother, four sisters and one 
brother. 

The little babe is gone to rest, to reign 
with God for ever blest. 
Written by her aunt, 

LERA COPLEY 



ROBERT L. LUCAS 

It becomes my duty to comply with a 
request of writing >an obituary notice of 
our dear Brother deacon Robert L. Lucas, 
who was born in Black Creek, N. C, on 
Nov. 3rd., 1868, and joined Lower Black 
Creek Primitive Baptist Church on June 
12th., 1887. 

He was married to Diana Rose, daugh- 
ter of Puffin and Morning Pose, of BlacK 
Creek, N. C, on November 11th., 1888. 

To this union were born 10 children, 
seven boys and three girls, two of the 
children dying in infancy. 

In the year 1922 the church of which 
he was a devoted member saw fit to 
choose him as their church clerk, which 
office he filled faithfully until his death. 

In June 1923 the church saw the qual- 
ifications of deaconship in this dear man 
of God. He was chosen and set apart to 
this high office, which he also humbly 
and faithfully filled to the end. 

As it was my sweet privilege to know 
him, though it was but for a short time. 
I loved him for Christ's sake. He was 
a good and faithful husband, loving father 
and neighbor, always attending to his own 
affairs and not a busy body in other 
men's matters. 

His good home was indeed a home for 
his brethern, sisters and friends. 

Besides his devoted children, he leaves 
a lonely -widow, who feels her loss most 
keenly. 



The church at Lower Black Creek has 
lost a devoted member, and the county 
and state a good citizen. May God's rich- 
est blessing rest upon each one who feels 
their great loss by the passing of this 
dear man of God. 

His funeral was conducted by the un- 
worthy writer, his pastor, in the midst of 
a host of sorrowing friends and relatives, 
on December 28, 1930. 

The pall bearers were his fellow dea- 
cons of Black Creek Church. 

JOSEPH D. FUY, 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 



MRS. ELVIRA BALFOUR TARKENTOJN 

In memory of my dearly beloved cousin 
Mrs. Elvira Balfour Tarkenton, who pass- 
ed to the great beyond May 12, 1931. She 
leaves to mourn their loss four sons and 
one dear daughter. Her sons are Mr. R. 
W. Tarkenton formely of the Norfolk Fire 
Department, but who is now an invalid 
and was unable to .attend his mother's 
funeral, Mr. B. V. Tarkenton, Mr. C. E. 
Tarkenton and Mr. T. W. Tarkenton all 
of Norfolk and Mrs. L. B. Litchfield ot 
Cradock with whom she made her home 
since her widowhood some years ago an(j 
who was a daughter in every respect. She 
and her husband did all in their power 
for her, securing the best medical skill 
giving her kind care and nursing but her 
span of life was run and no hand could 
stay the approach of death. She was the 
d.aughter of James F. Balfour and his 
first wife. She was bereft of her mother 
when a small child and was cared for in 
the same home of my dear mother and 
grandmother, Mrs. C. A. Cox and Mrs. Sal- 
lie Balfour. She was like a mother and 
sister combined to me, I'eing several years 
older than myself, she was one of the 
sweetest characters I've ever known. 

She had been in failing health for a 
long period of time, being subject to at- 
tacks of something like heart asthma but 
for several weeks previous to her death 
had seemed better so she could walk a- 
rcund and talked with the neighbors which 
she seemed to enjoy and they were hope- 
ful that she might ))e spared awhile long- 
er. On the evening of May 12th., she re- 
tired to her room at bed time, was taken 
v.-ith an attack of heart trouble and only 
lived a few hours. Her death was a shock 
to every one who knew and loved her. 

She was a member of the Methodist 
Church and for sometime had a great de- 
sire to be able to go to church and com- 
mune. On the Sunday previous to her 
death was able to go to church and com- 
mune with her church. 

The funeral was conducted at the home 
by her pastor Mr. Edgar A. Potts amid 
a large concourse of sorrowing relatives 
and friends. The floral offerings were 
numerous and beautiful bearing mute 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



255 



evidence to the high esteem in which she 
was held. Her precious baby was laid to 
rest in Olive Branch Cemetery Ports- 
mouth, there to await the coming of Jesus 
to gather up his jewels. 

May God comfort her bereaved child- 
ren and cause them to emulate her exam- 
ple of piety and service of Him whom 
she served. 

Calm on the bosom of thy God, 

Poir spirit, rest thee now! 
E'en while with us thy footsteps trod; 

His seal was on thy brow. 

Dust to thy narrow house beneath! 

Soul, to thy place on high! 
They that have seen thy look in death, 

fio more may fear to die. 
Lone are the faiths, and sad thebowers. 

Whence thy meek smile is gone. 
Eut O, a brighter home than ours, 

In heaven is now thine own., 
Written by her lonely cousin, 
Mrs. J. B. Hathaway 



K*;SU1A T10I\S OP RESPECT 

Whereas it has been the will of our 
Heavenly Father to take from us our be- 
loved brother John Gideon Walton, who 
departed this life May 2nd., 1931, mak- 
ing his stay on earth 62 years. 

Brother Walton united with the church 
at Malmaison Pittsylvania County, Vir- 
ginia at its June meeting 1897. 

He was a firm believer in the doctrine 
of Salvation by Grace. 

Therefore be it resolved, 1st., That in 
the passing of Brother Walton the Church 
has lost a faithful member, but we feel 
that our loss is his eternal gain. 

2nd., We extend to the family our deep- 
est sympathy. 

3rd., That a copy of these resolutions 
te sent to Zions L-andmark for publica- 
tion. 

Done by order of the church in confer- 
ence at its June meeting 1931. 

D. V. SPANGLER, Mod. 
R. S. WILLIAMS, Clerk. 



k:;s()li tions of respect 

Whereas, it has pleased Almighty (Jod 
tc visit our little flock at Fellowship 
Church, and call from us our dear bro- 
ther, Jas. E. Olive, who was born Oct. 
22nd., 1877, and died April 11th., 1931. 

His stay on earth 54 years, 6 months 
11 days. 

Where>3s we feel that in his passing 
that the church h-as lost a faithful mem- 
ber and the family a good and instruct- 
ive father and husband. 

Therefore be it reesolved: 

First, That the church at Fellowship 
bow in humble submission to the will oi 
our heavenly Father that doeth all things 
■well, and is too good to be unkind. 



Though we feel that we will miss his 
presence, we also feel our loss is his 
eternal gain. 

Second, That the church at Fellow- 
ship extend to the bereaved family their 
heartfelt sympathy hoping that the God 
of all grace will comfort them and cause 
them to feel that he is resting from his 
lalors that his work will follow him. 

Third, That a copy of these resolutions 
hs placed on our church record and a 
copy be sent to Zion's Landmark for put- 
lication. 

Done by order of Fellowship church in 
conference Saturday before the first Sun- 
d-iy in June 1931. 

ELDER L. H. STEPHENSON, Moderator 
J. C. LANGDON, Clerk 
MAYME LANGDON. 
ELGIE WILLIAMS, Committee 



MR. E. T. BARKL.EY 

Mr. E.T. Barkley departed this lite 
Saturday at 11:30 o'clock at his home 4 
miles east of Elm City, at the age of 87. 
He had been feeble for several years. Had 
been confined to his room for four mon- 
ths, during which time he suffered intense 
pain. 

He bore his sufferings patiently and 
gladly welcomed death. 

Mr. Barkley was born in 1844 in Nor- 
thampton county, and was the last sur- 
vivor of 5 brothers and 2 sisters. 

His last brother J. H. Barkley preced. 
ed him 10 years ago. 

The funeral was conducted at 4 o'clock 
at the home by Rev. R. N. Childress of 
Rocky Mount, and Dr. W. W. Barnes. 

He enlisted in the service of his coun- 
try in 1861 and served through out the 
war between the states; with good record, 
was wounded in the !r \ He retained a 
wonderful memory, i ou'd even call the 
roll of his ronir.in;'. r'; ' on one occasion 
during his sickness. Le united with the 
Missionary Baptist (iMin-h when quite a 
young man, and was a faithful soldier 
of the cross. 

His wife Mrs. Anna Barkley preceded 
him to the grave 6 years ago. He leaves 
fo survive him a son and daughter, W. 
E. Barkley and Miss Allie Lee Barkley, 
besides a number of nieces and nephews. 
Tie was a kind loving husband and father 
and was faithfully attended to by his de- 
voted daughter and son who were always 
willing to render all the service loving 
hearts could do. He had lived a life of 
service and set a good example for his 
children and relatives. He will be greatly 
missed by them as will a host of friends. 

The active pall bearers were his neph- 
ews J. T. Barkley, H. S. Barkley, W. Z. 
Barkley, E. L. Barkley and Z. L. Dawson 

He was laid to rest in the Elm City 
cemetery. 



256 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ELDER I). M. VAIL DIES. 

Elder D. M. V-ail of Binhamton, N. Y.. 
died June 25th., 1931. His many corres- 
pondents and friends will miss him much 
but it is well that he has gone hence 
since he had lived be/Dnd the time us- 
ually allotted to man. 

We extend our sympatb ' to the bereav- 
ed family and friends. 



THE UPPER COUNTRY LINE 

ASSOCIATION MEETS 

Dear Brethren: 

The next session of tb 3 Upper Country 
L;ine Association will c'nvene, the Lord 
willing, with the Church at Pleasant 
Grove in Caswell Count-', North Carolina. 
This Church is located about fifteen miles 
East of Reidsville, N. C, on a top soil 
road which connects 703 with 65 high- 
ways. In coming from the West via Reids- 
ville leave Reidsviile on No. 6 5 hard sur- 
face and go to Dove's Cross Roads, turning 
short to the right for a distance of about 
two miles; if coming vi-a Yanceyville from 
the East follow the same route No. 65 to 
Dove's Cross Roods, and take the •oft for 
two miles to church; if coming from the 
South leave 703 near George Rice's store, 
and turn due north on top soil road v/hich 
leads direct to meeting house. 

The Upper Country Line Association 
convenes on Saturday morning, July 2 5th, 
and continues three days, holding with 
business sessions on Saturday afternoon 
and Monday mornin-,. If you antlclr.ate 
coming via railroad buy ycur ticket to 
Reidsville, N. C, and first write Elder T. 
A. stanfield, Reidsville, N. C, No. 7, «nd 
he will render any aid possible in arrang- 
ing for your entertainment and comfort. 

The position of the Upper Country Line 
Association with regard to doctrine and 
practice is generally known, and it af- 
fords us a genuine pleasure to have our 
fiiends and brethren come to see us. As 
Predestinarian Baptists we have no com- 
Piromise to miake with Condition'alism. 
Our Association is in peace. If you are in 
fellowship with us and in good standing 
as Primitive Baptists at home we shall be 
delighted to have you visit our Associa- 



tion, and Elders of this order are espec- 
ially invited. 

J. W. GILLIAM, JR., 

Association Clerk. 



* ASSOCIATION NOTICE 

The n.^xt Staunton Rh-er Primitive B.ip- 
tist A^soci.ition will be held with Mount 
Arrarat Church near Mount Cross, Va., 
eight m^les north of Danville, Va., Friday 
Saturd;iy and second Sunday in August 
1931. 

Ministes and brethren of our faith and 
order invited to meet with us. 

WM. R. DODD, Association Clerk. 
R. L. DODGON, As:-iEtant Clerk. 



WILL ATTEND STAUNTON RIA^K 
ASSOCIATION 

Elder R. Lester Dodson, pastor Eben- 
ezer Primitive Baptist Church of New 
York City, and Elder Joshua T. Rowe, pas- 
tor Ebenezer Primitive Baptist Church of 
Paltimore City, will preach at Malmaison, 
Va., on Wednesday after first Sunday in 
August (5) thence to Staunton River As- 
sociation at Mt. Arorat. 



STAOTON RIVER ASSC/CIATION 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 
Dear sir: 

Please p'iblish In the Landmark that 
the next As^orlaticn of the Stauntrn Riv- 
er will ) c iield at th e Old Monn'.ain 
Church, the second [ unday in Augrst and 
Sj.turday before. 

We v/c.nt all the minister,", :hat can and 
feel so disposed to come. 

Yours in hope, 

ANNIE ASTEN, 
Danville, Va., Route 6. 



LINVILIiE UNION 

The next session of the Linville Union 
is appointed to be held with the Primi- 
tive Baptist Church, at Lexington. David- 
aon County, N. C, on Saturd.iy and fiftn 
Sunday in August 19?,1. 

An invitation is extended to ministers, 
hrethern, sisters and friends who have a 
mind to attend. 

W. L. TEA(n K 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

■ AT - 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIV. JULY 15, 1931 No. 17 



THEY FEARED THE LORD AND SERVED THEIR GRAVEN IMAGES. 

"Unto this day they do after the former manners: they fear not the 
Lord, neither do they after their statutes, or after their ordinances, or af- 
ter the law and commandment, with w^hich the Lord commanded the chil- 
dren of Jacob whom he nameu Israel. With whom the Lord had made 
a convenant, and charged them, saying, ye shall not fear other gods, nor 
bow yourselves to them, nor sei've them, nor sacrifice to them. 

But the Lord who brought you up out of the land of Egypt, with great 
power and a stretched out arm, him shall ye fear, and him shall ye wor- 
ship, and to him shall ye do sacrifice. 

And the statutes and the ordinances, and the law and the command- 
ments, which he wrote for you, you shall observe to do forever more, and 
ye hall not fear other gods. 

....d the covenant that I have made with you, ye shall not forget; 
neither shall ye fear other gods. 

But the Lord your God ye shall fear; and he shall deliver you out of 
the hands of all your enemies. 

Howbeit they did not hearken, but they did after their former manners. 

So these nations feared the Lord and served their graven images, both 
their children and their children's children; as did their fathers so do 
they unto this day. — 2 Kings 17:34-41. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 

ELDER JOEL E. MARSHAL Meadows of Dan, Va. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths v/here is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

NOTICE' 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffice. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and also 
state his postoffice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if possible, 
and when he renews give the same name it has been going in, 
unless he wishes it changed, then he should state both the old 
and new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted in the date after 
your name within a month, piease inform us of it. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers of 
trtuh. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 



Wilson, N. C. 



Zton'e 3Lan6marh 

2)epote& to the Cause of 3cms Cbdst 



EXPERIENCE 

"It was a stricken deer that 

left the herd 
Long since. With many an arrow 

deep infixed 
My panting side was charged, 

when I withdrew 
To seek a tranquil death in 

distant shades. 

There I was found by One 

who had Himself 
Been hurt by the archers. In his 

side He bore 
And in His hands and feet 

the scars, 
With gentle force soliciting 

the darts, 
He drew them forth, and healed, 

and bade me live. 

Since then, with few associates. 

in remote 
And silent woods I wander, 

far from those 
My former partners of the 

peopled scene ; 
With few associates, and not 

wishing more." 
— Cowper, "The Task," Book III. 

How blessed is the story told of 
the work of the Spirit; of the fav- 
ored sinner's experience who is call- 
ed by grace ; of the comforting rev- 
elation of salvation, and the heaven- 
ly effects and fruits felt and bro- 
ught forth in God's elect who know 
the grace of God in truth.-Col. 1:6. 

"I was a stricken deer that left 



the herd long since." "Thine arrows 
are sharp in the heart of the king's 
enemies; whereby the people fall 
under thee." — Psalm 45-5. 

When God sendeth forth his ar- 
rows he does not draw his "bow at 
a venture."— 2 Chron. 18-33. Such 
a thought has no place in the doc- 
trine of God our Savior, but has its 
place in the "another gospel which 
is not another." — Gal. 1:6-7. Pro- 
claimed by men who know not the 
truth as it is in our precious Savior, 
the Lord Jesus Christ. 

"But thus the eternal counsel ran, 
Almighty grace arrest that man ; 
I felt the arrows of distress. 
And found I had no hiding place." 

When the set time is come that 
it pleaseth God not to propose but 
call by grace, Jehovah, the Spirit, 
sendeth for his arrows like lightn- 
ing. Not an arrow misseth its mark, 
for the Almighty is the archer. — 
Job 6-4. No armor that the sinner 
has arrayed himself is of any 
avail. No matter how much he may 
have hardened himself in sin and 
flattered himself that he was proof 
against all the lightning of the 
thunder of God in the law. "Thine 
arrows are sharp in the heart." 
"They were pricked in their heart." 

—Acts 2-37. 

"Deep are the wounds thine 

arrows give, 
They pierce the hardest heart, 



258 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



Thy smiles of grace the slain 
revive, 

And joy succeeds the smart." 

Who was more sinful, more hard- 
ened than I? With the herd I ran 
in pursuit of fleshly lusts; fulfilling 
the desires of the flesh and of the 
mind, by nature a child of wrath 
even as others. But the Holy Ghost 
sent forth an arrow that hit me — 
even me, the chief of sinners, O, 
w>_at amazi .g grace! What divine 
lo\' and mercy was this the proof 

0. ! Was the whole herd of mankind 
shot at? Was it a random shot that 
by chance riruck me, and brought 
me down? O, no! The work of the 
Lord is perfect. I was the one aim- 
0 [ it, and with no uncertainty does 
the Lord send forth the arrows 
from his quiver. 

"I was a s.ricken deer." As I re- 
view all the dealings of the Lord 
of Hosts with my soul how sover- 
eign are all his acts of grace, hovv' 
distinguishing his love and mercy 
to such a vile sinner like me ! Oh 
that I could love and praise the pre- 
cious and glorious name of God, my 
redeemer, for his marvelous lov- 
ing kindness to my soul. The Lord 
wounded me. His sovereign grace 
and mercy singled me out, and I' 
truly found his "arrows sharp in my 
heart," and I felt in my soul, O, 
what a sinner I am ! A rebel, an ene- 
my of God, a hell deserving wretch, 
God is against me, the poison where 
of drinketh up my spirit; the terrors 
of G )d do set themselves in array 
against me." — Job 6-4. As Job thus 
expro ses himself, so I found it. That 
scripture, "Boast not thyself of to- 
morrow, for thou knowest not what 
a day may bi'ing forth," — Prov. 27- 

1, dashed me to the earth. My con- 
templated life in the pleasure of siii 



was blighted. My sins so many and 
so great, as sharp arrows of the law, 
wounded me, I was stricken through 
ani through by my sins. The law 
01 G ;d I found to be unto death. It 
v/as the ministration of condemna- 
tion and death to me a vile trans- 
gressor. — 2 Cor. 3 :7-9. My sins, tak- 
ing occasion by the commandment, 
deceived me, and by it slew me. — 
Rom. 7:11. Sin revived and I died; 
the commandment which was or- 
dained unto life I found to be unto 
death. 

"I was a stricken deer." Stricken 
by the Lord. I felt I must perish, 
for the arrows of eternal justice 
pierced me and the poison thereof 
drank up my spirit. 

They were indeed deadly ai•ro^vs. 
Tpho\ah's iust and holy condenma- 
ti..n convicted my soul of guilt. His 
KMioi-s mriJe me ^ore afraid. Yes, 
I .e.ired [;;(.!re v.as no c^Ccipo for 
sulI: a sinnor. I ^ai 1 in my soul, hell, 
Ihe damnaiivon of liell, is sui-ely (!cs- 
("naiijn and justlv my {)'n'ti(!n. O 
what pain and gi'ief possessed my 
soul. T rememb;~r one diiy, wb.en in 
the midst of my di-'tress, i sac in 
anguish of soiii |V n lei iim- <)\'er my 
avfiil c<);x'ip''vi. and so vile and a- 
'> ) >il>!.'il ; .J'V 1 t( el I was; such a 
mass t)L" siii, I Wc'.s well nigh plung- 
ed into despair, and I felt there can 
be no mercy for such a vile trangres- 
sor. On every hand I could see that 
which brought my sins to view, and 
the law that I had transgressed 
Tirnved its cu)-ses on my sinful head. 
\\''!:;t v,v!< I in do to assuage my 
wo-'in 'e 1 h«»nrt? Filled with aiig- 
r--'- V , V :-l 

!he 

' i\. 'i nieiv\-. — i'j.dies. 2-1, in store 
f^!- my soul. The wounds which 
God's thus made in my heart I 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



259 



could not heal, and I judged they 
were forerunners of my eternal de- 
struction, and that now the Lord 
was about to destroy me utterly. "I 
was a stricken deer that left the 
herd long since." Yes, when about 
a month passed my 15th birthday, 
some 60 years ago, the Lord separa- 
ted me from the herd. The work of 
the Holy Ghost in my soul was such 
I could not run to the same excess 
riot with my companions in sin. The 
time past of my life sufficed me. — 
Peter 4-3. I now loathed the paths 
of sin, and sought to find the way 
of holiness. Before I was a stricken 
deer I could run as eagerly as any 
of the herd in transgressions, in vile 
practices and filthy conversation. 
In all ungodliness I revelled and 
banqueted, taking my fill of sin. 
But when Jehovah's arrow wound- 
ed me "I was a stricken deer." My 
heart was faint, the pleasures in 
the pursuit of sin languished and 
died. I had no heart to keep up 
with the herd. God's voice in the 
law gave me (so I felt) my deatli 
wound, and his gracious and divine 
work in my soul had implanted and 
begotton hatred of evil, and hun- 
gerings and thirstings after right- 
eousness. — Matt. 5:6. Prov. 8:13. I 
"turned from transgression" — Isa- 
iah 57-20. I wanted the companion- 
ship of the herd no longer. God's 
arrows within me so distressed me 
and drank up my spirit. — Job 6-4. 
My sinful and perishing condition 
occupied all my thought; cut me 
off from the pursuit of the pleas- 
ures of sin, others might run after 
vain and vile delights, but as for 
me "I was a stricken deer" Jehov- 
ah's arrow had arrested me, for- 
bade my continuance with the herd 
in their vile and wicked ways, "I 
left the herd long since." Yes, I 



shunned my former associates; their 
very presence and sinful conversa- 
tion seemed to aggravate my pain- 
ful wounds. As I evaded them and 
secluded myself some of them 
sought me, and inquired what was 
the matter with me, was I sick? 
What made me so sad looking and 
lonely? After persistent inquiries, 
at length I told them what was the 
trouble with me, and how I could 
not any longer run with them in sin. 
At this they laughted and jeered, 
and I became their laughing stock, 
and the butt of many of their sinful 
jokes. But "with many an arrow 
deep infixed my panting side was 
charged." They were no skin deep 
wounds God's arrows made in me, 
but "deep infixed" his arrows were 
lodged by his almighty power and 
love, and thus I entered into the 
experience of one who cried out: 
"Thine arrows stick fast in me, 
and thy hand presseth me sore." — 
Psalm 38-2. No creature power can 
extract the arrows of the Almighty. 
It is the Lord who said "I wound and 
I heal."— Deut. 32 :29 ; Job 5:18. His 
own gracious hands removed the ar- 
rows and bind up the wounds. Truly 
thou art glorious and wonderful in, 
thy works, O Lord. 

How surprisingly gracious, teem- 
ing with loving kindness and infi- 
nite tender mercy have all thy deal- 
ings been with a poor sinner like 
me! Oh that I could love thee and 
praise thy glorious and matchless 
name. 

"With many an arrow deep in- 
fixed my panting side was charged." 
All my attempts to draw forth these 
arrov/s lacerated my soul the more. 
God's barbed arrows pierced my 
heart, not one of which could I re- 
move. Each day fresh arrows from 
Jehovah's bow were "deep infixed" 



260 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



in me, and O, what pangs, what 
sorrows my soul underwent. I 
mourned and wept in solitude, dis- 
tressed by my hateful, cruel sins, 
harrassed by the devil, and the cur- 
ses, the arrows of the law drank up 
my spirit. "I was a stricken deer 
that left the herd long since, with 
many an arrow deep infixed my 
panting side was charged, when I 
withdrew to seek a tranquil death 
in distant shades.'" 

The stricken deer with its life 
blood ebbing away faint and ex- 
hausted, retires to die. "I was a 
stricken deer," in whom God's ar- 
rows were "deep infixed." The sor- 
rows of death encompassed me and 
the pains of hell got hold of me 
T found trouble and sorrow. "Ready 
f perish" was I, to die in my sins — 
[ .Hit. 26-5; Isaiah 27-13. None but 
those who have been stricken by 
I he arrows of the Lord know what 
are the sorrows of this death. Sin 
is the poison of the Almighty's ar- 
r:,ws in the law. Sin drank up my 
spirit — Job 6-4. Sin is the sting of 
death — 1 Cor. 15-56. O, when the 
Holy Ghost conceived my soul of 
sin by the arrows of the law, I felt 
there was not hope for me. I was 
ready to die. How could I survive 
the sting of death? What could 
save me from my sin? Sin taking 
occasion by the commandment de- 
ceived me, and by it slew me. — 
Rom. 7-11. Thus was I taught, and 
thus prepared to know and confess 
to the praise of the Lord of Hosts 
that "salvation is of the Lord." — 
Jonah 2-9. There I was found by 
One who had himself been hurt 
by the archers." It was the Lord 
who found me. As it is written, 
"The Lord's portion is his people; 
Jacob is the lot of his inheritance. 
He found him in a desert land and 



in the waste howling wilderness; 
he led him about, he instructed him, 
he kept him as the apple of his eye." 
— Deut. 32:9-10. Dear Lord thou 
hast said, "Thou shalt remember all 
the way the Lord thy God hath led 
thee." — Deut. 8-2. O, can I ever for- 
get, ever unmindful be of thy wond- 
rous acts of tender mercy to my 
soul! O what proofs of thy eternal 
love hast thou revealed to my soul's 
everlasting consolation. It passeth 
knowledge, passeth all telling that 
dear love of thine, O, God! A poor 
vile, sinful worm am I, and yet thou 
lovest me and hast redeemed me 
Irum my sins, from all my woes. 
Thou hast put gladness in my heart, 
and in the earnest of thy Spirit in 
my heart I rejoice in hope of the 
glory of God; that I, a poor, vile 
transgressor with all the elect and 
blood bought flock shall be glori- 
fied together with thy dear Son, 
our Jesus, Emmanuel. 

"Immortal honors be unto thy 

glorious name, 
I would thy praises evermore 

proclaim. 
My soul all grace and power 

ascribes to thee. 
For thou ; O Lord, hath saved 

a wretch like me." 

When in a solitary way, — Psalm 
107 — sick and wounded and ready 
to die. "There I was found by One 
who had himself been hurt by the 
archers." Jesus sought me and 
found me. He is the great Shepherd 
of the sheep. — Luke 15:4-6, Ezek. 
34. Well do I now remember the 
time when in my soul's distress I 
first saw Jesus with the eye of 
faith. When he was thus revealed 
to my soul I saw he "had himself 
been hurt by the archers." I 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



261 



beheld him the antitypical Joseph. 
"The archers have sorely grieved 
him, aiid shot at him, and hated 
him, but his bow abode in strength, 
and the arms of his hands were 
made strong by the hands of the 
mighty God of Jacob." — Gen. 49: 
23-24. Christ Crucified! O I had 
been thinking it was useless to cry 
for mercy, for I felt I was altogether 
too vile a transgressor, that there 
could be no hope for a wretch like 
me. The terrors of Jehovah's justice 
made me afraid, and I could see 
nothing before me but to perish in 
my sins. At length the Holy Ghost 
the Comforter spake these words in 
my heart, "God is love." A little 
hope sprang up in my distressed 
heart, and in bitter anguish over 
my sins I cried "God be merciful to 
me a sinner." It was the dear Lord 
who taught me thus to pray, and 
thus I became one of those whom 
he calls "My suppliants." — Zeph. 
3-10. Years have passed since first 
I cried unto the Lord in my distress, 
and to this day I am often found a 
suppliant at the feet of the Lord. 
O what marvelous grace to me is 
shown. Yes, by the lovingkindness 
of the Lord I can sing "I love the 
Lord because he hath heard my 
voice and my supplications; because 
he hath inclined his ear unto me, 
therefore will I call upon him as 
long as I live." — Psalm 116:1-2. 
When first my soul was exercised 
to cry to God for mercy I felt my 
need, but did not know, I could not 
.see how mercy could reach me. 
How could the holy and just God 
pardon my sins? But when Jesus 
found me, O what a revelation of 
mercy and salvation I found in him. 

"There in my grief and wounds 
a stricken deer, with many arrows 
■dBBV. infixed T .V.-: f,„n,d V,. On. 



who had himself been hurt by the 
archers." It was at night time, in 
my bed room, sometimes upon my 
knees, sometimes pacing up and 
down the room, in my wounds and 
deep distress, imploring the Lord to 
have mercy upon my soul and to 
pardon all my sins, that Jesus, the 
dear Savior was discovered to me. 
There was presented to my mind 
a vision of Christ crucified. I saw 
Jesus, the dear Redeemer, on the 
cross; and while thus I gazed upon 
him a voice in my soul said, "Sal- 
vation is in my dear Son." 

Then, for the first time it was 
revealed to my soul God's way of 
salvation. As one perishing my 
heart went forth in cries, and sighs 
and bitter tears unto Jesus to save 
me. I saw indeed that he was the 
"One who had himself been hurt 
by the archers. In his side he bore 
and in his hands and feet the cruel 
scars." Never shall I forget the sight 
the Holy Spirit gave me of the cru- 
cifixion of the Son of God. O how 
hideous and hateful did sin appear 
that the Holy One, the Christ of 
God should so suffer. He was made 
sin for us who knew no sin that we 
might be made the righteousness of 
God in him." For some time on ben- 
ded knees that night, with cries im- 
portunate, I besought the Almighty 
to shew me mercy, and all the while 
in my mind I saw the dear Savior 
extended on the cross in agonies and 
blood. 

"In his side he bore and in his 
hands and feet the cruel scars." 
Yes, Emmanuel, Our Lord Jesus 
Christ, was the One who was hurt 
by the archers.— Gen. 43 :23-24. 

To save his people from their sins 
he came into the world. He being 
iji Ihe form of God thought it not 



262 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



he took upon him the form of a ser- 
vant. He came to do the will of the 
Father. He was made flesh, and 
made sin, and made a curse for the 
sins of his people. He bare our sins 
in his own body on the tree, and 
when the "due time" Rom. 5:6 was 
come he was smitten by the arrows 
of the Almighty. "He was smitten 
of God and afflicted," "For the 
transgression of my people was he 
stricken." Isaiah 53:4-8. O what a 
sacred awful sight to view; Christ 
crucified while the Holy Ghost op- 
ens to the soul the unfathomable 
depths of Jehovah's justice and 
grace in the atonement by the pre- 
cious blood of Christ. While thus at 
the feet of the Crucified One, long- 
ing for some word, some glance to 
heal my painful wounds and save 
me from my sin and misery. I tho- 
ught the dear Redeemer looked 
down upon me from the cross, and 
with such compassion and tender 
love in his countenance that it seem- 
ed to my soul that he "with gentle 
force solicited the darts" that lac- 
erated my poor soul. I felt to cast 
my all on him, to repose myself a- 
lone in his sufferings and blood to 
save me from my perishing con- 
dition, to heal all my wounds. And 
this he did, for at length he looked 
with such surprising love upon me 
and said to my heart, "I suffer for 
thee, I did this for thee; I died for 
thee. 

The arrows that stuck fast in me, 
his own hand, his salvation, "drew 
them forth, and healed and bade me 
live." 

O what mercy to a vile sinner like 
me ! What comfort and rejoicing fil- 
ed my heart. My wounds were heal- 
ed, my pain and anguish were gone. 
I believed in him by the mighty 
vower of God ; yes, I believed he 



had suffered and died, endured the 
curse of the law, had purged away 
my sins in his own precious blood. 
The remainder of that (to me) 
memorable night I spent in sacred 
joyful meditation upon the wonders 
of love, and mercy, and grace re- 
vealed to me a poor sinner, in the 
sight of Christ crucified, O my ran- 
somed, healed soul was bowed be- 
fore the Lord in love and adoration. 

"Since then, with few associates, 

in remote 
And silent woods I wander, 

far from those 
My former partners of the 

peopled scene; 
With few associates, and not 

wishing more," 

Jehovah's discriminating grace 
so wrought in my heart that I could 
no more associate "with my former 
partners of the peopled scene." 
Poor sinners saved by the grace of 
God are those whom now I love to 
meet, and in sweet fellowship hold 
sweet converse upon the matchless, 
glorious and gracious works of the 
Lord our God in the salvation of sin- 
ners. Those who like myself can say, 
"I was a stricken deer" who have 
known the wounds that God inflicts 
— Jer. 30:17; Hos. 6:1, and who 
by the graciousness of the Lord can 
say, "With his stripes we are heal- 
ed. — Isaiah 53:5. Such associates I 
crave. These in the gospel of Christ 
are my bosom companions — Psalm 
119 :63, and so precious is their com- 
panionship that I feel I owe a debt 
of gratitude to the blessed God that 
I am favored to have the blessed- 
ness of the fellowship of some of 
the blood bought flock of Emman- 
uel. It is written that "Lot was vex- 
ed with the filthy conversation of 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



263 



the wicked; for that righteous man 
dwelling among them in seeing and 
hearing, vexed his righteous soul 
from day to day with their unlaw- 
ful deeds." So in measure it is with 
all the "taught of the Lord." The 
child of God soon learns that he is 
a pilgrim and a stranger in the 
world; and that he need not marvel 
if the world hate him. 

But with those of "like precious 
faith" — 2 Peter 1:1 he desires to 
walk and sojourn in this present ev- 
il world. 

"Midst scenes of confusion and 
creature complaint 

How sweet to my soul is com- 
munion with saints, 

To find at the banquet of mercy 
there's room. 

And feel in the presence of 
Jesus at home." 

Your brother in the fellowship of 
Christ's gospel, 

FREDERICK W. KEENE 
Raleigh, N. C. 



A DAY OF JOY 

On the 21st, day of June, which 
was the third Sunday, I was 73 
years old. My children all came to 
see me and brought full baskets and 
boxes of good things to eat. It was 
a day of joy to me. There were ele- 
ven boys and four girls and their 
wives and husbands and children, 
thirty grandchildren, eleven great- 
grandchildren and many of my 
friends whom I was very glad to 
see. My children brought me many 
presents which I was proud of. 
While looking over the picnic tab- 
le, stretched across the lawn,- I felt 
like talking about the goodness of 
God who has been so merciful to 
me. anr-wcrod oil r^v i^vpvovs and 



blessed me with a hope in his son 
45 years ago. 

I will be very glad to hear from 
any of the brethren and sisters or 
friends I know. I am a sinner and 
if saved at all I am saved by the 
grace of God. 

Your true friend, 

RILEY SHEPARD. 
Chinquapin, N. C. 
R. F. D. No 1, Box 65. 



MARRYING IS OF THE LORD 

Mr. John D. Gold, ' 
Wilson, N. C, 
Dear Sir :- 

Please publish in Zion's Land- 
mark as soon as possible your 
fathers views on a subject, request- 
ed by brother S. M. Price, published 
in Zion's Landmark, dated February 
the 1st, 1930, on pages 139 and 140. 

I have been reading the Land- 
mark for thirty years. I always re- 
garded your father as one of the 
safest counselors that we had in 
his day or since. 

He was a good useful man of 
God. 

Yours very truly, 

ENOS SIKES 
Asheboro, N. C. 



Elder P. D. Gold, Dear Brother 
— Please give your views through 
the Landmark of ministers leav- 
ing their Avives, getting a divorce, 
and marrying again, and especially 
an Elder of our faith. Do you not 
think it should be a test of fellow- 
ship? Ought not such an one be 
turned out of the church, his creden- 
tials taken from him and be adver- 
tised in our periodicals, that the 
household of faith might know who 
he is, and what he is? 

We think the scripture condemns 



264 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



such, and we should also condemn 
it in our churches. 

I would be very glad if Elder L. 
H. Hardy would give his views on 
the same subject, as I look on him 
as being able counsel also. Hoping 
that both of you will be very plain 
on the subject, I remain yours in 
hope of a better life. 

S. M. PRICE. 

Marrying is of the Lord. A very 
wonderful exhibition of its import 
and sanctity is thrown around it by 
the Lord God in the garden of Eden, 
and reaffirmed by Father, Son, and 
Holy Ghost. 

What God hath joined together 
let not man put asunder, is the lan- 
guage of inspiration. The very first 
effort of the devil was against mar- 
riage. His endeavor was to separate 
Adam and Eve. 

God hates putting away. He made 
them male and female, therefore 
shall a man forsake his father and 
mother and the twain shall be one 
flesh. 

Jesus expounds the law on mar- 
riage and says, what God hath 
joined together let not man put as- 
under. There is only one cause just- 
ifying a divorce. If a man puts away 
his wife for any other cause he vio- 
lates God's law. 

The husband and wife are one. 
He should love her as he loves him- 
self. Whosoever puts away his wife 
save for fornication causes her to 
commit adultery, and whosoever 
marrieth her that is divorced com- 
mits adultery. We should avoid do- 
ing anything that would cause an- 
other to sin. 

How can a man put away his 
wife? They are one flesh. How can 
a man divide himself? In these mod- 
ern times of lewdness and lust, of 



disregard for God's law, and of over 
riding the scriptures, it is quite com- 
mon for both men and women to 
obtain divorces; but in the kingdom 
of heaven it is not so. The mar- 
riage is honorable and the bed un- 
defiled. 

If we love God we love his law, 
and honor his ordinances. 

If a man's wife abandon him 
without his committing a fault then 
we should seek to comfort him. For 
then he is not to be condemned, but 
much to be pitied. He should not 
be held then in bondage. 

This is not the case of one who 
leaves his. wife and marries another 
woman. In such a case I do not see 
how the church can fellowship him. 

P. D. G. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

James R. Jones, dearly beloved bro- 
ther :- 

We received your kind letter last 
evening. Had been wondering how 
your health might be, and whether 
you were able to get about? You 
are with good people, sister Eliza 
and brother G. O. Key. Forty odd 
years ago the good Lord blessed me 
to baptize them in good faith, and I 
love them yet: So it must be after 
a Godly manner, for; the love of 
God never ends, or is everlasting. In 
nature we love our kindred in the 
flesh, our father, mother, brothers 
and sisters, and have respect for 
others. But some how, we are be- 
gotten in love with certain other 
people, and whilst we may see their 
faults we are sorry for them and 
can forgive their failings, which are 
little things because we love them. 
The less we are associated with 
the dear brethren and sisters causes 
us to think that love is waxed cold, 
but when we meet with them, sing 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



265 



preach and pray togteher, the Lord 
appears in the midst, then our love 
abounds with joy and peace. It takes 
the love of God in the heart to keep 
us in peace with each other, so 
where there is is no peace, there is 
no love of God. 

I would love to meet some of 
the people again, whilst many are 
gone to their blessed reward. 

As we get older we reflect, or 
look back on things of the past 
which we have the experience of 
whilst we used to look forward. But 
we are now waiting in hope. 

With love and felloship, we re- 
main your sister and brother. 

D.S. AND LULA WEBB. 



ENJOYS THE MEETING 

Dearly beloved Landmark read- 
ers: 

I am again blessed to write you. 
You are constantly on my mind. 
Every association I attend makes 
me love you more and more. Ours 
in October last was so lovely, 
though it did seem to me like dear 
brother Isaac Jones' funeral. He will 
ere long be remembered. I attended 
each day, and if there is any chew- 
ing cud, I've been chewing it all 
along. I must say that I don't want 
Elder Hill out of my mind long at 
a time. All the preachers were dear 
to me, and I enjoyed hearing all of 
them, and tried to shake each one's 
hand. I did hug brother Kit Brown's 
neck and am glad I did. I so often 
ask the Lord in my weak way to 
spare me and let me go to Cypress 
Creek association, and when the 
time came I was not feeling well, 
but went and almost forgot all my 
ailments. My niece Mrs. Gladys 
Horne, who lives seven miles from 
the church, took me there on Sat- 
urday. I told her and her husband 



to let me alone then till Monday. 
I went with sister Annie Joyner to 
Mr. Zadock King's home on Satur- 
day, his wife is a sweet sister, and I 
visited the home of brother and sis- 
ter G. V. Lanier. I can't forget them 
and I spent one night at dear old 
brother Wilson Batchelor's. I feel 
that I was wonderfully blessed. 
Then I came on to my dear old home 
church, White Oak, and to my sons. 
I visited all my children except the 
one in Georgia, and the one in Ala- 
bama, who recently returned to 
Greenville, my daughter with me 
winter here if nothing prevents. I 
didn't think to write a long letter 
this time. Mr. Gold you will please 
correct mistakes if you see fit to 
publish it. I love you for your 
father's sake and the Landmark 
cause, and sure I'll write for it as 
long as God enables me. I am now 
seventy four, and can see very well. 
Don't use glasses at all and enjoy 
right good health, for which I hope 
to praise the Lord. Please pray for 
me, and I hope you all receive this 
as a token of love and good wishes 
for a prosperous year. 

The same old lonesome sister, I 
hope. 

SUSAN HIGGINS. 
1215 Reade St. 
Greenville, N. C. 



THAT WHERE HE IS WE MAY 
BE ALSO 

My dear beloved brethren, sis- 
ters and friends in the Lord of 
Glory: It is of Him we live, move 
and have our continual being here 
in this world of sin and sorrow, 
notwithstanding the many blessings 
we are permitted to enjoy, both 
temporal and spiritual ; but our 
dear Savior was a man of sorrow 
and was acquainted with grief, yet 



266 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



He never did sin. Guile was not in 
His mouth yet He suffered many 
things for our benefit and to the 
glory of His Father, for He came 
not to do His own will but to do 
the will of His Father who sent 
Him. His will was that of all He 
gave Him, He should lose none, but 
to raise them up at the last day that 
where He is we may be also and 
won't it be most glorious to be with 
the Father and Christ our elder Bro- 
ther and precious Savior and all the 
holy angels around the throne of 
God and the lamb, forever in one 
God. 

Yours in hope of his blessed im- 
mortality. 

J. R. JONES. 



84- YEARS OLD 

A'Jr. John D. Gold, 
Dersr Friend: 

1 am enclosing two dollars to pay 
for m.y Lanimark. I regre; that I 
could not send it before now. Money 
is so hard to get. Since Christmas I 
I could not do any better. I am 84 
years old and not well. A lot of my 
time I am afraid I shall not read 
much longer. I wish you success in 
your business and that God may 
givs us a prosperous year. 

Your friend and well wisher, 
MRS. JULIA A. BRUMFIELD. 

Long Island, Va. 



MISSES THE OLD WRITERS 

P. D. Gold Pub. Co., 

Dear brethren, am sending you 
money order for two dollars to pay 
on my subscription to Zion Land- 
mark. Sorry I can't send more at 
this time. Hope to send you more 
soon. Hope to pay up and get in ad- 
vance. 

Will say if I should move or 



change Postoffice address will in- 
form you. 

The Landmark is much appreciat- 
ed by me. Have been taking it since 
1883, and endorse most all I see in 
it. 

I miss the old writers 
Yours in hope. 

S. M. PAUL, 
Conway, S. C, R. No. 2. 



A WELCOME VISITOR. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Wilson, N. C, 
Dear Mr. Gold: 

My subscription to Zion's Land, 
mark expired January 1, 1931, an 
I am enclosing money order to pa 
for another year or to Janua 
1932. 

The Landmark is a welcome vi 
itor at our home. My wife and I lov 
its blessed truths. It earnestly co 
tends for salvation by grace an 
not creature works. 

I have been impressed for some 
time to write what I hope have been 
the blessings of the dear Lord with 
me in calling me out of nature's 
darkness and translating me into 
the glorious light of the Son of God, 
but so far have not obeyed the im- 
pression because of a deep sense of 
weakness, and unfitness on my part. 
Again I feel I am mistaken about 
t!ic v/hole matter and have nevei' 
knovv-n the Lord in the pardon of 
my many sins. 

The wound of sin is so grievous. 
"O wretched man that I am, who 
shall relieve me from the body of 
this death." Can I say in truth 
with all the saints of God and 
Christ I thank God through Jesus 
Christ my Lord? 

If by the grace of God I am what 
I am it is enough. Then I press for- 
v/ard toward the mark of the 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



267 



prize of the high calling of God in 
Christ Jesus. "If God be for us, who 
can be against us" 

"He that spare not His own Son 
but delivered him up for us all, how 
shall he not with Him freely give 
us all things." 

'Tis all things that pertain to life 
and Godliness. Then why fear the 
wrath of man? Even the wrath of 
man shall praise our God, and the 
remainder of wrath he will restrain. 

W. W. STYRON, 

Roe, N. C. 



ENJOYS THE LANDMARK 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear Sire- 
Enclosed find two dollars to pay 
for the Landmark another year or 
until June 15th, 1932. Am sorry I'm 
late with it but hope it hasn't 
bothered you. I wish to say that I 
enjoy reading the Landmark and 
especially when one is blessed with 
such light and so beautifully ex- 
plained as our sister Elgie Lee Wil- 
liams wrote on "Duty," in February 
No. 1, and brother Joshua T. Rowe 
on Vashti, June 15th number and 
so many, many others. But will not 
mention more now, as space will 
not permit. 

May the grace of God be with 
you. 

MRS. A. F. WHITLEY, SR. 
Smithfield, N. C, R. F. D. 1. 



LANDMARK A PLEASURE. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
■ Wilson, N. C. 
i Dear Sir: 

j Enclosed find money order for 
I two dollars to pay for the Land 
mark for another year. I should 
have sent it before now, but just 
kept neglecting sending it in. The 
Landmark is certainly a pleasure 



to me, I am always glad to receive 
it, for there is always so many good 
letters from the dear brothers and 
sisters. 

I am a member of the Primitive 
Baptist Church of Helena. I joined 
the first Saturday in May 1920, and 
was baptized the first Sunday in 
June by Elder J. J. Hall. He was 
our pastor until his death, we sure 
miss him at our church. 

Yours truly, 

MRS. H. R. BROWN. 
Hurdle Mills, N. C, R. 1 



AN OMISSION 

Stem, N. C, July 15th. 1931 
Mr. John D. Gold, 
My dear Mr. Gold : 

In the letter of brother B. C. Clin- 
ard, which you so kindly published 
in the last issue of the "Landmark" 
there is an omission of one small 
word "not" which so entirely mis- 
construes the intended meaning, I 
am asking if you will please correct. 

In the 10th line from the top of 
page 245 last column, it should read 
"that it was not within me to go to 
the Church earlier or put it off." 

Thanking you in advance, 

I am most sincerely your friend, 
J. H. GOOCH. 



LOVES THE LANDMARK 

Dear Mr. Gold: 

Enclosed you will find check to 
pay for the Landmark. I have been 
taking it for so long that I have 
learned to look for its coming. I love 
it very much. I have spent many an 
hour reading its pages, sometimes 
in tears and sometimes in joy. It 
has been very enlightening to me 
and a great help to the Baptists. 
ELDER W. M. K. TAYLOR 

Sharpsliuig, N. C. 
Route No. 1, Box 82. 



268 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



THROUGH SUFFERING DO WE 
LEARN OBEDIENCE. 

Mr. John D. Gold, 
Dear Sir: 

Enclosed you will find a check 
for $2.00 for which to pay for the 
Landmark for another year. I 
should have sent it before now but 
my health has been so bad for the 
past six months I did not think I 
would live to read it, but God has 
seen fit to keep me here this long, 
for some purpose best known to 
himself. Sinc3 I have lost my useful- 
ness I feel like I am just waiting to 
hear Him call "Child, come home." 
I hope all who see this will pray for 
me, not that I may live but that I 
may be made willing to bear all the 
suffering that the dear Lord sees 
fit to send upon me, for it is through 
suffering that we learn obedience. 

With love to all the saints. 

MRS. H. C. CUMMINGS 
Elm City, N. C, R. No. 3. 



$5.00 FOR SISTER FLYNN. 

Mr. John Gold, 
Dear Sir and Friend: 

Please find enclosed check for 
seven dollars to cover dues for the 
Landmark for one year and five 
dollars for our dear Sister Flynn 
that has asked for help to save their 
home. I hope I am not too late 
contributing my amount. While I 
have other obligations would rather 
give more than to have them lose 
their home, but hope there will be 
enough to open up so they can go 
on their way rejoicing they still 
have friends in this old world. 

Hope you and family are well, I 
remain, 

Your friend, 

J. L. Thompson. 

630 Lake St. 

Rlmhurst Wilniineton. Del. 



OLD COPIES BEING SAVED. 

P. D. Gold Publishing Co., 

I am sending you money order 
for the Landmark I should have 
sent before now. And you will 
please change my address from 902 
Cleveland St., Durham, N. C, to 
61G Shepherd St., Durham, N. C. 

Mrs. Alice Lanier. 

P. S. — I have been a reader of the 
Landmark a number of years, in my 
father's lifetime and after his death 
my husband took it a long time be- 
fore he died and I have enjoyed it 
so much and especially Brothei 
Gold's writing, and I now have 
right many numbers that I go bacP 
and read over again. May tht 
Lord continue to bless you all is mj 
humble prayer. 

Mrs. Alice Lanier, 
616 Shepherd St., 
Durham, N. C. 



A LOT OF ENJOYMENT 

Hr. J. D. Gold, 

Enclosed money order for $2.0i 
to pay for Zion's Landmark to Jurb 
1st, 1931. I am very sorry to hav 
neglected sending it so long. 

I do enjoy reading the experi 
ences of the dear brothers and si^ 
ters. I am in poor health and no 
able to walk to church, so I don' 
go often, for I hate to be a bother t 
any one, and that keeps me at horn 
many times when I would love t 
go. I get a lot of enjoyment reai 
ing the writings of the brothers an 
sisters, though we are strangers ; 
the flesh. 

I hope and feel we have relatioi 
sliip ill the spirit, for they can te 
m\' experience and feelings bettt 
t liaii 1 can myself. 

Your sister, I hope 
Mrs. America McCann, 
P,|,a)'t;i N. C. ^ 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



269 



Zion's Landmark 



I "Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

I Editor 

' Klder 0. J. Denny, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. 

Associate Editors 

blder M. L. Gilbert— Dade City, 
Fla. 

Elder S. B. Denny, Wilson, N. C. 
Elder J. T. Rowe, 704 Deepdene 
Road, Baltimore, Md. 



VOL. LXIV. No. 17 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
as second class matter 



WILSON, N. C. JULY, 15, 1931 



TREES OF RIGHTEOUSNESS. 

Christ is called the Tree of Right- 
eousness, in the singular, and in the 
strict sense. He is the only Right- 
eous Tree, except as His righteous- 
ness, is imputed to others, w^ho are 
called trees of righteousness (tre?s 
in the plural) Isaiah 61:3. 

All such trees of righteousness 
ibear fruits of the Spirit, such as 
"love, joy, peace, longsuffering, 
gentleness, goodness, faith and etc 
and we are told, "Against such 
there is no law," therefore; no con- 
idemnation in the same. 
I Christ, "The Tree of Life", bore 
lall the sins of His people in His own 
body, though the sinless one, He be- 
came the sin bearer of all the people 
:»f God. 

In showing the true relationship 
tetween God the Father, and Son 
tiul the people of God, He was 



pleased to call himself the VINE, 
the Father the husbandman, and 
His people the branches; or the 
outgrowth of the vine. Therefore; 
all the life, and strength and result- 
ing fruitfulness of the branches owe 
their all to the vine which beareth 
them. 

Though Christ is all and in all to 
the branches, yet he makes himself 
of no reputation, giving all the 
glory, honor and praise to the 
Father, saying, "the Father work- 
eth and I work hitherto." 

Christ "The Tree of Righteous- 
ness." The Tree of Life." — Rev. 2: 
7. Is the fountain from whence all 
true obedience flows, and all the 
branches being in Him and proceed- 
ing from Him, yet not removed, owe 
their every conquest, through grace, 
to Him who is their life, and without 
Him there is no spiritual living, to 
Him who is the way, and without 
that way there is no spiritual walk- 
ing, to Him who is the truth, and 
without divine revelation, and di- 
vine teaching, there is no way for 
His people to know the truth, as it 
is in Christ Jesus. 

The wicked are called trees 
whose fruit withereth, whose lives 
are full of wickedness. Read Jude 
12 :13th verses. 

In Rev. 22:2-4, we read of the 
Tree of Life, which bears twelve 
manner of fruit, yielding His fruit 
every month, and the leaves of the 
tree were for the healing of the an- 
tions. Christ, the Tree of Life, is the 
savior of the world; but an especial 
savior to believers in His name. 

Every manner of the fruit of this 
Tree of Life and the leaves thereof 
are useful. Nothing bad in it, for we 
are told. "Beware of false prophets, 
which come to you in sheeps cloth- 
ing; but inwardly they are raven- 



270 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



ing wolves, ye shall know them by 
their fruits. Do men gather grapes 
of thorns, of figs of thistles? Even 
so every good tree bringeth forth 
good fruit; but a corrupt tree bring- 
eth forth evil fruit. A good tree 
CANNOT bring forth EVIL FRUIT, 
neither can a CORRUPT tree bring 
forth GOOD FRUIT.— Matt. 7:15- 
19. 

The rejection of the Jews, wor- 
shipping under law, though spoken 
of as a vine; but not as the "The 
VINE" is fully set forth in Ezekiel 
15 and 17th chapters. Also in Ezek- 
iel we have in the last few verses, 
a description of the setting of Christ 
the goodly Cedar, the True VINE, 
and in Him, and through Him all 
His seed are blest. 

"Thus saith the Lord God; I will 
take the highest branch of the high 
Cedar and will set it; I will crop off 
from the top of his young twigs a 
tender one, and will plant it upon 
a high mountain an eminent, in the 
mountain of the hight of Israel will 
I plant it; and it shall bring forth 
boughs, and bear fruit, and be a 
goodly cedar; and under it shall 
dwell all fowl of every wing, in 
the shadow of the branches thereof 
shall they dwell." 

And all the trees of the field 
shall know that I the Lord have 
brought down the high tree, have 
exalted the low tree, have dried up 
the green tree, and have made the 
dry tree to flourish : I the Lord 
have spoken and have done it." — 
Ezekiel 17:22-24. 

We believe the high tree and the 
green tree here represents national 
Israel, the Jews, once the chosen 
and favored people; as the natural 
branch of the Olive tree, broken off, 
and Christ Jesus, who was of the 
house and lineage of David, a Jew, 



as the low tree, and as the dry trees 
represents the setting up of the Gos- 
pel Kingdom which kingdom shall 
last and abide forever. Thus the un- 
natural branch, the Church of God, 
are thus engrafted into the vine. — 
Romans 11 :17-24. 

Jesus, coming of the house and 
lineage of David, may be regarded 
as the highest branch of the highest 
cedar, yet is broken for our sins, 
wounded for our transgressions, he 
thus becomes the broken branch and 
a tender one. Men regarded him, 
indeed, as a root out of dry ground, 
stricken, smitten of God and afflict- 
ed. He was bruised for iniquities, 
the chastisement of our peace was 
upon Him, and with His stripes we 
are healed. 

He was oppressed, and afflicted, 
yet He opened not His mouth, He is 
brought as a la mbto the slaughter, 
and as a sheep before her shearers 
is dumb, so He opened not His 
m.outh. He is taken from prison and 
judgment, condemned, put to death, 
made His grave with the wicked, 
and with the rich, and thus; we see 
the high tree and the green tree, he 
being of the House of David,brought 
low, yet in all this God was pleased 
to bruise Him, he hath put him to 
grief; when His soul was made an 
offering for sin. Excerpts from 
Isaiah, 53d. Chapter. 

He was the highest branch of 
the highest cedar, in the sense that 
he was the only one who could meet 
all the demands of the law, and thus 
He became the end of the law for 
righteousness to every one that be- 
lieveth. 

In rendering this signal service, 
he had to become as one of them 
and therefore was humbled to the 
dust, tempted in all points as ye are 
tempted that He might know how 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



271 



to make a way of escape from temp- 
tation, yet in all these things he tri- 
umphed gloriously, not for himself 
alone, but for all the peoylo of 
God of every nation, kindred, ton- 
gue and people. 

Thus we see Christ becoming as 
the low tree, and as .the dry tree 
as he suffers with his people, and 
as they suffer with him, they shall 
also reign with him, as the dry tree 
is made to flourish. In this role as 
the mediator, He shall see of the 
travail of His soul and shall be sat- 
isfied. 

This tender branch, of God's 
planting, shall become a goodly ce- 
dar and under its branches and 
boughs, shall dwell all fowl of every 
wing, in the shadow of the branches 
thereof shall they dwell. As Christ 
is likened to a goodly cedar so the 
people of God are likened to all 
fowl of every wing, and thus we see 
sinners, saved by the people coming 
as shelterless doves to their Mas- 
ters windov/s for refuge. 

Here we have a beautiful word 
picture of the birds of every wing, 
I restless, shelterless, timorous, sub- 
I ject to dangers seen and unseen, all 
} coming, through the trackless air, 
I to the one goodly Codar, Christ, 
' and there under the shadow of His 
boughs, they rest in His love, trust 
' in His word, protected by His pow- 
er, solaced and comforted, fed and 
, clothed and given spiritual drink, 
i they trust implicitly in Hin^ whom 
, to know is life eternal. 
In hope, 

O. J. DENNY 



MRS. J. T. LA?.3?,3 

j Ivly dear grandmother diod "XV.iy lii'nd. 
J at her son's home. Vr. 10. I. Lainin. 

[Wilson Mills, N. C. She was 77 y.'ais of 
ftage and had I)oen a fa it'if n l iiicml,.n- of 
j the Primitive nirntist Chnnh for a long 
time. I just don't know how long. 
I Grandmother w;;- iu :40Jd health nntil 



about three years before .she died. Her 
health failed her. Slie was only confined 
to her bed nine days l)efore Jesus called 
her home. 

Grandmother was a devoted christi.in, 
I'ever complaining, but waiting in pa- 
tience nntil Jesus saw fit to call her a- 
Icva. 

She took a great delight in attending 
her chTirch. She always was a kind woman 
to every body land enjoyed the campany 
of her christian .-omrades. 

To this union ten children were born. 
A A are dead and gone to rest but two 
as follows: E. D. Lamm. Clinton, N. C, 
jrrs. W. C. Winstead, Chiytou, N. C. She 
also leaves to mci:rn, o"or a hundred 
grandchildren and great grandchildren 
and a host of friends and other relatives. 

May God enable all of us to live honest 
and upright and try to follow the exam- 
ple of her, the one we hope to meet in 
life eternal. 

Pier funeral took jilace on May 2 3rd, 
19 2 7 in the family cemetery at Lu.cama, 
N. C. A very large crowd attended her 
funeral and her grave was banked with 
lovely flowers. 

I'recious mother you have left I'S, 

Left us, yes, Mr even more, 

But we hope to meet you. 

On that bright and hapjiy shore. 

Dear mother you have left us 
In this world to mourn and sigh, 
i;ut beyond this world of sorrow, 
We hope to meet you in that sweet by 
and by. 

Written by her granddaughter, 

(MISS) nXIE LAMM 

Clinton, N. C. 



RESOT/UTIO\S or KKSPECT 

Wherons it has jdeased our Heavenly 
Feather to remove from our midst, our 
aged and faithful brother, T. S. Dateman 
on May 31st, .1931- T^e it resolved: 

1st. That we, the Churt h at Bethlehem 
Tyrrell county bow iu humble submission 
to the Master Builder who is too wise to 
err and too good to be unkind. 

2nd. That we tender our heart-felt sym- 
pathy to the bereaved family nud pray 
Cod's richest blessings upon them, es- 
pecially those wlio so +enderly and lov- 
ingly nursed him in his declining years, 
even down to the moment when the death 
/ngel came and said, "Child, your Father 
calls, come home." His patience and res- 
ignniion drmonstral od the fact that he 
was overshadowed by Divine power and 
when the end came he quietly and peace- 
fuHy fell asleen in tl-e arms of Jesus, to 
awake in his liken?r.!; and be satisfied. 

3rd. That a copy of these resolutions 
be placod on the chur h record ond a copy 



272 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



sent to Zion's Landmark for publication. 

Done by order of tl;e church in confer- 
ence, Saturday before tlie first Siii'.day ni 
June 1931. 

W. R. MINES, Moderator 
J. B. HOLIDAY, Clerk 



REBECCA L. HARDEE 

It is with a s..5d heart that I attempt to 
write the obituary of my dear mother, 
Rebecca L. Hardee, who departed this life 
January 28, 1931, making her stay on 
earth 84 years, 9 months and 26 days. 

On April 2 5, 1865 she v.'as married to 
my de-ir fatlier, James Hardee, who died 
May 19, 1921. To this union were born 
eleven children, six girls and five boys, 
one girl having preceded her to the grave 
three years ago. They are as follows: 
Mesdames G. W. Stokes, J. B. Gladson, J. 
B. Edwards, J. R. Mills, G. B. Bibb, Mess- 
ers James M., Charles R., Henry B., Wil- 
liam O., and William S. Hardee. 67 grand- 
children, 69 great grandchildren, two sis- 
ters, Mrs. Addie Sermons of Greenville 
and Mrs. Kate Clark of Tarboro, seven 
nieces .ind nephews also survive. 

On the second Saturday in June, 1880, 
srhe, with my dear father, joined the 
church at Red Banks and on the follow- 
ing Sunday was baptised l y Elder Jonn 
A. Williams. Mother lived true to her pro- 
fessions. As long as she lived her talk 
was Jesus and His crucifixion, the way. 
the truth and the life. I believe mother 
was a true Primitive Baptist if there ever 
was one. Her doors were open to the Bap- 
tists. She always filled her seat at church 
■when not providentially hindered. When 
she was taken ill with pneumonia, all 
that the doctor, children and kind friends 
could do could not stay the hand of death. 
Oh, we do miss her so much, but God 
knew best. He works and none can hinder. 
He hinders and none can work. I feel to 
say with Job, the Lord giveth and the 
Lord taketh away, blessed be the name of 
the Lord. 

Dearest mother, thou hast left ns 

And our loss we deeply feel. 
But 'tis God who hath bereft us 

He can all our sorrows heal. 
The golden chain is broken, 

A voice we love is stilled, 
A place is vacant in our home 

Which never can be filled. 
She is gone but not forgotten. 

Never will her memory fade. 
Sweetest thoughts will ever linger 

Around the grave where she is laid. 

She was laid to rest January 2 9, in the 
cemetery at Red Banks, beside our dear 
father. Funeral services were conducted by 
her pastor, brotlier Luther Joyner, whom 
she loved very much. I feel that she is 
sleeping that blessed sleep, from which 
none ever wake to weep— a calm and un- 



disturbed repose, I believe she will hear 
the welcoming voice say, "Come in, ye 
blessed of my Fiither. Inherit the kingdom 
prepared for you from the foundation of 
the world." I believe she has fought a 
pood fight, kept the faith and she will 
wear that crown of righteousness which 
the Lord, our God, hath prepared tor 
those that love and serve him. Oh, thaf^ 
had such a wonderful hope as my dear 
mother had. I feel that this world would 
not be such a world of woe. The things of 
this world had no charm for her. The 
theme of her soul was Jesus Christ and 
how he died to save sinners. 

I pray that the blessed Lord will pre- 
pare us that we may meet our mother and 
father. I believe mother desired to depart 
and be with her blessed Savior in her de- 
clining years. She would often say that 
she desired the end of her journey. Just 
a night or two before she died she tried 
to sing but we couldn't understand what 
it was. l)ut I believe she was singing of 
Jesus and hi« love and of what He had 
done for her. 

I feel that my pen has not done her 
justice. 

In that bright eternal city 

Death can never, never come. 
In His own good time He'll call us, 

From our toil to Home, Sweet home. 

Written by her sad and lonely daugh- 
ter, 

MRS. J. R. MILLS 

Greenville, N. C 



ivnij. BRANCH UNION 

The next session of the Mill Branch 
l^nion is to be held with the church at 
Mvrtle Beach. 

M. MEARS. 



THE EASTERN UNION 

The Eastern Union is to be held at Con- 
cord on Saturday before the 5th Sunday 
in August. 

We invite all who have a mind to come 
that are in gospel order, especially min- 
isters. Thp church is two miles from Cres- 
■well. on highw.ay No. 90. 

A. W. AMBROSE 

Clerk. 



CONTENTNEA UNION. 

The next session Of the Contenfnea 
ITnion will lie held with the church at 
Red Banks. Pitt County, N. C. the fifth 
Saturday and Sunday in August. The 
church is situated about five miles south- 
east of Greenville, X. C. 

Elder Luther Joyner was chosen to 
preach the introductory sermon and Elder 
..\. M. Crisp his alternatp. .\ special invi- 
tation is extended our mi ni^ti^rins br. th- 
len. 

J. E. MEWBORN, Union (Merk. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 

AT ~ 

WILSON. NORTH CAROLINA 
PRIMITIVE OR OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST 



VOL. LXIV. AUGUST 1, 1931 No. 18 



HE DID THAT WHICH WAS RIGHT AND WAS BLESSED. 

"Now it came to pass in the third year of Hoshea, son of Elah king of 
Israel, that Hezekiah, the son of Ahaz, king of Judah began to reign. 

Twenty and five years old was he when he began to reign, and he reign- 
ed twenty and nine years in Jerusalem. His mother's name also was 
Abi, the daughter of Zachariah. 

And he did that which was right in the sight of the Lord, according to 
all that David his father did. 

He removed the high places, and brake the images, and cut down the 
groves, and brake in pieces the brazen serpent that Moses had made: for 
unto those days the children of Israel did burn incense to it: and he call- 
ed it Nehushtan. 

He trusted in the Lord God of Israel; so that after him was none like 
him among al Ithe kings of Judah, nor any that were before him. 

For he clave to the Lord and departed not from following him, but kept 
his commandments, which the Lord commanded Moses. And the Lord 
was with him; and he prospered whithersoever he went forth: and he re- 
belled against the king of Assyria and served him not. 

He smote the Phillistines even unto Gaza and the borders thereof, 
from the tower of the watchman to the fenced city." — 2 Kings 18:1-9. 



ELDER O. J. DENNY, Editor Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

ELDER M. L. GILBERT Dade City, Fla. 

ELDER S. B. DENNY Wilson, N. C. 

ELDER J. T. ROWE Baltimore, Md. 

ELDER JOEL E. MARSHAL Meadows of Dan, Va. 



$2.00 PER YEAR 
TO ELDERS $1.00 PER YEAR 



THE PURPOSE OF ZION'S 
LANDMARK 



"Ask for the old paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the an- 
cient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and strength- 
ened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, and 
regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the Scriptures, and obey Jesus, 
the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping themselves unspot- 
ted from tho world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, the 
Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the blessed 
Comforter. 

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All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel trtuh are invited to write for it — if so 
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trtuh. 

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Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 

P. D. GOLD PUBLISHING CO., 

Wilson, N. C. 



Bcvotc^ to the Cause of S^esus Cbdst 



"WHO MAKETH THEE TO 
DIFFER FROM ANOTHER." 

The felloM'ship of the saints is in 
the truth of the gospel of Christ. In 
this the Holy Ghost has made us to 
differ from the world that lieth in 
wickedness. It is a matter for ador- 
ing gratitude that the Lord has put 
a difference between us and the 
world: This is all of God's grace. 
Well may the Apostle Paul chal- 
lenge the saints to assign any other 
cause than the good pleasure of the 
Lord. "Who maketh thee to differ 
from another,? and what hast thou 
that thou didst not receive? — 1 
Cor. 4-7. We read, "The Lord doth 
put a difference between the Egyp- 
tions and Israel." 

Thus it was in the type, setting 
forth the unsearchable ways of the 
Lord God in His dealings with the 
children of men puts a difference 
between them after the counsel of 
his own will, in which some are de- 
clared to be vessels of mercy, which 
he had afore prepared unto glory, 
and the others vessels of wrath fit- 
ted to destruction. — Rom. 9-22-23. 
0, what a difference! Now this dif- 
ference is not in the earthly crea- 
tion, for the all were created in the 
first man Adam, who was made a 
living soul. Not in their nature, as 
creatures the offspring of Adam; 
for all mankind are alike in their 
nature, and are now enmity against 
God, the children of wrath by na- 
ture. — ^Ephs. 2-3. It is not in their 
national, social or intellectual stand- 
ing that this difference subsists, but 



the difference all flows from the 
purpose and grace of God given us 
in Christ Jesus before the world be- 
gan. 

In this eternal purpose in Christ 
Jesus his people are set forth as his 
chosen and eternally beloved, and 
all the difference between them and 
the rest now in time and through- 
out eternity is embraced in the pur- 
pose of God according to election. 
— Rom. 9-11. Let me repeat a dec- 
larative instance of the difference 
the Lord puts between his people 
and others: "Thus saith the Lord, 
about midnight will I go out into 
the midst of Egypt: and all the first- 
born in the land of Egypt shall die, 
from the firstborn of Pharaoh that 
sitteth upon the throne, even unto 
the firstborn of the maidservant 
that is behind the mill; and all the 
firstborn of beasts. And there shall 
be a great cry throughout all the 
land of Egypt, such as there was 
none like it, nor shall be like it any 
more. But against any of the child- 
ren of Israel shall not a dog move 
his tongue, against man or beast; 
that ye may know how that the 
Lord doth put a difference between 
the Egyptians and Israel." — Exodus 
11-4-7. All the judgments that the 
Lord visited upon Egypt clearly 
marked this difference. One very 
striking difference that the Lord 
put between them was the blood of 
the passover lamb. "The blood shall 
be to you for a token upon the 
houses where ye are, and when I 
see the blood, I will pass over you, 



274 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



and the plague shall not be upon 
you to destroy you, when I smite the 
land of Egypt." "Christ our Pass- 
over is sacrificed for us," — 1 Cor. 
5-7. 

We have redemption through his 
blood, the forgiveness of sins ac- 
cording to the riches of his grace. 
Thus the Lord maketh his chosen 
ones to differ from others. They 
are washed and made white, re- 
conciled and made nigh unto God 
by Jesus precious blood. This, when 
revealed and applied by the Holy 
Spirit, does in truth put a differ- 
ence between them and the rest. 

As believers in Christ Jesus they 
have peace with God, they taste 
the sweets of the forgiveness of their 
sins; they aro cleared from all their 
guilt, justified from all their of- 
fences, and are enabled to rejoice 
that there is no condemnation to 
them which are in Christ Jesus. The 
Lord maketh his own to differ from 
others by the powerful and gracious 
operation of his Spirit. They are 
born again of the Spirit, and made 
partakers of the divine nature. He 
puts his fear in their hearts, writes 
his law in their minds, the love of 
God is shed abroad in their hearts 
by the Holy Spirit and thus they 
worship God in spirit and in truth. 
The fruit of this divine work in them 
is farther manifested in that they 
hunger and thirst after righteous- 
ness, and the beauty of the Lord 
that it may be brought forth in them 
and be upon them. — Matt. 5;6. 
Psalm 90;17. O! to be thus glor- 
iously apparelled! 

Then, beloved brethren, how 
wonderful believers differ frorn un- 
believers, for they are quickened by 
the Lord into eternal life, the rest 
remain dead in trespasses and sins; 
they are illuminated by the light of 



life, the rest are blind, alienated 
from the life of God through the 
ignorance that is in them because 
of the blindness of their heart. "Un- 
to you, saith the Savior, it is given 
to know the mysteries of the king- 
dom of heaven; but to them it is 
not given." It is the unspeakable 
blessedness of God's chosen to have 
as their lot the communion of the 
Holy Ghost.— 2 Cor. 13;14, This is 
the medium of all their spiritual 
comfort and knowledge while pil- 
grims to the better country. He com- 
munes with us concerning eternal 
things, unfolding to us the precious- 
ness of the new covenant; he takes 
of the things of Christ and shews 
them unto us, giving us foretastes of 
heaven, the earnest of our inheri- 
tance until the redemption of the 
purchased possession. 

We are sealed with the holy 
spirit of promise, and under the di- 
vine ministrations of the Spirit we 
are drawn forth in affectionate 
longings to press toward the mark 
for the prize of the high calling of 
God in Christ Jesus, 

God maketh us to differ by the 
sending forth of the Spirit of his 
Son into our hearts, crying, Abba, 
Father. Even now we have fore- 
tastes of the blesedness of adoption 
to which God hath predestinated 
us in Christ Jesus, for we are all the 
children of God by faith in Jesus 
Christ. If indeed God hath thus put 
a difference between us and those 
who know not God, our glorying 
will not be in ourselves, but in the 
Lord who hath so loved and so sig- 
nally favored us. 

Now we are but tasting the 
streams; now we know but in part; 
now we see as through a glass dark- 
ly; now we have only the earnest, 
but the time of our sojourning here 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



275 



will in a little while terminate, and 
the day of our actual eternal per- 
fection draweth nigh, then the eter- 
nal glory to which God hath pre- 
destinated us shall be our actual 
everlasting possession. We shall be 
raised in the ressurrection at the 
last day in the likeness of our dear 
Redeemer. We shall be like him, for 
we shall see him as he is. 

Dear brethren, we have hope to-' 
ward God that there shall be a res- 
urrection of the dead, both of the 
just and unjust. — Acts 24:15. 
"Marvel not at this: for the hour 
is coming, in which all that are in 
the graves shall hear his voice, and 
shall come forth; they that have 
done good, unto the resurrection 
of life: and they that have done 
evil unto the resurrection of dam- 
nation." Thus the Lord shall put an 
eternal difference between the ves- 
sels of mercy, and the vessels of 
wrath. 

"Let me among the saints be found, 
Whene'er the archangel's trump 

shall sound, 
To see thy smiling face: 
Then loudest of the crowd I'll sing, 
While heaven's resounding 

mansions ring 
With shouts of sovereign grace." 

FREDERICK W. KEENE 
Raleigh, N. C. 



WHAT THE DEAR GOOD LORD 
HAS DONE FOR ME. 

When I was just a little child, I 
would have sad feelings about death 
and wonder what would become of 
me after death. I would steal off 
to some lonesome place and try to 
pray and all I could say was, Lord 
have mercy on poor me. I did not 
want any one to know my feelings. 



I would go to preaching, and to 
burials and return home, having the 
same sad feelings again. And oft- 
times crying and begging the good 
Lord to have mercy on me. Oh, 
my aching breast. 

I would think I had T. B. and was 
going to die and oh what would be- 
come of me and would I be cut off 
from good people. Time rolled on 
and in the year 1904, I was married 
and this same feeling would hover 
over and around me. I would find 
myself wondering and begging for 
the dear Lord to have mercy upon 
poor me. I felt too unworthy to 
call on His precious name, and yet 
I could not keep from calling on 
Him for His mercy. 

One night I dreamed there was to 
be a young man buried west of our 
home, and the people began to 
gather in our front yard. And I 
thought there was a great storm 
raging. I thought we all knelt to 
pray. I thought I wanted to die 
by good people and I was standing 
by Hettie Good. We knelt down. 
I looked up. The storm still was 
raging, and I saw five pretty sheep. 
They were caught up off of the 
earth in the storm. I went to John, 
my husband, and said, John, look 
at our baby, she was destroyed in 
the storm. Sand and mud was 
washed up against her. I said, 
John, look at our little baby. He 
was lying too weak to look at her. 
He reached out his hand and said, 
I want to close your eyes in death. 
I went and knelt down and laid my 
head on his breast, just as willing 
to die, and then a light shone 
around us. 

A few months later I had another 
dream. I dreamed there was an 
earthquake. I thought I and my 
second little babe were all that 



276 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



were in the house. I gathered her 
in my arms and rushed out of the 
house, begging the Lord to have 
mercy on me. I started down in 
the meadow where John and two 
or three men were gathered to- 
gether, and before I got to them it 
seemed that I was to be baptized, 
and a crowd had gathered them- 
selves together. So we turned to 
go back up the meadow where I 
was to be baptized. And all of the 
VN-ay I was repeating these words 
over and over in my mind, Lord, if 
ic is right for me to go, make my 
way clear. We crossed the bridge 
and went down on the ground to 
pray. I thought John, my husband 
v/as to be baptized with me. And 
when we knt lt to pray he said there 
was nothing for him to say. I 
thought, well it is not right for me 
to be baptised, if he cannot pray. 
And I was still repeating those 
words over and over in my mind, 
Lord, if it is right for me to go make 
my way clear. He says, now I am 
ready to baptize her. He led me 
in the water. It was clear as crys- 
tal. I thought the water was not 
deep enough. I wanted to go in 
deep water. So he led me up the 
stream where the water came 
around our waists. And he raised 
his hand and said, now I am ready 
to baptize her. And when he raised 
me out of he water, a voice spoke 
and said, they have died. 

I would read the Bible to find 
something to comfort me and read 
these words, "Take my yoke upon 
yt)U, my yoke is easy, the burden is 
light." A few more days passed 
and my husband was reading the 
Bible. I sat down and listened at 
the reading, not wanting him to 
know my feelings, I thought I 
would go to bed and try to beg the 



dear Lord to have mercy on poor 
me. My breast hurt me so. 

I called my husband to my bed 
and asked him to pray for me and 
he laid his head on my breast and 
breathed a prayer to God. 

My breast got easy and I went off 
to sleep with these words on my 
mind, "I am Alpha and Omega, 
the beginning and the end, and un- 
to them that is athirst, I will give of 
the fountain of the water of life 
freely." 

Time passed on until the second 
Sunday in March, 1908. It seemed 
ihe saddest Sui.day eveni-.i.u of my 
life. It seemed I had never seen 
Ihe sun shine so lonely. I stayed 
(>ut of the house, just walking along 
its seemed as I could, without going 
in ?nd telling my little children and 
i;usband farewell, havinv-: iwo chil- 
d 'en one asleep, the other sitting 
alone on the floor. Stooping I kissed 
the little girl asleep farewell, 
picked up the babe and turning to 
my husband as he met me and say- 
ing farewell. It seemed I was sink- 
ing down, and as I thought into 
hell. All in a moment I was raised 
and praising the dear Lord for 
what he had done for me, I said the 
Lord has spoken peace to my poor 
soul. And I just wanted to walk 
and walk, and I said John, let's 
walk, let's walk. We walked out 
in the yard. The moon shone so 
brightly. Oh it just seemed if I 
could die I would be happy. And 
all next day I felt calm and easy. 
And just thought what the dear 
good Lord had done for me if it 
were just engraved in the rocks for 
people to read. 

Again I had another dream. I 
dreamed of traveling a road, just 
myself and second little babe. I 
was walking, carrying the baby 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



277 



and singing this song or humming 
the tune: "In heaven above, where 
all is love, there'll be no more sor- 
row there." I heard music in the 
cloud. All at once my voice was 
changed to that music in the cloud. 
I looked up and saw a large bird 
with outspread wings flying over 
me, and it spoke with a beautiful 
voice and said, "A soul shall enter 
up into heaven joyfully." I awoke 
my husband and asked him was this 
dream to me. He says, yes it's to 
you. 

I had impressions to join the 
church and desired baptism so 
much but felt so unworthy to offer 
myself to such good people. I be- 
came so impressed. It seemed I 
could not live if I didn't join. So I 
went and joined. I feel I did my 
duty. I never have regretted that 
sweet day that I joined and was 
baptized. 

And will say to all that are car- 
rying that burden, go home to your 
friends, and tell what the dear 
good Lord has done for your poor 
soul. 

Sincerely, 

MRS. LUCY GROUSE. 



KINSMEN IN CHRIST 

Dear Readers : 

We may not know one another 
in the flesh yet I trust by the work- 
ings and grace of Almighty God 
that we are kinsmen in Ghrist. It 
has dwelt on my mind for sometime 
to write something for publication, 
yet I hesitate to write when I think 
of so many good writers and their 
soul comforting letters. I feel that 
it is better for me to read than to 
write. I realize that if any good 
cometh from this it must come from 
God, to whom be all the glory and 
honor. Every good and perfect gift 



cometh down from the Father. He 
has all power in heaven and earth 
and He works everything accord- 
ing to His holy and righteous will in 
the army of heaven and among the 
inhabitants of the earth; and none 
can stay His hand or say unto Him, 
What doest Thou? We are made to 
rejoice in this fact for without the 
help of the Lord, man is powerless. 

We hear it preached by some 
that if the person will do so much to 
help them to Christ that God will 
cover the remainder of the way pro- 
vided he (man) will let Him. We 
are taught of God that such a doc- 
trine will not do. Salvation cometh 
through and by the free and unmer- 
ited grace of God. 'Tis religion that 
gets the man and not the man that 
gets the religion. It is not by works 
of righteousness lest any man should 
boast. The creature comes empty 
handed as the poet has said, "Noth- 
ing in my hands I bring, Simply to 
the cross I cling." God's people 
shall be made a willing people in 
the day of His power. They were 
chosen in Christ and their names 
were written in the Lamb's book 
of life and God in His own good 
time and place brings them to a 
knowledge of the truth, and reveals 
in their hearts the light, the hope 
of glory. He places their feet upon 
a rock and puts a new song in their 
mouth. Every one for whom Christ 
died shall inherit eternal life, for 
not one heir of promise shall be 
lost. God is not unjust. His ways are 
passed our understanding. It is not 
for man to know the mind of the 
Lord. Then there is not any place 
left for a religion of chance. 

The world knows not the deal- 
ings of the Lord with His people. 
0, blessed thought. In this world 
the children of God face many trials 



278 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



but in God they find sweet comfort 
and peace. If in this life they are 
encompassed with tribulations and 
find no resting place and comfort 
save in the love of Christ it is a 
surer evidence to them that they 
are born of that upper and better 
kingdom. There are moments some- 
times when they seem to rise to the 
mountain tops and abide in sweet 
fellowship with God, thus it is that 
they are encouraged to press on- 
ward ever trusting in His righteous- 
ness and redeeming love. There are 
times when they are brought to see 
the marvelous workings of God 
manifested in the smallest things of 
nature. The artist cannot paint any- 
thing that will compare with the 
handiwork of God in nature. 

The time is drawing near that I 
must leave off writing, however 
much that can be said the half can 
never be told. These blessed truths 
are too wonderful for me to attain 
unto them, and I hope I love them 
more. I get so low sometimes that 
I question whether I know anything 
concerning God, or that my name 
should be with dear Old Baptists, 
the loveliest band of people on earth 
to me. It is grevious to see confus- 
ion and strife come among them. 
How much better it would be for all 
to live in sweet peace and union. 
When life's journey here is ended 
there is one sweet home over there 
where the redeemed of the Lord 
shall be as one and all will be un- 
ending happiness. 

Remember this little unworthy 
one in your prayers. 

Submitted in love, 

MARY C. HUNDLEY. 

Dry Forks, Virginia. 



EXPERIENCE. 

Elder J. A. Fagg, 
Dear Brother: 

For sometime, I have had a de- 
sire to write my experience, or what 
I feel has been the dealings of the 
Lord with this poor sinner. 

As you have told my feelings 
many times, so much better than 
I could ever express them myself, 
I feel that you are the one I want to 
tell. 

Since hearing the sister relate her 
experience Sunday, which I feel has 
caused me to rejoice, this week, it 
seems that I must write. 

When about six years of age I 
began to think of death, to know 
that sometimes I must die. The 
thought was so terrible that I would 
lay awake at night grieving. Papa 
and Mamma would ask what I was 
crying about; I would tell them 
"nothing" for I did not want them 
to know what was troubling me. 
When but a child I dreamed of be- 
ing in heaven, I thought it was the 
judgment day, and there were 
trains coming from every direction 
bringing people to the judgment, a 
man with a rod in his hand was tel- 
ling every one where they must go. 
He said to one, whom I recognized, 
"you cannot stay here," I thought 
if that one must leave surely I would 
have to go too; but he looked at me 
and said, no you may stay here. 

When I was fifteen, my little sis- 
ter, age nine died. It seemed to me 
that I could never give her up, I felt 
surely she was taken to show me 
how sinful I was. Oh ! the grief that 
was mine, no one can know. I felt 
that I had not treated her as I 
should. This hurt me so I would wet 
my pillows with tears at night, and 
in the daytime at my work I could 
not keep them back. While laying 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



279 



on my bed one night with my eyes 
closed, I do not know whether I was 
asleep or not, it didn't seem that I 
was. She appeared right before me 
clothed in pure white, from head 
to feet. It seemed that I could see 
her as natural as in life. She looked 
at me and smiled, the sweetest smile 
that I have ever seen. This seemed 
so real that I awoke, if asleep, and 
was about to speak to her when 
she vanished. That smile seemed to 
relieve my aching heart. It seemed 
to tell me that all the wrong that I 
had done her was forgiven. 

I did, so much, want to live right; 
but it looked like all my thoughts 
and works were sinful. I felt that I 
must read the Bible and see if I 
could find relief there. I read it all 
from Genesis to Revelation, I would 
not have my people to know I was 
reading it for anything. I would 
wait till they had all gone to bed 
and go off in a room where no one 
could see me, if anyone knew I ever 
read it I had no knowledge of it. 
Although I was no better when I 
got through than when I began, 
yet I felt I had done no harm by 
reading it. 

Sometimes when in the field at 
work, I would feel so wretched, I 
could not hide my tears. My older 
sister and a brother just younger 
than myself could get along faster 
with their work than I could, I did 
not want to keep up with them, for 
I did not want them to know of my 
grief. 

They seemed to enjoy themselves 
and I felt that they did not have 
the trouble that I did. One day when 
I had been sent to the field to gath- 
ed some tender corn for dinner it 
seemed that I must try to pray, I 
got as near the center of the field 
as I could where I thought no one 



would see me. I fell on my face and 
tried to pray; but I do not know 
whether I uttered one word or not 
for I did not know how to pray. 

Finally these troubles left me till 
a few years ago it seemed that they 
were greater than at first, I felt 
that I was not fit to live or to die. 
When walking along the road I 
would look at the little insects craw- 
ling along in the dust and feel like 
they were greater than I. I dreaded 
so much to see a bad looking cloud 
approaching, for I felt surely, I 
would be destroyed. One morning 
in an early spring a black cloud be- 
gan to rise up in the west and thun- 
dering, I said Oh! if I were only 
good enough that I would not fear 
to see a cloud come up. Will said to 
me, the Lord's people are the ones 
that fear him, these words seemed 
to be a great relief to me. 

I have always felt that the Prim- 
itive Baptists were the right people. 
I would go to preaching and they 
all looked so good to me. I felt if 
I could only be one of that number 
my happiness would be complete. 
But felt that pleasure was not for 
me, and could only say "Lord, have 
mercy on me a sinner." This has 
ever been my prayer if indeed I 
have ever prayed. 

I had a" great desire to be bap- 
tized, but felt too unworthy to ask 
a home with so great a people, this 
burdened me so, I said. Oh! Lord 
show me in some way if it is right 
for me to ask a home with them, it 
seemed that something said to me, 
"My grace is sufficient for thee." 
I could then say bless the Lord O my 
soul, I know if I am saved it is by 
thy grace, nothing that I have ever 
done. It was not long until I thought 
perhaps, this was just imagination. 
But finally it seemed that I could 



280 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



not live away from the church any- 
longer, and promised if I should 
live until next meeting day I vi^ould 
go, but when the time drew near, I 
thought surely I could never go. But 
when Elder M. L. Willard got up 
to preach that day and used for his 
text, "Today if ye will hear his voice 
harden not your hearts, as in the 
day of provocation." I felt surely 
that text was to me, and the preach- 
ing seemed to tell me to harden not 
my heart, but fulfill my promise. I 
have often wondered why they took 
me in, and gave me such a sweet 
welcome on what little I said that 
day. They had always looked 
good to me, but I could see an add- 
ed beauty that I had not seen be- 
fore. I cannot express my feelings 
as I came out of the church house 
that evening. The cloud that had 
just passed and was thundering in 
the distance, seemed like the bur- 
den that had left me, and all was 
peace around me. Although, I 
have never felt worthy to be with 
these people, if I can always be at 
their feet, its enough for me. 

The fact that Will was made 
willing to go when I did, and we 
could be baptized at the same time, 
has been much comfort to me. 

The morning that we were bap- 
tized I felt more like I was going to 
a funeral than anything else, but I 
can never forget how pleasant the 
water was, or the peace I enjoyed 
the rest of that day. 

But it could not last long for I 
soon felt I had been deceived, and 
had deceived the church. Most of 
my time I am in the valley. 

Sometimes my "hope" seems to 
be but a mere spark, but when a 
gentle breeze blows and kindles it 
up, for a few moments it seems suf- 
ficient. 



I would like to tell you how much 
I have enjoyed your preaching, yet 
I cannot express in words the com- 
fort that it has given me. 

I must quit here for I fear I have 
already wearied you with so much 
writing, yet the half has not been 
told. I'm sure others could have 
said much more in fewer words. I 
am very imperfect and it is this way 
with all I do. 

If it is not too much to ask, when 
you pray will you pray for me, and 
mine. 

A little unworthy sister, if one at 
all. 

MRS. PEARL ROBERTSON, 
R. 1, Walkerton, N. C. 



EXPERIENCE 

To the dear readers of Zion's 
Landmark: For some time I have 
been moved to write some of my 
experience. I am a poor helpless 
and dependent man upon the Great 
I am. I desire to write about the 
things I have seen with my eyes 
and handled with my hands. 

In the year 1917, I was in the 
World War. Dec. 3, 1917, I was 
carried to a training station at Nor- 
folk, Va., and was carried through 
the process of training for a sea- 
man, to help to transport our dear 
soldiers to France. I was sent to 
the battle ship to be trained as a 
fireman for transport service. Dur- 
ing this time I knew nothing about 
this great God who does all things 
well, and after the council of His 
will. On the night of the fifteenth 
day of January, 1918, I hope the 
Lord showed me what a poor help- 
less sinner I was. I had a dream 
and saw our bear brother Isaac 
Jones as he stood in the pulpit at 
Muddy Creek Church, proclaiming 
that salvation is of the Lord, and 



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281 



I even remember the song he sang 
in opening the meeting. It was 
this, "Salvation, O the Joyful Sound 
it is pleasure to my ears." I knew 
what he preached was the truth, 
and the power of our God. 

I was in this awful condition, 
feeling to know I was condemned in 
His blessed sight. I would try to 
pray, but there was no way for me 
to pray to that One that could for- 
give sins. O, how I did desire the 
mercy of the Lord upon this poor 
worm of the dust. One morning I 
had started to work and I had to 
go through a very dark alley, and 
it seemed as some one had spoken 
to me and said : This is the time and 
place to pray. I fell down on my 
poor bended knees, confessed, "I 
am a poor helpless sinner in the 
world and if I am saved it is 
through the sufferings of thy dear 
son, and O Lord, forgive me of my 
sins, if it can be Thy holy will;" 
and there I was made to rejoice, I 
hope in Christ Jesus, the Lord, hav- 
ing no confidence in the flesh. I 
began begging the good Lord to de- 
liver me back home, if it could be 
His will. And for some reason in 
about 5 days from this time, I was 
sent to the hospital from the ship 
and before I left the ship they 
placed a tag on my breast and 
wrote these words on it D. L A. G. 
And I wanted to know just what 
these words meant, and as soon as 
I I reached the hospital I asked the 
doctor just what these letters 
1 meant. He looked at them and said 
I your case is undecided. I felt at 
this time surely the Lord was in the 
' place, though I knew it not. I was 
! still begging the Lord if it could be 
His will to deliver me back home 
to my dear father and mother. I 
I wanted to tell them what a Saviour 



I had found, and confess my faults 
to them and tell them what a bad 
sinner I had become to be. I went 
to see the preacher. I told them I 
desired to be obedient as far as I 
could be, and it was not but just a 
few moments before up came the 
priest and began talking to this poor 
worm of the dust, I was wonder- 
ing what should I say to this man, 
but I tried to ask the Lord to loose 
this poor stammering tongue of 
mine and give me just what to say. 
He asked me didn't I want to be 
saved. O yes, I said, the worst all 
things I ever thought of. He said, 
well I am glad I came for I am in- 
terested in such people as that. 
Then, he wanted me to bow down 
to him and give my sins to him. (O, 
my dear readers, what a place I was 
in) but I said, I bow down to no 
man, priest, pope nor king. I only 
bow to that One I hope died for my 
poor soul and redeemed me from 
Hell. Yes, but he says, I forgive you 
and take your sins unto the Father 
on high. I told him there was but 
one advocate between God and 
man and that is Christ the Lord. If 
the Lord ever loosed this poor ton- 
gue of mine, for a few minutes he 
loosed it there, and after I hushed he 
told me if I went to Hell he could 
not help it. I told him that Salva- 
tion is of the Lord. And he went 
away from me, and in four days 
from that time I was at home. 

Praise the Lord for the great 
things I hope he has done for me. I 
would praise His holy name. 

I wanted a home with God's hum- 
ble poor people, but I wondered 
though if they would let me be with 
them. I did not know whether 
they would receive me or not, but I 
fixed time and again to offer my 
poor self to them; but I could not 



282 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



get it fixed, but on the second Sun- 
day in September, 1925, our dear 
brother Bragg preached at the 
church of Sand Hill and it seemed 
like the Lord fixed the way for me. 
Everything was moved out of the 
way that time, and they did receive 
me and I was baptized on Monday 
morning after I joined Sunday, by 
brother L. E. Bryan. 

Now, my dear readers, these are 
some of my feelings and some of the 
things I have seen with my eyes, 
and handled with my hands. Give 
all the praise unto the Lord for He 
is the giver of all good and perfect 
things for it is in Him that we live 
move and have our being. 

I hope you all can have a mind 
to pray for poor me and mine. 

In love and sweet fellowship with 
God. 

P. H. EDWARDS, 
Beulahville, N. C. 



A GOOD LETTER 

Mr. J. D. Gold, 

Here is a letter I received yester- 
day. If it is not asking too much of 
you I would like for you to publish 
it in the dear old Landmark. I have 
her permission. I have never met 
this dear sister, but her letters to 
poor unworthy me are wonderful. 
I feel that we are taught of that 
great blessed Jesus, alike. I would 
be glad if you would publish the 
letter, if not please return it to me. 
I don't want one copy of her pre- 
cious letters destroyed. I take them 
with me and read for my people, 
the old Baptists. Remember me in 
your prayers. I love you for dear 
old brother Gold's sake. 

I hope I am a little sister. 

SUSAN HIGGINS. 
Greenville, N. C. 



The Letter 

Woolwine, Va. 

Precious mother in Israel. Doubt- 
less you think I am rather careless 
in not answering your dear letter 
before now; here I am offering an 
apology. You wrote so nice about 
your church and good times I could 
be with you in imagination and hear 
all that good preaching. 

I am truly glad you were so bless- 
ed to be among your beloved family 
and enjoy the sweet gospel of love 
and peace. 

Were we together I would try to 
tell you about a dear heavenly feast 
I had (if not a poor deceived mor- 
tal.) The third Sunday in October 
1930 it was my privilege to hear 
the brother D. V. Spangler that 
wrote an article in November 15th 
copy of Landmark preach such a 
dear good sermon. 

Brother Spangler is one of the 
humblest and most gifted elders I 
ever heard preach. He preached the 
beloved gospel in its purity and gave 
God all honor, all praise and glory 
and such preaching edifies and 
builds up our weary hearts. When 
this young elder arose to take his 
place at the book board his song 
was — 

"Father I stretch my hands to thee, 
No other help I know. 
If thou withdraw thy self from me 
Ah, whither shall I go. 

Brother Spangler then dropped 
the singing and the church sang 
the balance of this precious hymn. 
Oh ! mother in Isreal my very being 
seemed absorbed in a petition to our 
heavenly Father to be with this dear 
elder on this occasion and my heart 
melted within me and my tears 
not only flowed, but streamed 



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283 



down my cheeks, and every word 
this dear elder spoke was fitting 
and to the praise of Jesus, blessed 
Jesus the Saviour of men, leaving 
puny men out entirely, just where 
man belongs. 

We know there dwells no good 
thing in our earthly tabernacle, and 
how sick it makes me to hear any 
of our faith and order declare any 
merit on man's part. We know how 
helpless and depraved we were in 
our convictions, yes how awfully 
helpless we are now and will con- 
tinue helpless sinners and unless 
our preachers preach Jesus and Him 
crucified I had (for my part) rather 
they (preachers) kept their seats. 

The old year with its many trials 
and sorrows has passed, but I can 
look back on 1930 as being a great 
year to me, even though there has 
been so much said about the drou- 
ght, crime and lawlessness. 

One of my many blessings is I 
have met you dear one through the 
columns of the dear